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Advice on a used Wood burning stove - Vermont Casting Dutchwest

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by _stephan, Apr 13, 2010.

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  1. _stephan

    _stephan New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
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    Loc:
    NJ
    Hello,

    I found a used Vermont Casting Dutchwest Seneca model 2170 which I am looking to purchase for $500 (asking price). From the reading I have done, this appears to be catalytic stove, the stove appears to be in good condition and is rated as such by the seller.

    My intent is not heat the whole house, but to set up the stove in a ground floor room which is very cold in the winter hoping to cut down on my oil bill. I am able to get seasoned wood for free so not a problem there.

    I was wondering if anyone could give me some feedback on this particular model and if the asking price is reasonable?

    Any input welcome!

    Thank you.

    Stephan

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  2. REF1

    REF1 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    265
    Loc:
    South West, VA
    Hey Stephen,

    Other people will chime in with actual experience, but over the years I have read alot of things about Consolidated Dutchwest stoves and changes the company has gone through. There have been issues with their cast iron, so you want to really inspect the stove for any kinds of defects like cracks or open seams, etc.
  3. _stephan

    _stephan New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    NJ
    Thank you for the advice, I will definitely take a close look. It appears the most expensive part it the catalytic element and I am not sure how I would inspect that?

    Is $500 a reasonable price should the stove be in good condition? I am just getting my feet wet when it comes to wood burning stove and hope that finding a good used stove is wise VS buying new.

    - Stephan
  4. REF1

    REF1 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2009
    Messages:
    265
    Loc:
    South West, VA
    The way I would find out if the price was fair would be to get a date when the stove came off the assembly line, and then see what the model sells for new today. You could also do some searches for the same model on craigslist to get an idea what others might be selling it for.

    Buying a used stove is fine, people do it all the time. With the advent of stove paints you can make an exterior look like a new stove, even in various colors. But the firebox is the main thing. Look for things like whitening of the metal both outside and inside which can be a sign of over-firing. The combustor age is generally 5 years, so find out the date of the stove and if that combustor is the original or changed at some point and how old it is. You'll know in general what kind of life it has left to it. It should come out of its housing and when inspected should show no signs of crumbling or cracks. You can't know if the coating is still good, as far as I am aware. But if the combustor is all clogged with ash, figure the owner didn't take care of it very well. They can lose life if they are not cleaned out periodically.
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