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Advice? Rebuilding Lange 6302A Red Porcelain Wood Stove

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by LuckyJim, Nov 27, 2013.

  1. LuckyJim

    LuckyJim New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2013
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Greenville, NY 12083
    Hello everyone!

    I bought a (Danish) Lange 6302A red porcelain coated, cast iron wood stove about 34 years ago, and still think it's the highest quality and most efficient wood stove I've ever seen. It went unused for a number of years due to a geographical move, but I now want to install it in my son's new house now. Before I do, I'd like to completely disassemble it, re-cement the panels and replace all the hardware. That brings up two questions:

    1) What do I use, standard boiler cement?

    2) What type of hardware (screws & nuts) do I use? Because Lange stopped exporting these fine stoves when the EPA started getting goofy back in the early '80s, I can't find any illustrated parts manuals, specs, or anything.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks,

    Jim

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,099
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    Use black furnace cement - Rutland black is my old favorite.

    It is possible to squeeze it into the seams from the inside if you don't want to take the stove apart. However, if you decide to rebuild totally, you can simply use regular metric bolts from the hardware store or McMaster-Carr for the replacements. If you want to step up a grade, you can use hardened bolts for the leg mounting, etc. but regular should do the job just fine also.

    You should be able to get enough of the old ones out to determine what the metric thread side is.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
  4. LuckyJim

    LuckyJim New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2013
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    3
    Loc:
    Greenville, NY 12083
    Thanks Webbie & Begreen!

    Sorry to take so long to respond, but I'm recuperating from a brain aneurysm I suffered 10/10/13, and some days I have more ambition than others.

    I always loved this stove. I'm hoping I don't have trouble getting it apart without doing any damage, particularly since most parts are no longer available. I just want it to be in top shape for my son to start using.
  5. defiant3

    defiant3 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2010
    Messages:
    414
    Loc:
    No. NH
    Woodman's won't know thread pitch I'm afraid, but it hardly matters. Simply replace nuts and bolts with common 3/8 hardware. Works every time for me!
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Jim, I'm glad you are recovering. I wouldn't tear it apart unless a rebuild is indicated. If it just needs liners or a baffle replacement I don't think it needs to be taken apart to do that.
  7. LuckyJim

    LuckyJim New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2013
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Greenville, NY 12083
    Hi again. Thanks for the good wishes Begreen.

    I decided to take it completely apart and re-cement it because of the age of the unit, years of use, and since I could see a couple very small spots that the cement was gone from the last time I burned it. I wanted my son to have the advantage of (functionally) a brand new stove with no worries regarding safety, as well as true airtight efficiency.

    Turns out the 4 bolts that hold this stove together don't take much of a beating!! They came out quite easily with a bit of PB Blaster, and looked fine for reuse, which surprised the Hell out of me! The other surprise I got was finding a floor plate to the stove, under which was a layer of some kind of fine particulate that looks more like cement dust than sand. Since I have no idea what it is, having completely disassembled, cleaned, and inspected the stove, we're going to put it right back under there before cementing it back together this weekend, unless someone has other info.

    I sure wish more parts were available for these stoves, for future reference.
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    I wish they still made Lange stoves. These were well made, good heating and looking stoves.

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