A scrounge in a old grove...help me with an id please?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by schlot, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. schlot

    schlot
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    Helping out a relative by cleaning some downed trees in his grove. Not the most productive day of scrounging, but getting out in the woods on a cold day is always fun!

    Is this Mulberry?

    wood20.jpg wood21.jpg
     
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  2. Wood Duck

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    I can narrow it down to Mulberry or Black Locust, and I am leaning toward mulberry. It looks too yellow for Black Locust and not dark orange enough for osage orange.
     
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  3. schlot

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    Thanks, in person it does look more yellow than orange.
     
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  4. Ralphie Boy

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    My first thought is black locust. I've never cut any mulberry so I can't say for sure. I can say for certain that is snow on the end of that round and snow does not burn well.:p
     
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  5. raybonz

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    Looks like locust to me but I don't know what Mulberry looks like..
     
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  6. schlot

    schlot
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    LOL. So I guess the ice logs I made are a bad idea?
     
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  7. osagebow

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    If it stays yellow, locust ( my guess). if It turns a reddish brown , mulberry. Any thorns on it?
     
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  8. The Beagler

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    Burning Hunk

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    It's mulberry. Great burning wood!
     
  9. Ralphie Boy

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    Hey Beagler! I've not seen you around in a while. How's the winter treating you? I've got a Beagle story for you, give me a call or stop in sometime!
     
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  10. ohlongarm

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    Black locust 100%not mulberry nice find.
     
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  11. Ralphie Boy

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    Well... them ice logs are hard to start and tough to keep burning and don't even think about trying to split 'em! On the up side, once you get them burning good, you can capture their steam and heat your whole house. To do that, of course, you'll need to get yourself a tight mesh steam net, about a number 4 should do it. Number 4's are the green ones.;)
     
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  12. Thistle

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    Mulberry.Great stuff.
     

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  13. midwestcoast

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    That's a tough call, but I'd say Locust based on bark. The wood looks more like Mulberry, but for a Mulberry to have bark that thick & furrowed I would expect it to be a real big old trunk.
    Black Locust.
    Either way it's great stuff!
     
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  14. schlot

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    I looked up the BTUs for both...like you said, either way it's a nice little score. Just wish the tree was bigger.
     
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  15. weatherguy

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    Mulberry 100%, not locust, great find :p

    Joking aside, it doesnt look like locust to me but does look like mulberry.
     
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  16. chvymn99

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    ok, im going to go against the grain here. But im not 100% sold on either. Im thinking Osange Orange. The bark, color of the wood, and the dark center of the wood around the fold in.

    [​IMG]

    But any which way you slice the pie, any of those three will be a good heat supply.
     
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  17. Ralphie Boy

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    Ha! And you thought there was an easy answer!;lol
     
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  18. schlot

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    Not impossible, but I think southern Iowa has some but up in the NW corner I'm not sure we do. But then again....
     
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  19. Thistle

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    Lots of it in southern & southwest IA,NW Missouri,scattered small amount within 25-30 miles west of me in Dallas/Guthrie counties,some south in Madison,Warren counties.None immediately near where I cut in Guthrie however.
     
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  20. blwncrewchief

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    Wow, that's a tough one. I do agree I think it is an old mulberry. It is in the 50-60+ year old range and that is making a bit tough. Bark looks a bit rough for what I'm used to for mulberry and leans toward BL. I also could not rule out OO as the growth rings look more like OO than either mulberry or BL to me. As stated above, the keys for me would be thorns = BL or OO, no thorns = mulberry. Split a piece and take it inside for a few days, turns reddish brown = mulberry. If thorns, OO look more like a cone shaped spike and BL looks more like a rose bush thorn. Any leaves would make it real easy as none of the three are close to the same.
     
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  21. ScotO

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    I'm leaning towards mulberry as well, but I've been wrong before...:p

    The sapwood being really white has me leaning that way. Of course, I've also seen fresh cut locust that has a band like that too....
    The best way to tell if it's locust that I've found is to give it the sniff test......smell a fresh cut or split of it. If it has an "olive" smell to it, then you've got locust. Locust, when cut green, has the smell of pimentoed olives....

    That will seal the deal.
     
  22. schlot

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    Oh great, my wife already thinks I'm off the deep end will all the talk of "wood this" and "wood that". Now you want me to smell my wood??? I see her buying me a new jacket....one with very long arms! LOL
     
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  23. schlot

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    Sorry, it had been dead for a while for a while so no leaves. There weren't any thorns on the bark either.
     
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  24. osagebow

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    Thorns on the branches?
     
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  25. schlot

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    None there either, it was a mess to get to the trunk will all the branches down, so I'm sure I wouldn't have painfully noticed.
     
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