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15 ft long outside air kit??? - new question - can I go up???

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by jwscarab, Nov 14, 2008.

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  1. jwscarab

    jwscarab New Member

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    I am usually of the oppinion to do it right!!! If it costs a little more and is a little more work, but makes the install correct - do it!!!

    That being said - I am considering if I should install an outside air kit for my T6.

    The stove will be in a lower level that is above grade on 2 sides. The stove is against a wall that is backfilled with dirt outside. So I would need to drop out the bottom of the stove and run 15 feet horizontal across the floor - then drill out thru the concrete wall to open air.

    Will the length of pipe restrict the air flow and defeat the purpose?

    That being said - anybody that wants to throw out an oppinion - I am all ears.

    Thanks in advance!!!

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  2. snowtime

    snowtime Minister of Fire

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    I do not think the length of the oak will hurt anything in fact it could heat the air up a bit and help combustion. The thought I have is it is going to be a bit of a job so I would run the T6 without the oak first, if it runs good then you will not have to do the extra work. I do not have an oak but I can see if you have a very tight home that it could be a benefit.
  3. thechimneysweep

    thechimneysweep Minister of Fire

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    JW, Howard "Sweet Child" Lopeman, our install foreman, says he has run OA feeds over 20 feet with no problems.
  4. jwscarab

    jwscarab New Member

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    OK, that is solved!! Thanks all !!!

    So now my question is - do I need it?????

    Let me say even if my stove burns great w/o it, but I will benefit from more effieciency with it.......I would rather install it.

    I am all up for the correct thing to do, but I dont want a total waste of time/effort.

    Does anybody have a reason I should not do this?

    I guess this question has already been answered in other posts - I will search......lol.
  5. staplebox

    staplebox Member

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    I've got about 15 ft of OAK and it works fine. The air still stays pretty cold, at least the pipe stays cold right up to the back of the stove.
    I also have a basement install but also an external chimney. I needed the OAK to get a good draft. If I didn't need it I wouldn't have put it in.
  6. jwscarab

    jwscarab New Member

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    Can I run it vertical and cut out above the concrete wall?? The exhaust flu is 32ft tall. The OAK would be 10 ft tall.
  7. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    I'd be trying to get out above the sill plate on top of the concrete foundation wall. It would put me out above the ground which should also be above any snow accumulation that might block it.



    Edit: don't forget a critter guard. (unless you happen to like baked mouse and snake.)
  8. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    Ditto, I have the same. I ran mine about 6' horizontal, then the rest up and out the sill plate. With that vertical run the cold air really likes to dump down and push towards the stove. I put a "U" in my vertical run to help slow her down some.
  9. jwscarab

    jwscarab New Member

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    Awesome! This helps my decision - I always thought it was a huge no to go up. This makes my job a whole lot easier - and no drilling thru concrete!! I also dont need a boxed in pipe along my family room floor now. I'm doing it! Thanks all !!!! I think I may put in a butterfly valve to shut er off when not in use!
  10. Ithaca

    Ithaca New Member

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    Good luck. I run about 12 ft. of OAK and have had no problems. I'm sure you will be pleased.
  11. North of 60

    North of 60 Minister of Fire

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    Snowtime there is just more factors than a tight house. A leaky house also would justify an OAK due to all the unwanted drafts you cannot control that may be in your house. Low humidity would also be a key issue living in the north as we do. ;-)
  12. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Outside air is also a safeguard against backdraft pumping smoke into the house. My former home had more than a 15 foot run and was not a problem. Insulate it well so you don't get frost and condensation. Also, watch your clearances in case it backdrafts and gets a little warm. You also need to be careful about elevating the intake as that could induce backdraft.
  13. jwscarab

    jwscarab New Member

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    I know I am beating a dead horse, and I am sorry. I have searched and searched - even on hearth. All info I see on oaks show it going down thru the floor - but I dont see anything telling me NOT to go up.

    Does anybody see any reason I cant go out bottom of stove, - then run horizontal sitting on basement floor 1ft or so to the concrete wall driectly behind stove, then run up the wall straight up 10ft and out the band board?? Sounds like a couple have done it, but is it OK that way??

    Thanks very much!!!
  14. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    It should be fine. The only reason most people don't do it that way is they prefer to keep the intake pipe hidden.
  15. jwscarab

    jwscarab New Member

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    Thanks so much!! And if I were to bury this pipe in my vertical wall in the future - centered directly between my future 2x4's 16" on center - sandwiched between the concrete and the drywall - I am against clearance codes???

    I see a lot of info on people debating to oak or not to oak. I have decided to oak.

    But I dont find a lot of detailed installation info or requirements. Maybe there arent any because it is a cold air intake???

    Thanks very much again!!! I hope I am not asking too much!
  16. staplebox

    staplebox Member

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    Mine is about 15ft and about 6ft of that goes up. I go out the back of the stove a foot or 2 to the corner then up through the drop ceiling and across to a hole that was already cut above the sill. It works just fine, no frost or back draft. It fixed my draft problem.

    It does look ugly as hell hanging down behind the stove. I planned to box it in or otherwise hide it but not many people see it in the basement and I have better things to do. Maybe a project this winter.
  17. jwscarab

    jwscarab New Member

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    Yes, I agree to keep it looking as nice as possible!! I am thinking about running it inside the wall once I finish the wall behind the stove - but it was mentioned to watch clearances in case of the pipe getting hot if it backdrafts. Not sure if an oak would backdraft if it were running up.... Not sure where to find clearance requirements for an oak. I usually catch on quick - but not with this subject.....lol.
  18. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    By elevating the intake, you run a risk of the vent reversing and turning into a hot chimney! You need to go down and horizontal for a distance and insulate it well, maintaining some clearance in case it reverses and passes hot gasses. You might consider a backflow preventer to be safe.
  19. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    My OAK intake is located 7' above the stove and there is no way that thing is turning into a chimney. Cold air is denser than warm air and it dumps right down to the stove. I don't see any possible way it could reverse unless my chimney was plugged.
  20. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    I'm not saying it will, I'm saying there is a minute possibility it might. With the right (wrong) wind, the OAK intake could be in a low pressure cavity relative to the chimney. Furnaces have pressure differential sensors between their intake and exhaust and strict rules on their placement.

    If you go down and horizontal for a distance before going up, chances are it will be safe.
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