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A couple things I learned this year

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by wg_bent, Mar 21, 2006.

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  1. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    1. If you don't split apple, a 1.5 years is still not enough to season it, even if it's a stick an inch around

    2. Green Pine is quite hard to split.

    3. The little white worms inside the bark of a dead tree are termites.

    As I think of others...will add.

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  2. babalu87

    babalu87 New Member

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    I agree on the Pine

    Things I learned

    1: A 30" + diameter Oak tree is OLD, real old (over 100 years old, sot of made me a little sad to cut it down) and even if it looks to be in bad shape it can be healthy

    2: Said Oak tree CAN BE split with an 8lb maul and enough attitude (each round is over a days worth of wood too)

    3: Ants smell faintly of pepper when crushed inside wet Red Oak

    4: My house having all those windows on the South side will save me about a cord of wood per heating season

    5: 66 degrees feels cold ;)
  3. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Elm is damn hard to split
    woodman and math is a one way street
    frozen wood splits easier
    Drying requires eliminating ground contact and exposure to wind and sun
    one can never get enough wood for free
  4. DavidV

    DavidV New Member

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    Let me add a few

    Even when the price of NG and heating oil double, lots of people still look at you like you're a primitave for heating with wood.

    Children don't care how much money you save by heating with wood. They still hate work.

    Every little bit of insulating you do with your house adds up.

    When you've "paid for it in advance" by splitting/stacking the wood, you don't mind if somebody "turns up the heat".
  5. Mike Wilson

    Mike Wilson New Member

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    I don't think they are termites. They're larvae of something, beetles I think. Termites live in the ground, and only venture up into the wood to get food. They don't live or grow in the wood itself.

    -- Mike
  6. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    ... that i didnt know as much as i thought i did when i discovered hearth.com. I learn new things here everyday.
    -Ryan
  7. MarkM

    MarkM New Member

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    You're right, those most likely aren't termites. Termite workers are only about a 1/8" long. Most people think they're much bigger than that. I believe what he's seeing is the larvae of some type of wood borer.

    By the way, the biggest thing I learned this year was to go REAL easy on the starting fluid when starting a diesel tractor in sub-zero temperature. If I'm lucky, it's only a head gasket. Unlucky, cracked head, or worse.
  8. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I learned that there are two air-holes in a baffle housing covering the blower on my boiler. I also learned that if you allow them to become clogged, all the air is channeled through the grates, resulting in burned out grates. I learned that I need a new set of new grates.

    Live, burn and learn.

    My favorite firewood bugs are the big grub worms that you'll find in the decayed centers of some trees. They're big, juicy and they don't last long if there are birds around, so you gotta eat 'em when you see 'em.
  9. MarkM

    MarkM New Member

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    True, he didn't mention the size. However, he did mention that they were inside the bark of a dead tree. This led me to believe that they weren't termites. Also, true powderpost beetle larvae are only a 1/4" long.
  10. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    The stains on the Soapstone are proof.

    But, as I recently discovered, all comes clean with a bit of sandpaper and steel wool.
  11. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    After clearing my lot this past spring, and bucking all of the pines, I stacked it in rows all around the property.

    By August, the sound of those little white worms chomping away in the early morning silence was nearly deafening. Stereo times 10.

    By fall, when I split all the pine, those little guys managed to eat away at that layer between the bark and wood. The bark just fell off, and little white worms everywhere!

    They pop rather nice from intense heat.
  12. got wood?

    got wood? New Member

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    * never stack wood up high between trees...strong wind storms will make you curse like a sailor when trees sway and let the wood slide...then the domino effect takes out 2 other perfectly fine racks (grrumble mubmle mumble grrrrrumble)
    * talk to tree cutters for free (or cheap) wood
    * splitting wood is good cheap anger management
    * unseasoned red oak STINKS...I smell it over my burning stove!
    * thanks to hearth.com I realize how little I know about wood heat! ;-)
  13. babalu87

    babalu87 New Member

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    Piss Oak as my dad always said

    I love my Piss Oak ;)
  14. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Hmm, It does sound like Powder post beatles now. The worms are about 1/2 inch long, maybe slightly less. I find them in Oak and Apple so far. The Pine has lots of Black ants. The worms leave trails under the bark and small indents and lots of dust under the bark. The worms are white.
  15. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Another thing I learned...

    I split my wood too much the past year. Bigger logs burn longer, and it's less splitting/stacking work.

    I'd like to see a picture of someone's wood pile with a 6 or 8 lb maul as a reference. Someone who's been splitting wood for a lot of years. It's a balance between drying time and work to split. I got hold of some HUGE apple this weekend, and that is tough to split. Not Elm tough, but these rounds are 18-19 inchs tall and 20" across. HItting them with my 6 lb maul is almost comical. But enough working around the outside and they go eventually. I'd guess these rounds weigh around 120lbs a peice. I can fit only 1 in a wheel barrow. As a comparison, to elm, similar sized rounds of completely dry elm I have to cut into 8" tall rounds. Between wet Apple, Elm, and wet Pine, This has been one hell of a work out this past week or so. I need some nice Maple or Ash for a break.
  16. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

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    536
    Loc:
    Rome, NY, USA
    Things I learned this year.

    1) A non-cat stove works completely different than a cat stove.
    2) a bigger stove does not necessarily give off more heat.
    3) don't buy a used stove on impulse, check if it fits in your install first.
    4) the little white worms also live in cherry wood.
    5) 12" unsplit cherry logs are not dry, even after 1.5 years and even when they are cracked at the end. Next time, split and remove bark.
    7) Wood heat creates a lot of dust and small pieces of wood all over the carpet, that 10 month olds love to eat.
    8) Take advantage of any warm days you have.
    9) Plan ahead, always have way more wood laying around than you think you could possibly need.
    10) Wood heat is a learning curve, not a place you just get to and stop.

    Carpniels
  17. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I'm a firm believer in Carpneils' #s 9 and 10.
  18. Mo Heat

    Mo Heat Mod Emeritus

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    Loc:
    St. Louis, Missouri
    Things I learned this year...

    I still know of no one that cuts and burns more wood than Eric Johnson.
    Elkimmeg probably gives away nearly as much wood as he burns.
    Those frightening looking bugs with huge pincher heads under the bark are probably not termites like I feared.
    Some people actually cut firewood (Elm) to 8" lengths (sorry Warren :).
    Dylan has the capacity to be nice when he really tries. :)
    It's quicker, easier, and more effective to split big rounds directly on the ground than to heft them onto my chopping block.
    I enjoy burning fake logs (100% wood type), even though I can't find them in my area.
    Wood burning attracts some of the smartest and nicest people I've never met.
    No one believes Aquafuel or Magnegas is the Perfect Fuel. :)
    Electricity in Missouri is relatively cheap.
    I can turn down the NG furnace and save money using electric space heaters and no one even whines about being cold.
    Craig has one of the coolest web sites I've ever found.
    Red Oak is also called Piss Oak, and it smells good to me when it's wet. (sorry GotWood and Babalu :).
    Compact Flourescent bulbs are better than they used to be and save a lot of electricity.
    My two carbon monoxide detectors peak readings are still zero.
    It stays much warmer in my finished basement if I keep the two doors closed to the unfinished basement.
    Cedar has less BTU's than I thought. Dogwood and Pine have more BTU's than I thought.
    You need more than 1/3 acre to supply 3 cords of wood per year, sustainably.
    Nobody agrees on the best way to dry wood the fastest. Contradictions abound.
    Everyone agrees that a holz hausen is a cool looking wood pile.
    People are more rude when talking about politics than when talking about wood burning.
    The Hickory trees in my yard are Mockernut (thanks Dylan).
    After Craig's story of his CB gathering, I should probably avoid any potential hearthnet gatherings. :)
    Soapstone stoves may be the coolest of all stoves.
    It seems like there are more people with cat stoves this year than last. Maybe the stigma against cats is dying or the novelty of the newer non-cat secondary combustors is wearing off. Mo's motto: If it's not a cat, it's a dog. :)
    The new forum software has more bugs than the old forum software, but users like it better.
    Jonas was likely swallowed by a whale with a belly full of pellets.
    Robert C. may never report back regarding his compressed log experience.
    Mo believes Mike Wilson may have even more experience weaving baskets than Mo does.
    Shock treatments seem to improve Mo's writing skills.
    Mo is not the only suburban stealth wood burner.
    A pickup truck or trailer will likely be required before Mo can tell the WoodMan to take a hike.
    Marty still has the coolest (warmest) stove on hearthnet (masonry heater).
    Marty's grandma has the coolest sayings.
    Burning coal may be possible in Missouri, but it will likley be Bituminous coal.
    We're running out of oil faster than Mo originally thought.
    No one is more rude, informed, or outspoken than Frank. :)
    Alternative energy is only going to get more popular and more important.
    Construction on Mo's bunker is behind schedule.
    Solar energy is still economically unfeasible in Missouri.
    America effectively has no solution for what is likely a coming energy crisis.
    Chicken Little may have been correct.
    Burning lesser BTU wood like Elm, Ash, Cherry, Pine, and Sycamore is cool on warm days.
    There aren't enough pellets to go around. This could also make compressed logs more expensive and less available.
    ACE hardware says they sell compressed logs, but after four months of promises, I learned otherwise.
    My $80 green metal Chinese garden cart sucks.
    Mo's posts are longer than anyone else's.
  19. pinetop

    pinetop New Member

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    the top down method of fire starting works great with dry wood. (2) heating with wood gives you a sense of independence even if you buy it. (3) the steady heat of wood is far superior to forced air . (4) watching an active fire is far superior to an episode of desperate housewives. (5) trying to heat the house up enough to get the wife to shuck some clothes usually puts me to sleep first.(6) men are way more impressed by flames than women. (7)this site has a lot of good info from the members
  20. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    1) Modern stoves are very finely tuned instruments
    2) Act early for the best deal. If everybody else is thinking about it, you're too late.
    3) Be persistent. Expect the best from that Jotul (or Harman coal burner)
    4) This great forum is a nice place to hang out (but a major time sink)
    5) How to split wood and cut up a tree correctly and cool ways to stack it.
    6) I'm not the only one that thinks it's past time that we all started conserving energy
    7) I really don't want to own an outdoor wood furnace (or want one near me)
    8) spell checkers can be your friend
    oh, and
    9) smoke curls counterclockwise up the chimney or clockwise for the aussies. :)
  21. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Only one casting foundry left in USA Vermost Castings In Bethel VT

    I never knew anyone who got hit with one of the thousand points of light Till Mo heat bought a VC LWW

    I always thought 4X4X8= 128 one cord

    Never heard cords or wood described in pieces

    The penguin award went to Hot Flame's dealer for stringing him the longest whiule keeping the stove for his floor model

    Thanks to Hot Flame's Math the surface temp produces 100% more heat starting at 450 elevating to 600

    First time I ever got banned something to do about corrolis effect and Dylan

    I thought Old yeller was a dog but it turns out to be brother barts chainsaw which still maybe a dog

    Karen Duke Sean Kennedy where are you?

    Harman had more issues than Englanders

    Lime 4x4 did my draft meter ever show up

    Most hits for a post The get together plans

    Biggest bummer Vineteri going to the Colts

    One thing constant yankees suck
  22. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    1. I'm not the only one that's obsessed and a nut case about wood heat.

    2. Cat stoves aren't so intimidating. I should of bought one years ago.

    3. A Holz Haufen is a pretty cool way to stack your wood and we'll see how effective it is.

    4. If you look hard enough you can find good deals on firewood.

    5. Mo Heat does have the longest threads, but their so entertaining and hilarious.
  23. adrpga498

    adrpga498 Minister of Fire

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    1. No substitiute for a sharp chain, safer too.
    2. Hols Hausen stacking has sceptics , but I will save linnier space in my yard by building mine this week.
  24. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    1. Dylan turned over a new leaf and is not a prick after all.

    2. Dogwood remains the hottest burning wood I have ever burnt.

    3. After going to a cat stove, I will never, ever, go back.

    4. Freshly split oak in the fall simply smells fantastic.

    5. Women that feed the stove in the middle of the night, without complaining, are maybe worth keeping.

    6. I'm not sure I'm glad, or not glad, that Elk is my local inspector. But, good information is priceless.

    7. Craig is the most left wing liberal I have listened to in my life. He happens to be correct alot.

    8. Eric Johnson has alot of experience that is worth listening to. Keep him away from the rain forest in Brazil.

    9. Peak Oil is on our doorstep. Thank Frank for piqueing my interest.

    10. The little white worms are powder post beatles.

    11. This forum is an invaluable source of information. Membership will double (or triple) by the end of this year.
  25. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    O.k. I just learned that Pinetop has been married wayyyy too long. #5....Most guys wake right up if their wife starts to shuck some clothes in front of the fire. ;-P
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