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310 Stihl bar/chain oiler

Post in 'The Gear' started by burr, Nov 29, 2012.

  1. burr

    burr Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2008
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    80
    Loc:
    down the road
    Ive gotta 310 (stihl) about 10 yo with light use til I got my stove 3 or 4 seasons ago. Its still 'light' used compared to most of you all, about two cords a year from tree to stack.

    Chain/bar oiler is not functioning and I wonder if anybody has anything on this. I ran a torch tip cleaner up in all the holes I could find and blew it all out, just from the removed bar area. But I think maybe I need to go farther in. Any ideas before I have to hire it out ?

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  2. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Run the saw with the clutch cover off and no bar/chain. If you don't get oil coming from the oiler port then you prolly are gonna hire that one out by the sounds of it. On the off chance that you do get oil, take some compressed air to that bar and blow down the groove and through each oil port.

    Sometimes the pickup in the tank gets clogged with sawdust. I'd set the oiler for maximum flow (it's adjustable on the 310) and try flushing the tank out with kerosene. Run the saw with a bit of kero in it to see if it flushes out the oil lines and pump as well.

    If you're ok with removing the sprocket/clutch drum, check to make sure the wire arm of the oil pump drive gear is engaged in the slot on the edge of the clutch drum.
  3. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Anderson, Indiana
    I let the kerosen soak over night then run it through. If you dont see anything by then its the pump.
  4. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    Every time I have the chain off I take a small piece of wire (10/12 gauge copper...or in my case concrete tie wire) that has been flattened out (couple taps with a hammer)and scrape out the bar groove and oiler holes real good. There's an amazing amount of stuff that builds up in there...that *might* be all or part of your issue.
  5. burr

    burr Member

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    down the road
    OK, Im taking notes, thanks fellas.

    I thought I had it cleared at first as I had a little moisture on the chain area after cleaning but it stopped (me thinks). Ima gonna clean again including the bar slot and see. I didnt know about the bar slot.

    Maybe run the kero thru it if needed further.
    smokinj likes this.
  6. burr

    burr Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2008
    Messages:
    80
    Loc:
    down the road
    I pretty much just let the big dawg eat this past weekend. After cleaning up the bar areas and the bar groove, I could see oil was pumping proper. It just wasn't getting to the chain. Also, my chain had gotten to the age that the wear was uneven tooth to tooth. And that affected the saw performance greatly. I put on a new chain after cleaning the wood chips away and after trading around some different chains, finally got it right. I believe the chain wear had some sort of effect on the wood flour getting in the chain groove.

    Man, I forgot how productive this saw can be. Think I'll get another new chain and let go of the old wore out ones I've been fightin.

    Thanks for the solutions and ideas on my bar / chain oiler problem.

    Meanwhile, it's still 70 around here and coming offa very mild winter last year, my pile is getting way big and that 2 and 3 year old barn kept dryness.
  7. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Take the old ones to a pro with a grinder. He should be able to even them out and get 'em back to cutting for much less than new chain.

    Sharp chains make chips. If you're getting flour, the time to stop and re-sharpen has long past.
    smokinj likes this.
  8. burr

    burr Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2008
    Messages:
    80
    Loc:
    down the road
    yes, MasterMech, I took my older chains to have them dressed out after handfiling for a season or two (just so they could be straightened out) but they came back from the shop in no better shape. I will get my chains done 'professionally' then just touch them up lightly between jobs and they seem to work out nicely like that but I was to the point of losin' em.

    Dont worry, Im not trashin 'em, just hangin 'em on the wall.

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