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Ahhh.....warm house.....stove was the right call!

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by NH_Wood, Oct 30, 2010.

  1. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
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    2,602
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    southern NH
    Hi all! Got to 29* last night. Got a good fire going last night at 2230 on a small bed of coals. Filled the box up full with ash, maple, and cherry. Woke up at 0630 and house was 74*, and right now (0830) stove top still at 300*, and a big bed of coals in the stove. Raked the coals to the front, and I'm letting them burn down now. I'm very happy with the decision to put in the wood stove last spring, and super glad I went with the soapstone - the stones stay hot for such a long time - I figure if after 10 h, if I still can't rest my hand on the stove top for more than a second or so, things are real good! Still wondering how the stove will perform in the middle of the winter - especially wondering how many times per day I'll need to load the stove. I'd love to get away with one big load early in the am, one mid-sized load in the afternoon, and another big load at night. But, I'm assuming I'll need to load 4 times per day once the real cold hits. Time will tell! My wife is also super happy - she was questioning my obsessive gathering of wood during the past two years, but now she's telling me how glad she is that we have so much wood and she's loving the difference in wood heat vs. our old pellet stove or oil. Life is good! Cheers!

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  2. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    Good deal NH_Wood, it's always nice waking up to a warm house. We still have our pellet stove but the wife likes the wood stove heat more.


    zap
  3. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    Thanks Zap - we sold our pellet stove to my cousin - young guy, starting a family. He has all electric heat, so I gave him a super deal on my Harman P61A with a 1.5 ton pellets - just finished doing the install for him a couple weeks ago - he is much happier! We've noticed a great difference in the wood heat vs. pellets - we have a pretty good size house - 2000sqft open concept downstairs and another 100sqft upstairs. Our downstairs in more uniformly warm, and the upstairs was 62* this morning. Much better than we ever had with pellets. Cheers!
  4. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
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    10,825
    Both the wood and pellet stoves are basement installs so once we bought the property I cut on and the price of pellets kept going up we went with wood. We burn more wood with a basement install but it heats the whole house, Jan. 2010 will be one full year since the oil company put some in the tank.



    zap
  5. heatwise

    heatwise Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2009
    Messages:
    411
    Loc:
    ohio
    that sounds great. its good to be that far in front on the wood, never hurts to have some thats been around a whyle. nice stove as well. thats a good size firebox . and with wood heat its nice to be able to get it warmer without feeling like your breaking the bank or being wastefull. pete
  6. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Feb 14, 2007
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    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    NH_Wood, glad to know you like the stove. I do hope you like it as well when the outside temperature is about 30 degrees colder.
  7. Needshave

    Needshave Member

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    Western Massachusetts
    Do you think the mansfield would be overkill for 1500 square feet?
  8. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    That might depend upon the house. If not insulated well or poor windows, etc., then a Mansfield would probably not be overkill. If good insulation, I do think it would be a bit too big. I hope this helps Jeff.
  9. Needshave

    Needshave Member

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    Loc:
    Western Massachusetts
    The house is not built yet so it should be well insulated. We're hoping to build next year a timber frame with stress skin siding about 1500 square feet. I've been flip floping on the type of wood heat I want. I went from a indoor boiler to a masonary heater. Now I'm back to the boiler. If we go this route I want a soapstone stove for power outages, sub zero weather and just plain old watching the fire. I like the heritage and the mansfield. Just thinking the mansfield may be a bit to much.
  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Jeff, you really owe it to yourself to look closely at the Woodstock Fireview for that house. Keep in mind too that if you buy from Woodstock they will give you a 6 month guarantee; if you don't like the stove for some odd reason, you get your money back and then could go another route. However, I highly doubt you would consider shipping it back to them because it is such a great stove.

    Woodstock Fireview
  11. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    Dennis - yes, I'm very much looking forward to how the Mansfield warms the house in the real NH cold. We just added blown insulation to the entire attic - we brought it to an R61 (yup, R61!). I have low ceiling as well - about 7'4". I'm assuming I can keep the 2000sqft main level pretty warm, but the upper 1000sqft is another story. We'll see. Jeff - I don't think the Mansfield would be overkill - but depends on house layout too - nice to go larger and not need it, than smaller and need the extra heat. I had considered the Woodstock Fireview, but the folks at Woodstock told me that the stove would be too small for my needs (I had assume this was the case before calling, but wanted to hear their point of view. I think the Fireview is rate for up to 1500sqft or so (correct me if I'm wrong Dennis) - so, you'd be at the upper limit with your new house. But...I've read a lot of reviews for the Fireview indicating that it can heat more than that area - but, again, depends on a lot of factors. Cheers!
  12. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I think the largest area I've heard about the Fireview heating was maybe around 2,300 sq. ft. don't remember for sure but was over 2,000 definitely. So in a new home, they usually are better insulated and I doubt there would be a problem heating it with a Fireview. Now with the new Woodstock stove coming, that will probably be a bit too much heat for that sized home.

    That is some serious insulation in the ceiling! I'll be it will feel like a blanket over you and keep you nice and warm.
  13. sauer

    sauer New Member

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    SE WI
    The fireview heats my 50s ranch (2000sqft) up untill it gets down to the teens. I also plastic my windows. If it gets below that the mansfield downstairs gets some attention.
  14. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Happiness is a roaring fire in a woodstove on a cold day . . .
  15. Needshave

    Needshave Member

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    Western Massachusetts
    Just came back from the local stove shop. My delema. Buy the stove now for the tax credit and store it untill the new home is built. Or wait untill the home is built then buy a stove. It may take a couple years before the new house is ready to move in. I'd save about $900 with the tax credit. If I had wads of cash laying around it's a no brainer. With all the demands on our money with building a home I'm reluctant to spend $3k now. Decisions, decisions.
  16. CALJREICH

    CALJREICH New Member

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    I think to be eligible for the tax credit you must buy it and have it installed in your primary residence. You must own the home. I believe that is correct.

    check IRS form 5695 here is part of the instructions

    2009 Form 5695
    Residential Energy Credits
    ... see instructions. Cat. No. 13540P Form 5695 (2009) Form 5695 (2009) Page 2 Before You ... c on that line .. 29 Form 5695 (2009) Form 5695 (2009) Page 3 General Instructions ... on this page. Purpose of Form Use Form 5695 to figure and take your ...
    http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f5695.pdf - 107.2KB

    You may be able to take a credit of 30% of the costs paid or incurred in
    2009 for any qualified energy efficiency improvements and any
    residential energy property. The credit is limited to a total of $1,500 for
    tax years 2009 and 2010.
    Qualified energy efficiency improvements. Qualified energy efficiency
    improvements are the following building envelope components installed
    on or in your main home that you owned during 2009 located in the
    United States if the original use of the component begins with you and
    the component can be expected to remain in use at least 5 years.
    c Any insulation material or system that is specifically and primarily
    designed to reduce heat loss or gain of a home when installed in or on
    such a home.
    c Exterior windows (including certain storm windows and skylights).
  17. Needshave

    Needshave Member

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