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1983 Energy Harvester stove specs

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Ratman, Aug 20, 2009.

  1. ephriam

    ephriam New Member

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    Thanks a lot. I checked out his post on Craigslist and its the identical stove; only wished mine looked like that. I'm going to email him. Thanks again. Will keep in touch.

    Fred

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  2. Ratman

    Ratman Feeling the Heat

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    Fred,

    Did you ever use a flue pipe damper with that stove?
    Here's a reference to an ongoing thread pertaining to this:

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewreply/449312/

    Thanks,
    Dave
  3. ephriam

    ephriam New Member

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    Dave,
    Yes I did early on and removed it after creosote leaked from the flue pipe. At the time I was a newby and didn't know what I was doing. Probably still don't. I have a triple wall stainless chimney running from a basement window on up. After hearing one chimney fire I decided to burn the stove hot enough to avoid that in future and that's what I've done for years now. When I go up on the roof in the Fall to shake out accumulated buildup there is very little, maybe a pint. I know that burning hot all the time is not economical but I use 1-2 cords at most per winter and the convenience and peace of mind are worth it. I've heard some interesting new stuff on "Hearth" lately, like there is a creosote trap that lets you burn it off and something about an aftermarket catalytic converter. I'm not going to pursue it but they might be worth a look of you use the stove a lot more than I do.

    Fred
  4. Ben321

    Ben321 New Member

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    Hi Everybody. I'm new here and just want to introduce myself. Thats a nice little stove you got there. I'm a fan of the old style potbelly and box style stoves myself. Not too big and u can cook on some of them. Last year I picked up a new heat reclaimer cuz the last one sorta fell apart over the last few years. I really wasnt expecting to get something that actually performs as advertised but i've been pleasantly surprised. Only used half my stack last year! No bull.... i bought it from Flue-master.com
    You wont believe how much heat it puts out.
  5. myke232

    myke232 New Member

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    Oct 13, 2009
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    Central MA
    Hello,

    I just stumbled across this post/site after searching for info about my woodstove. I just bought a house over the summer that has this exact wood stove. Unfortunately, I don't know anything about it or wood stoves in general, but enjoyed learning what I could from this thread.

    Any advice for a first time user? I have attached a couple of pics. Mine doesn't have the screen inside the door like the OP.

    Attached Files:

  6. Ratman

    Ratman Feeling the Heat

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    Hi myke,

    Welcome aboard.
    This link has just about all the info I have.
    One thing I would recommend is the screen.
    You would have to contact the gentleman I referenced in this thread who lives out by you to get one. If so it is well worth it. If that fails then consider making a very sturdy replicate.
    It really helps. I love the stove.
    I think your damper is suppose to be a few inches from the stove instead of that far up the pipe.
    I have not decided on one yet.

    I welcome any info from you also and thanks for posting.
  7. myke232

    myke232 New Member

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    Cool, thanks a lot for your help.

    I'm curious as to what the benefits of the screen are. Does it project more heat? Does it burn better/hotter? Also, doesn't more smoke escape through it?

    I haven't had any wood to try it out proper yet, but I need to get it going soon with how cold it's been lately.

    Wow, looks like this is a fast-moving forum.
  8. Ratman

    Ratman Feeling the Heat

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    Nice...

    Screen is great at start-up allowing maximum air in, and also to assist when things aren't burning quite right; and obviously to see the fire.
    Smoke doesn't leak out.
  9. ephriam

    ephriam New Member

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    Hi Myke,

    That stove looks as though it's never been burned! If that's the case layer the bottom with sand and start off burning a few light fires. If the room is as small as it looks, the stove will drive you right out of it. I've burned that identical stove for 25 years and am still happy with it but if I had to use it for the primary heat source in the house I would get a modern more efficient one. Setting the air intakes on it is individual because it depends on the draft and how hot you want to burn. Typically the lower air intake is more open than the upper (which is said to burn any combustibles that get past the lower box). I burn mine hot ever since I had creosote drip down the pipe. Good luck and let us know how you make out.

    Fred
  10. myke232

    myke232 New Member

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    Hi Fred,

    Thanks a lot for the info.

    I tried it out yesterday for the first time. It was just ok. I didn't put any sand down (hadn't read your post yet). I know the wood I have isn't great, I think it was just some old maple logs I had on the property already.

    For the air intakes, I am completely ignorant about them. Should I have the bottom one open and the top one shut? I know they are all different but I need a starting point. Would does opening/closing actually do? I mean I can gather that open allows more oxygen so it burns more?

    Also, I had some some trouble with smoke escaping at times when opening the door; any tricks on that?

    Lastly, no this is not my primary heat source, but I'd like to use it to supplement a bit. Also, next try I will have to get some better wood.

    Thanks!
  11. ephriam

    ephriam New Member

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    Myke,

    The bottom air intake is for the main burn. The top one is a kind of afterburner that provides oxygen to burn uncombusted gasses. My guess is that it only works when the stove is burned hot. I keep the bottom vent open three quarters of the way, the top only a quarter. I hardly ever change them. As for smoke, if some comes out when you open the door you don't have enough draft. If your pipe is going into a large chimney space or if it's too long or has too many right angles or the geometry of the roof is causing wind to blow down or . . . .!!! Too many Ifs. Burning the stove hot may solve the problem but your best bet is to get someone knowledgeable about stoves to look at your setup. Smoking up the house is no fun: I've done it. Good luck.

    Fred
  12. Ratman

    Ratman Feeling the Heat

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    Myke,

    Here's some links for you:

    http://home.comcast.net/~ratline/Firewood/Woodstove_Energy_Harvesters.pdf

    http://home.comcast.net/~ratline/Firewood/Energy_Harvester_patent_description.txt

    http://home.comcast.net/~ratline/Firewood/Energy_Harvester_Patent_US4407265.pdf


    Also just as Fred pointed out, the bottom one is the primary air regulator and the top is the secondary.
    I recommend using dry wood only.
    Try getting a screen or get one prefabbed. It really helps for start-up.
    If you can't get a screen then both regulators need to be wide open for start-up.
    You can gradually close them down using your pipe and stove thermometer as a guide at a rate of 2:1 top:bottom.

    Here's a link to a thread with a pic I took tonight.
  13. Ratman

    Ratman Feeling the Heat

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    .
  14. myke232

    myke232 New Member

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    Thanks a lot for all of your help guys! I Tried again today with more success, but still need to get better wood. But yeah, thanks again for all your help explaining the air regulators; great info for me...
  15. Ratman

    Ratman Feeling the Heat

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  16. myke232

    myke232 New Member

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    ^^^Sweet!
  17. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

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  18. Ratman

    Ratman Feeling the Heat

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    thanks....ya this Delaware guy even has the original front screen. For some reason I haven't seen another removable slate piece in the front like mine. Mine is black and carries the picture (bushes & rocks) around to the other side. I think my uncle knew the owner well.
  19. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    The upside is even if it's a lousy stove it sure is nice looking.. I love the art work they cast into the stove.. So much detail in the casting it's amazing! The casting must be high quality to get such detail.. How does it burn? To me good looks and performance are important as it is the 1st thing you see when you walk into the front door..

    Ray
  20. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Your stove and install look great and I love the woodwork in that room.. Have you been running the stove and how well does it heat?

    Ray
  21. JayDogg

    JayDogg Member

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    Raybonz,

    I noticed the picture of your wood shed. Thats pretty nice and functional looking, you got any other pics you could send me? Im thinking of building one for next season.
  22. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Hi Jay,
    Yes I have a few pics and they are posted here somewhere but I can send them if you provide an email addy (you can PM the email addy if you want).. Jay you wouldn't happen to work in S. Boston would you? There is someone at my job that uses your alias...

    Ray
  23. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Found the link Jay: http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/25866/ ... There are other sheds here that are better than mine but so far so good...

    Ray
  24. JayDogg

    JayDogg Member

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    No I dont work in South Boston. Im from South Worcester County. My email is jdub862001@yahoo.com if you wanted to email me those shed pics.
    Thanks
  25. ephriam

    ephriam New Member

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    Thanks Mellow,
    That's my stove but after 25 years it doesn't look like that one!
    Fred

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