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advice on which insert purchase. drolet 1800i?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by carter, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. carter

    carter New Member

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    i am wanting to purchase an insert and i dont know what to get. i have a 2000 sq ft house.

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  2. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Going to need more information than that to give you some good suggestions.

    What kind of house is it? 2 story? Ranch? Open layout?

    How big is the room the insert is going in?

    Is the insert going on the mainfloor or the basement?

    How well insulated is your home?

    Are you looking for supplemental heat? Or plan to heat 100% with wood?

    What is the size of your fireplace opening?

    What is the diameter of the chimney flue you have?

    What kind of fireplace do you have now? (traditional or pre-fab)

    Do you plan on burning hardwoods or softwoods?

    These are just a few of the questions that would help you get the best answer.

    Welcome to the site.

    pen
  3. carter

    carter New Member

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    its a single story. the living room is ab 600sqft and that is where the insert will be going. house is insulated very good. i have a heat pump but am wanting an insert to just help out sometimes and for emergencies too. 42 1/2 height x 29 tall x 26 depth. the flue is 6in x 32in. i dont know about traditional or pre fab. it was here when i moved in but i do know when they built the house they had them build the fireplace. i guess hardwoods bc people say they burn cleaner. what kind of woods are best to burn? thanks
  4. Bluerubi

    Bluerubi Member

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    I use an insert for a primary source of heat for 3000 sqft, but in an emergency it doesn't cut it since the blower doesn't work. When things go bad, I'll take a free standing stove over my vc Merrimack every time.

    I have the insert rigged for use with generator power, but I'd rather not have to rely on electricity when the power goes off in the middle of the night.
  5. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    Chittenden, VT
    Hello Carter,

    Welcome to the forum. First, it sounds you do not have your wood ready yet. Please be aware that modern EPA stoves require dry wood to function properly but you can rarely buy any. Wood only seasons when it has been cut, split and stacked with lots of sun and wind exposure for at least one year (some species like oak require 2). When you shop around ask the dealer whether the wood fulfills those conditions. I would also recommend to be there when the wood gets delivered. Split a few pieces and with a moisture meter take a reading in the center of the freshly exposed surface. Ideally, it should read 20% or less although I would also be ok with 25% in your situation. Otherwise, reject the load (but clarify that before!). There are other options like Biobricks that can be bought at Tractor Supply for example but they are rarely cost effective. If you do not have the wood lined up I would think about getting that done now and install a stove in the spring when potentially you can also get some better deals.

    Other thoughts:
    Be aware that most inserts rely on a blower to effectively move the heat to the room. If you want to have backup heat during power outages a freestanding stove in front of the fireplace will work much better and will be cheaper, too. If you are set on an insert look at the PE Super as it does convect the heat well even without the blower. The farther an insert sticks out into the room the better it will work without electricity. Napoleon 1402 insert would be worth looking at.
    What is your climate; how cold does it get in your place? If your house is as well insulated as you say and it does not get too cold a medium size insert between 2 and 2.5 cu ft should be enough. Lots to choose from here. Options would be: the Osburn 2200, PE Super, Napoleon 1402, Regency I2400, Boston Enviro 1700 to just name a few. You will also need to include a full liner from the insert to the top of the chimney. That will be a bit tricky since your flue is so narrow. If you have an exterior chimney it is highly recommended to insulate the liner for better draft and less creosote formation. You may need to resort to pour-in insulation, though.
    If you post a picture of your fireplace we will also be able to give you some more suggestions.
  6. carter

    carter New Member

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    I was reading a few articles. Do you have to install a liner in the chimney? And what is the best kind of wood that i need to start cutting?
  7. carter

    carter New Member

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    I was reading a few articles. Do you have to install a liner in the chimney? And what is the best kind of wood that i need to start cutting?
  8. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    For proper draft with a modern stove, a liner should be installed (also improves safety, less creosote, easier to clean, lots of reasons for doing it).

    Also, any wood, when properly seasoned will burn just fine for you. However, hardwoods have more BTU's per cord.

    pen
  9. carter

    carter New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2012
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    is it true that pine wood is bad to burn in the fire place insert? does anyone know anything about the drolet escape 1800i?
  10. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    If it is seasoned, there is nothing to worry about with burning pine. Pine has a bad reputation from folks trying to burn it when it hasn't been cut, split, and stacked in a good drying location / manner for a year.

    As far as specific info on the drolet, I'll change your thread title to help this thread attract folks who may know about the unit.

    pen

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