1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

'83 Country Flame insert vs. Lopi freedom/freedom bay

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by TKeller, Jun 4, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. TKeller

    TKeller New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Messages:
    62
    Loc:
    western ky. (owensboro)
    I am not totally satisfied with my old insert. I want longer burn times(3 hours max.now), less creosote, less wood consumption and less heat going up the flue. It just pours out the flue in the cold weather. A chimney specialist said he would put a 8" insulated liner connected to the stove with top plate and that would help especially the creosote issues. In fact no more creosote. Probably for around $1700.

    The only new modern stoves available are 30 miles away and are lopi at a patio and spa location. I think reputable with stoves and been in business a long time but high, high, high!!! Their deal is 6" uninsulated liner, top plate, lopi freedom bay with blower, trim panel, black door for $4200. It would take 3 years of burning for payback as propane is not real high here. $1500 next year(2.49/gal.) Last year $1000. at 1.79/gal.

    My chimney is interior river rock with 12x12 clay flue and excellent draw. Would the insulated 8"liner in old stove help put more heat into room (less draw) and less creosote above roofline. Or would the new stove in fact put out more heat, less creosote, and less wood were it would be worth the 3 year payback. Other facts. No one does block off plates. As far as issues with the creosote it is the hard glaze above the roofline. I clean it myself every year and can get it clean except for the hard glaze. As far as insulating the new liner chimney specialist says it would help safety by helping insulate hot flue liner from creosote on tile. New stove dealer says on interior chimney do not need insulation and of course would be more than $4200. Oh and also the chimney specialist can get napoleon or drolet but I have ruled that out as my wood is cut too long and big so I want close to a 3.00cu ft. firebox. My country flame insert is 4.3cu.ft. double glass door, baffled air flow out sides and top. Throws out alot of heat but you have to FEED it to keep this heat going.

    I'm concerned with the new stove that I won't be pleased with it in different ways that I wished I kept the old one. I have asked the modern stove store to give me a couple customers names who bought new stoves to replace old stoves to ask them if it was worth it but they haven't got back with me on that in 6 weeks. I could be happy i guess and keep what I got and be okay and spend no money. Afterall, the whole idea for me is to save money. Please help with ideas and recommendations if you can. Thanks Tony

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. TKeller

    TKeller New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Messages:
    62
    Loc:
    western ky. (owensboro)
    Well I will try to simplify the above post and then go away. I know most people already use newer inserts and want to forget about the past. In reality most people in my area still have old stoves sitting in fireplaces (some using them/most not). Our one stove shop in this town of 60,000 went out of business several years ago. So it's a struggle. Anyway.

    Anyone with experiences on adding a liner to an old insert and how it affected performance? (Already have a great draft).

    Should I request that the liner for a new insert be insulated because of the glazed creosote on the chimney flue for safety reasons?

    Those that have used old stove inserts vs new what are differences in operation? In other words what will I probably have to do differently to operate the new insert (lopi) effectively?

    Appreciate this site and all the great information. Tony
  3. burntime

    burntime New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    2,395
    Loc:
    C'mon hunting season!
    I went from a 1980 cemi insert with about a 3.5cu ft box to a hampton insert 2.5 ish. I used to burn Dec, Jan and Feb only...6 cords. Now I burn a little from October thru April. The house is warmer, the insert keeps it warm all night, and I still burn 4-6 cords and I think that the storage where I kept the wood kept it a little damp. With fuel prices (all fuels) I think a 2 year payback is probably a realistic goal. If wood is free then start saving...if you pay for wood you will cut consumption in half...calculate that in too!!! Good luck.
  4. burntime

    burntime New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    2,395
    Loc:
    C'mon hunting season!
    BTW, your climate in KY is much more tame than Wisconsin. I would bet you could get by on half of what I use if you compare apples for apples.
  5. TKeller

    TKeller New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Messages:
    62
    Loc:
    western ky. (owensboro)
    Thanks burntime. I am almost embarrassed to say this. Even with our halfway moderate climate in Kentucky I burn at least 6 cords(locust, hedge included) and if it gets colder than 20F. especially with wind the insert can't keep up. That is one motivation for looking for improvements in my setup. I just don't want to throw good money to bad if just putting a new liner in an old stove isn't going to help. Like I hinted in my last post there aren't too many experts in this area.

    One question you may can help me on. Was your new stove more finicky to operate. In other words I don't want to have to baby it to keep the stove hot enought to burn off the smoke.etc. Also, I have heard some complaints that with new lopi's their burn times weren' t that really long either. Guess I could get back to the dealer who up to this point was kinda squirrelly with his answers. Thanks again.
  6. burntime

    burntime New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    2,395
    Loc:
    C'mon hunting season!
    The liner will INCREASE the draft. New stove can be started much easier and not suck all the heat out of the house while trying to start it. I live in WI and deer hunt in Bath Co, KY. You may be better off adding insulation at this point to conserve the heat you have. If you want to do it cheap check out lowes or Home depot stoves...I am not a big fan but for the money it is a big improvement over the older stoves.
  7. TKeller

    TKeller New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Messages:
    62
    Loc:
    western ky. (owensboro)
    Thanks again burntime. Part of my problem is I have the classic vaulted ceiling 1 1/2 story house with alot of glass and some patio doors leading out to decks. I cannot bring that heat back down. At least 15 to 20 degrees dif. Anyway does sound like a new stove will help and just need to cut loose some money and enjoy life.

    I kinda thought the liner would increase draft and suck even more heat out. But it would be nice not to have to pull the old insert out when I clean it. Yes the hunting is good. I was mostly rabbit hunter with beagles for 20 years. Fond memories.
  8. burntime

    burntime New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    2,395
    Loc:
    C'mon hunting season!
    One last thing, that osange orange I think it is called or the honey locust (if you can get by the thorns) burns really long. That stuff is the equivilent to midwest oak, maybe even better!!!
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page