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$1850 for oil fired boiler flue liner?

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by slate, Apr 19, 2013.

  1. slate

    slate New Member

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    Just had chimney cleaned. Tech cleaned Jotul insert and its liner. He also inspected the oil fired boiler flue. He said the tiles are in really rough shape (cracks, disintegrating) and strongly recommends a liner in the next year - tops. He showed me the tiles but I have no frame of reference to know what they should look like.

    Quoted us $1850 for a 6" stainless shell liner, T, and top plate.

    We heated house almost exclusively with wood this winter, and plan to do the same next. We do burn a little oil to heat the upstairs at night. Tough to heat house all night given location of stove. Also, we have oil fired DHW burner and tank. So, we do use that flue all year.

    Thoughts on that price? Thoughts on options?

    Thanks

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  2. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    I hate to say it, but it doesn't sound totally out of line. How tall is the flue.
  3. slate

    slate New Member

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    Flue runs from basement up two floors of house, attic is only crawlspace, then a few feet above the roof. 30 feet maybe?
  4. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Sounds about right. You might find someone a few hundred less, but without seeing it myself, $1800 is not out of the ball park. If you trust this guy's work, I'd go with it. I can show you examples of work done by "the guy who was a few hundred cheaper."
  5. slate

    slate New Member

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    Thanks for the advice Joful. I trust them. Neighbors who burn a LOT of wood recommended them. Used them twice and they are very professional.

    uggg . . . first year burning wood 24/7. It was a lot of work, but I was so excited about the money we saved. Was hoping to put the savings toward something fun . . . not a flue liner.
  6. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Well, bottom line is you saved. Imagine if you'd spent money to heat with oil all year, and still had to do the flue liner! Next year will be better.
    Jags and pen like this.
  7. slate

    slate New Member

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    Agreed. Thanks for advice.
  8. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    How much oil do you burn in a year?

    If you could replace it with something else (e.g. some baseboard electric heaters, a mini-split heat pump, etc.), and do away with all the oil related stuff, you might see some serious savings - especially factoring in replacing your oil DHW heater with something electric. Or, if you replaced the oil boiler with an electric one, replace the oil DHW with an electric one, forgot about the chimney, and yank out the oil tank all together - you might be way ahead of the game. Unless, that is, you still rely heavily on the oil boiler for heat during heating season.

    I'd seriously investigate all the options in getting rid of the oil - chimney problems & potential oil tank liabilities will disappear.
  9. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    Venting out a side wall is not an option ?
  10. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Oil boilers normally require chimneys.
  11. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    DSC_3440.jpg All the new houses here have powervents - no roof penetrations except for DWV
    I have a non-power vent ( the fan is built into the burner ) -double wall flex exhausts out, pipe brings in fresh air from outside.
  12. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    I think side venting depends on the type of boiler?
  13. slate

    slate New Member

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    Side venting not an option given furnace location.

    Is there a reason to install a liner if tiles in chimney are giving out? What's the danger? Never heard of a chimney fire from oil burner.
  14. slate

    slate New Member

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    Maple1 - great ideas! Will likely convert DHW to electric sometime. We have baseboard hot water radiators throughout house so no room to add baseboard electric. Plus would be nervous to convert solely to electric for resale value of house. Might be fine for people planning on wood for main source of heat but most people round here do not burn. And houses around here with electric heat only are avoided by buyers I think

    Heat pump, maybe. But New England in Jan/Feb? Could it possibly be effective?
  15. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    I changed my direct vent from a wall to a roof exhaust.

    It exhausted on the back wall of the garage at about face level on the patio and about 4ft from my bedroom window. Between getting exhausted in my face while BBQing, hearing it run while trying to sleep and also the wind blowing the fumes into the attic it was a bad deal!


  16. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames Feeling the Heat

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    Why not install the chimney liner yourself and spend about 1/4 of the price? It is very easy.
  17. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    That's the first thing I don't like about the power vents on all the new houses in the projects next door - they are rather loud

    Mine is silent - but putting it on the unused side of the house where I wanted it was unjustifiably expensive.
    Soon as my roof is fixed and the solar panels are up my furnace won't be running in the summer for heating water.
  18. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    http://www.chimneylinerdepot.com/store/chimneylinerkit.php#

    They have liners suitable for oil. They offer a 30 foot liner for $460. Their super duper Flex King Pro is $590.

    If you don't feel comfortable on a ladder or up on the roof you can rent a bucket from Home Depot that will lift the weight of the liner and you for $200. I can tell you a 30 ft liner with insulation is not light. I don't know that you would need insulation for an oil furnace though. Your masonry chimney certainly isn't insulated.

    Matt
  19. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Not mine. Side vent . . .
  20. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames Feeling the Heat

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    Oil furnaces are not required to have insulation, even though it always help improves draft. But if you do not have any issues right now with draft it will be fine with the standard liner with out insulation.
  21. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Hey... you learn things here! I've lived in a lot of houses with oil furnaces and boilers, and all had the same setup... masonry chimney. Don't think I'd want a side vent, putting out oil exhaust fumes close to ground level, but I guess it's being done. Heck... the oil boiler chimney on my house is at least 40 feet above my back yard, and I can still smell when it's running, depending on wind direction. I can't imagine that exhausting along the side of my house, where it can be drawn back in thru leaky windows.
  22. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Non issue in my case . . . no windows nearby . . . and honestly . . . it doesn't run that often except once in a while in the winter in the early mornings on those very cold days . . . it's about head high and sticks out enough so it doesn't soot up anything. Like another member, it's not a power vent, but vented at the boiler.

    And yeah . . . I still learn things here as well . . . and not just woodstove related stuff. Hearth.com really is a great site.
  23. slate

    slate New Member

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    I never really considered doing this myself. I have a feeling my wife will veto this. But what's involved?

    My chimney is very easy to access. Climb up one story to the roof of garage. Walk across garage. Up 3 feet to the roof of the house. Chimney is accessible right there. Gambrel colonial to pitch of roof on top is very very comfortable. Top of chimney is easy to access.

    I doubt I need insulated. Most of the chimney is inside the house. Only the top 3 ft stick out. And quote from chimney company didn't mention it. But maybe I should splurge?

    Is it As simple As lower it down the chimney and connect it up? Do u need to test that connections are airtight or anything?

    Boy hearth.com is the best!
  24. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    The video is an insulated liner, but you will get the idea. I did it slightly different in that I could not install the T at the bottom of the run since it would be inside the chimney where there wouldn't be room to work. I attached the vertical part of the T before it went down the chimney and installed the perpendicular part at the bottom. It's only held on by a strap or hose clamp. The liner should be a much lighter and easier install when there isn't insulation or netting on it.

    Matt
  25. slate

    slate New Member

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    Pics of roof/chimney

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1366714222.705175.jpg ImageUploadedByTapatalk1366714232.254562.jpg

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