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All Nighter Mid Moe Restoration Questions

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Smoke Stack, Dec 1, 2013.

  1. Smoke Stack

    Smoke Stack Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2013
    Messages:
    68
    Loc:
    Central Massachusetts
    I have just started burning wood in my All Nighter, Mid Moe, stove. The stove is in great shape and I have decided that I will do a full restoration project in the off season. I tend to get bored.

    Today, I replaced all the fire brick on the inside. After removing the bottom course, I noticed there was some sort of insulation barrier underneath the bricks. Does anyone know what this material may be? When I got it out it was almost like that 1/2" thick sound proof board made of compressed materials. Anyway, it got trashed as I think they built the stove around it because it would not fit through the door no matter how I maneuvered it. Would it be safe to just put the bricks on the bottom of the steel stove? That's what I did, but I'll wait until someone says it will be ok before I fire it up again.

    My cast door does not have the baffle on the inside. Could this be an earlier model? It has the All Nighter logo with Moe on the front and the two air intake dials.

    I have seen the You Tube video with the guy and his All Nighter on the fork truck. He shows an inner plate at the top just behind the door that keeps the smoke from exiting the stove when opening the door. While I had my fat head in the stove today I noticed two little tabs, one on each side, with a hole in them that looks like they are for that inner plate. I have never seen another All Nighter with that plate. I first thought that the stove in the video had a homemade modification. Now I think the stove either came with one or had an accessory. Maybe they all just got knocked off from loading wood? Maybe a bad design and everyone took them off? Any input would be greatly appreciated and I'll try to get some pics up this week of my set up.

    Thanks all!
    cclancer likes this.

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  2. Burnin Billy

    Burnin Billy New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2013
    Messages:
    1
    Loc:
    Maryland
    Do I have to replace the floor brick if I only want to replace the sides?
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    44,544
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    No, you can replace just the sides if the floor brick is in good shape.
  4. cclancer

    cclancer New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2014
    Messages:
    1
    Loc:
    Northeast ma
    Smoke stack. I have a mid moe with the same tabes but no baffel? Have you got anymore info on this. I also replaced my brick and saw the insulation below a thin layer of metal on the floor of my stove. Mine was in good shape so I did not mess with it.. When I open my door I almost always get some smoke out the door. I have seen the you tube video as well.
  5. Smoke Stack

    Smoke Stack Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2013
    Messages:
    68
    Loc:
    Central Massachusetts
    No I haven't dug too deep. There's not much info on these stoves on the internet. I didn't have a thin layer of metal under my brick. Just that insulation material.

    I've found that keeping the wood length to around 18'' and keeping it towards the back of the stove helps with the smoke when you open the door. Also, I always open the door after the flue damper is open and I always open the door slowly. When you open it too fast, it creates the flow of air out of the stove. I bet that front smoke baffle works real well. I'm going to make one in the off season.
  6. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Messages:
    1,419
    Loc:
    NE PA
    The front plate you're referring to lowers the door top so the exhaust vent remains higher than the door opening. The flap swings open to allow larger pieces to fit in.
    There are brochures and manuals in the Hearth Wiki section if you haven't found them.
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/wiki/all-nighter-stove-co/
    Some manufacturer history in the Fisher section using the search feature.

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