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A solid method of shoulder burning

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by mywaynow, Jan 11, 2013.

  1. mywaynow

    mywaynow Minister of Fire

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    My wood has to be trimmed down from 25 inches or so, to about 18 for the new stove. The ends are anywhere from 1-6 inches when cut away. I would have guessed that a full stove of ends would be a risky load likely to cause a runaway burn. This is not the case at all. A full load with primary air wide open burns very slowly. I am guessing that is due to the lack of continuous air paths for the fire to spread through. I had to add a couple splits onto this mornings load to get the stove up to a temperature that would offset the 35 degree overnight effects. These loads of ends burn consistenly, just slowly. A nice ability to have. We are supposed to see upper 50s this weekend, so there will be lots of chunks loaded for the next few days.

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  2. rugerman1

    rugerman1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2010
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    5
    Loc:
    Western Pa
    I get a lot of oak 4x4's from a friend's worksite.They are usually bent/cracked/busted to various lengths.I cut my firewood to 20" lengths for the wood stove(s).The leftovers become fodder for the punks&chunks firewood box for shoulder season burning.The short 4x4's plus crooked/gnarly/unstackable firewood, sure do save a bunch of prime firewood.
  3. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    I was in the same situation, and still find plenty of long ones. I'll still get 24 hours out of a load of chunks, 10-12 if the weather is cold.

    I think your on the right track with the irregular shapes and the way the air moves through them. It takes a while to get rockin', especially if they're packed in there good.
  4. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    I threw in a bunch of "shorties" as I call them, freakin' stove ran away fast....900* in a short period.....my bad for walking away from the stove to early....lesson learned:(
  5. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    in the highlander its box is shallow and mostly allows e/w burning but if you cut the wood in like 8" lengths I can load N/S. I have used end cuts to load the stove before and I can really pack it tight this way vs e/w. When I cut this winter I will but some specifically for loading like this in this stove, next time at the farm.
  6. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    It certainly will depend upon what type of wood it is and how dry that wood is. When we burn cut-offs, it is usually done during the daytime and also we tend to burn those in spring or fall and not a full load.
  7. raprude

    raprude New Member

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    Dec 21, 2012
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    Loc:
    Ann Arbor, MI
    "cookies" are a pain to stack and carry. I've taken to burning them in "campfires' near my splitting area when working the pile in the winter.
  8. mywaynow

    mywaynow Minister of Fire

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    I have nightmares about fires near my stacks.
    clemsonfor and Thistle like this.
  9. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Michigan
    Something I've never worried about.

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