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  1. USMC80

    USMC80 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2013
    Messages:
    842
    Loc:
    New Jersey
    Looking at purchasing a Pacific Energy Super insert and see that you can either install it using the air supply from the room or an outside air supply. Im new to this stuff and was wondering which way is the better way?

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  2. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2008
    Messages:
    3,367
    Loc:
    Salisbury, MD
    OAK (Outside Air Kit) is recommended when your house is super tight, mostly new construction unless the person really did some work to an old house, since you have an older house that probably has its share of air leaks you would not need an OAK.

    OAK's are heated topics like cat vs non-cat around here with everyone's opinion being different.

    Some will say that having an OAK will not have your insert pulling cold air out of those drafts, keeping your room warmer. http://www.chimneysweeponline.com/hooa.htm
  3. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    15,246
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    Keep in mind that an OAK can always be added, later on down the road.
  4. bag of hammers

    bag of hammers Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,188
    Loc:
    Northern ON
    When I built the hearth for my free-standing stove (pedestal) I added the OAK connection (under the pedestal and through the floor) just 'cause I knew it would be a pain to retrofit an OAK later (the hearth is layers of plywood, durock, thinset, tile, etc.). This connection currently just drops into the crawl space and is capped for now, until I get around to it. But since the stove has been running fine without it, it's not been a panic to finish it. I still have to connect it to the vent hood on the outside wall (already there) and I do plan to test drive the stove with the OAK in the next burning season.

    There's lots of OAK related discussion and opinion here and elsewhere - it seems to be a recurring topic. As Jags posted, this is something you can do anytime. I'm just adding a bit of noise based on my (non-insert) install experience - it there's anything you can do now to accommodate an OAK in future (that might make your life a bit easier then) it might be something to think about, maybe anything that would save you from having to pull the stove later, etc...? I have no idea if that would apply to your particular stove, or inserts in general, but just throwing it out there fwiw....
    Jags likes this.
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Welcome to the forum USMC.

    We've had OAK and not had it. For the most part, I like it without the OAK but there are times that they are excellent. One of the biggest things is claimed that an OAK will cut down on drafts in the house because you are drawing air from the outside rather than from in the house. Bear in mind that if you draw air from in the house, that air has to be replaced so will be replaced with cold air.

    Probably the biggest drawback is sometimes in windy conditions they can cause a problem. However, that does not always happen. We had a few problems with this and is one reason with our last install that I removed the OAK. And now after some remodeling and adding of lots of insulation we are burning less wood and the house staying warmer.

    Another problem that can crop up without the OAK is if the house is tight and then the clothes drier running plus maybe an exhaust fan or two (cooking stove and bathroom), you create a negative pressure and the stove does not get the draft it needs. Sometimes that can cause smoke smell in the house. Naturally the worst time is spring and fall when the outside air temperature is higher than mid-winter so draft is already compromised a bit.

    Like Jags stated, you can always add one later if you don't put one in at the start.


    A much bigger worry for you would be the fuel. What are you going to burn? Do you have the wood on hand now? If not, you should. Not only should, but really it is necessary. Burning wood is not like burning oil or gas. You can't just go out and get some when you need it. Even if you buy your wood, it should be bought a year in advance. That is because wood sellers, no matter what they say, normally do not have very good wood. So do put a lot of thought into the fuel you will be using. Also go into The Wood Shed on this forum for lots of good information on the wood supply.

    Good luck.
    NortheastAl, fox9988 and etiger2007 like this.
  6. USMC80

    USMC80 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2013
    Messages:
    842
    Loc:
    New Jersey
    Thanks for the info savage, Yes I always have wood on hand as I was burning 4-5 cords a year with the furnace. I could burn anything in that thing though so im hoping that the wood i just split will be ready to burn in the new insert next year
  7. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    That's great that you have wood on hand. We always recommend people have a 3 year supply on hand. The benefits of this are great even if it causes some extra work at the start. Once you get there it is easy sledding from that point on.
  8. dave_376

    dave_376 Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2012
    Messages:
    110
    Loc:
    central Ct
    not sure if this helps but I found it on you tube its about Air Supply.


  9. Heatsource

    Heatsource Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2011
    Messages:
    757
    Loc:
    Northern CA
    but it is much harder to do after the fact in many cases!
  10. westkywood

    westkywood Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2009
    Messages:
    366
    Loc:
    Kentucky
    I've got an OAK and love it. I have an old home and I'll take anything I can get to reduce drafts in the house. I was fortunate to have my OAK on the east side of my house. The wind around here rarely blows from the east so I've noticed no affects from wind. Another thing to consider is not to allow the vent outside to get blocked by snow.

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