1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

7-Ton Electric Log Splitter (Sold under the names WoodEze, Pow 'R' kraft, and Ryobi)

Post in 'The Gear' started by DanCorcoran, May 12, 2011.

  1. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2,043
    Loc:
    Richmond, VA
    The last mention of this splitter that I can find using the "search" function on this forum was about 6 months ago by folks who had recently purchased them. Can anyone provide me with an update of their experience with this? Has the unit held up and performed as you'd like? Have you had any experiences with the company that provides warranty coverage, parts, etc.?

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2,043
    Loc:
    Richmond, VA
    Bumpity bump bump...
  3. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Dan, maybe they are all still out there splitting their wood because they are a bit slower. :)
  4. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2,043
    Loc:
    Richmond, VA
    About 100 views of this thread so far, with no owners responding . My guess is that folks who are serious about wood cutting, splitting, and burning have heavy-duty splitters and enjoy Hearth.com all year 'round. Those with small electrics are probably not spending time in the off season looking at Hearth.com.

    I realize these small splitters are not heavy duty, but neither are my needs. I'd just like something reasonably reliable that has spare parts available. I also don't want another gasoline engine to maintain and feed, hence electric.
  5. Kenster

    Kenster Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    Messages:
    1,579
    Loc:
    Texas- West of Houston
    Dan, you can't shame the members here into post a product review. With 100 hits, surely someone would have replied if they had any information for you.
  6. fatwoodfirestarters

    fatwoodfirestarters New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2011
    Messages:
    46
    Loc:
    West Virginia
    We sell electric splitters but not the small 7tons because so many people end up not liking the small ones. Our smallest electric is 16tons and sells for just under $1100.
  7. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2,043
    Loc:
    Richmond, VA
    That wasn't meant to shame anyone. I was just trying to explain why there'd be 100 views and no responses. An additional reason would be that there are a lot fewer of the small electrics in use by hearth.com readers than other types.
  8. tfdchief

    tfdchief Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    3,331
    Loc:
    Tuscola, IL
    Dan,
    I had a DR 6 ton electric splitter for a while. I split with a maul most of my life. As I got older and it started to hurt, I went looking for a little help. I thought I just need something to split most of it and I could still split the rest by hand. It split most stuff but it really made me unhappy when it wouldn't split one and I had to throw it off to the side and use the monster maul. I am a wood scrounger and have to take what I can get and a lot of it is knotty, gnarly stuff that doesn't split easily. If you are only splitting straight grained 12 in and smaller stuff (from nice straight trees, no limbs, grown in the woods) the electrics work just fine. As BS said, they are a little slow. I ended up trading mine in where I bought it and got the one in my signature. Love it, nothing stops it. ;-P
  9. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    6,941
    Loc:
    N.E. Penna
    Since you want opinions I'll give mine based on experience w/ cutting wood in general. Otherwise, best I can give you is the reviews off of amazon, which I assume you have seen:

    http://www.amazon.com/Pow-Kraft-655...2?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1305596299&sr=1-2

    The folks who ranked it w/ a 2 or less complained it wouldn't work on more than 10 in diameter wood. I suppose you have to take it for what it's worth w/out knowing the folks. After reading the reviews, the low end ones seem more honest to me. The high end ones seem like people trying to justify their expenditure.

    If it were me, I wouldn't spend that kind of money on it. For not so much more you'll have a unit that will last 20+ years and do anything you want.

    But again, that's just me. I grew up using a log splitter that my grandfather built which had a 2 cylinder Wisconsin engine which was hand crank (no pull cord)

    I now split everything by hand. I could still borrow that splitter if I wanted, but that's just my bias so that you know since I haven't used an electric.

    If you buy one of these be sure to review it. Pics too! But, my 2 cents is that I hope you don't. If people are having trouble with this on any variety wood in 10 in diameter I have serious concerns.

    pen
  10. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2,043
    Loc:
    Richmond, VA
  11. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    6,287
    Loc:
    Sand Lake, NY
    I've split several cords, I would say, with my little Harbor Freight electric splitter.
    You have to fiddle around with wood positioning (a fair percentage) when it doesn't split, and it does indeed choke on a fair number.
    It doesn't say "7 ton", but I'd take those claims with a grain of salt. Mine has a "2 HP" motor.
    It's held up well. I found my old "just bought it" thread - wow does it look nice and shiny.
    Any it was only $240 bucks!
    I can't believe it's been 5 years.
    I'm planning on trying it out on some of the rounds after I start cutting up the log pile-not totally for laughs (I have a gas splitter now too).
    It's super convenient to move and does well on a pretty long extension cord.
    PS: I wouldn't use a kill-a-watt meter for measuring peak draw; I have a multimeter that does this now.
  12. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2,043
    Loc:
    Richmond, VA
    Thanks, Velvetfoot. What I like about the Pow'r'Kraft is the two-stage pump, but it's good to know that the Harbor Freight splitter has worked for you.

    My woodstove is at my cabin, so I am seldom there and thus use very little wood. It makes no sense for me to buy a more expensive (larger) splitter, since I'd have nowhere to store it. It'd be sitting out year 'round and would probably disappear, since the cabin is unguarded when I'm not there. An electric one I could store in the small shed.
  13. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    6,287
    Loc:
    Sand Lake, NY
    If you unscrew the little handle, mine can even be stored vertically.
    They seem to be getting a little bigger, lately, as well as more costly.

    Two-stage sounds good though. You have to make sure it'll run on your outlet too, as in, maybe the inrush current would trip a 15 amp breaker and not a 20 amp breaker.

    I sit on a pail with a pad on it and have a few pieces nearby that I can pick up and put on the splitter. I also use a square piece of wood as a spacer to help the cycle time.
  14. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    6,287
    Loc:
    Sand Lake, NY
  15. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2,043
    Loc:
    Richmond, VA
    Thanks for the info. Yours looks to be more solidly constructed than the current Harbor Freight model.

    I realize that the Pow'r'Kraft doesn't say it's a two-stage pump, it says it's a two-speed motor. Not sure what the difference is, or if it matters, as long as there's 7 tons at the higher setting. That video shows some impressive splitting (starting about 7 minutes into the video). I expect I'll use mine with no more than a 25-foot long, 10-gauge cord on a 20-amp circuit.
  16. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    6,287
    Loc:
    Sand Lake, NY
    Actually, it looks identical, except the new one has pneumatic tires. When I need to, I put mine on a dolly.
    4 bills is too much.

    For me, this year, it'll be easy to get this right to where the wood will be stacked vs the gas splitter. Leave it there, bring it back, no problem. If I can find an easy way (ie, the lawn mower-pulled trailer vs wheelbarrow) to get the rounds there, I'll be golden. I wonder if HF would give me a prize if I did the entire grapple load with this splitter and a backup maul (and wedges)? Just kidding.

    Edit: I was just reading the reviews on HF, and several said they used the 20% coupon, but I swear that I've read it isn't good for splitter.
  17. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    Messages:
    3,732
    Loc:
    Just Outside the Blue Line
    I suspect on many of the negative reviews that folks don't know what end of the log goes at what end. Just like with a gas splitter, it pays to align the round in the easiest splitting orientation.

    My $300 unit does the job fine or me. I've split some pretty big rounds (up to 16" across) of cherry, black birch and even shagbark hickory with mine. So far, I'm pretty impressed. Funny, the guy I bought the black birch from was whining about his gas splitter having problems with it, so I told him to keep it coming in big pieces and I'd re-split whatever wouldn't fit in the stove. He laughed and said, "That little thing will blow up first log you try it on", but it went right through the stringiest rounds. I keep it sharp, so it cuts through most of the strings.

    On oak, maple, cherry and ash, it just pops them apart... convincingly. I've caught more than a few on the back of my forearm, and glad I was that I leave it there as a guard because they might have bounced off my noggin' if I didn't. Cycling time is just OK, but I'm not trying to make a living splitting the stuff.

    I have to take down a big elm that died last year. I'm curious to see if this unit has the snot to do any of it. That will be the true test. Now, if it will only hold up for five years, I'll be tickled pink. I had no expectations of this thing lasting 20 years when I bought it, but 5 years at $60/yr would be way easier and cheaper than renting a gas splitter a few times a year.
  18. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    6,287
    Loc:
    Sand Lake, NY
  19. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2,043
    Loc:
    Richmond, VA
    Battenkiller,
    Which splitter do you have?

    Velvetfoot,
    The HF 7 ton that I'm looking at online appears to be different from yours (the block in front that is pushed by the piston/cylinder, for example).
  20. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    6,287
    Loc:
    Sand Lake, NY
    Looks pretty much the same to me.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  21. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    Messages:
    3,732
    Loc:
    Just Outside the Blue Line
    Dan, I have the one from Lowes, but I think they are all basically the same. The differences are very subtle at any rate. Mine is called "Task Force" by Lowes.

    Here's a YouTube video of it:

    [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LzZCxVT9Y84&NR=1[/youtube]

    Notice how it just plows right on through that funky piece at the end of the clip, slicing through the wood fibers as it goes. Mine's only been stopped once, and that was a ridiculously gnarly butt section of box elder, huge one at that. I flipped it over and knocked off the edges until I got it to a more manageable piece and got 'er split fine. Like I said, I believe keeping the edge razor sharp helps with a small power splitter like this one. Also, always remember to keep that valve open in use. Failing to do that may break it and void the terms of your warranty. I got the extended Lowe's warranty, and I plan on raising a pretty big stink if it fails and they try to get out of fixing it.

    Heh, heh.... yeah, me against Lowe's, that oughta go smoothly. Like David vs. Goliath on crack prolly. :roll:
  22. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2,043
    Loc:
    Richmond, VA
    Velvetfoot, you're right. I was misinterpreting the hauling handle, which they apparently moved from the end of the cylinder to the support frame. Also looks like they beefed up the wheels a bit, but a solid frame in any event.

    Battenkiller, I think I'm convinced that an electric will be all I need.

    Thanks, folks.
  23. Singed Eyebrows

    Singed Eyebrows New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2009
    Messages:
    1,420
    Loc:
    Midwest
    I have the Ryobi 4 ton & it splits 90 percent of everything as it is. What it won't split, I cut a saw notch the depth of the bar in the end & there isn't anything that wont split this way, Randy
  24. Kenster

    Kenster Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    Messages:
    1,579
    Loc:
    Texas- West of Houston
    How do your knees hold up, squatting on the ground all day? I think I'm going to settle for an electric splitter. Maybe the seven ton one at Harbor freight.
    Since you roll up upright on that built in dolly, can you operate it in Vertical position?

    Any problem with running this at the end of about 100 feet or extension cord?

    Someone mentioned changing out the power switch to a toggle switch so you don't have to run it with two hands. Would that work? Bad idea?
  25. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2,043
    Loc:
    Richmond, VA
    I think the instructions state the maximum length and minimum gauge extension cord required. Ten gauge or twelve gauge and 50-feet is what I remember, but could be wrong.

Share This Page