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Am I burning my Buck 21 too hot?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by stowy65, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. stowy65

    stowy65 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2010
    Messages:
    16
    Loc:
    Raleigh, NC
    So I have had the Buck online for exactly one month. Since it is an insert, I can only get a hot temperature read off the ceramic glass with my infrared thermometer. The hottest I get is tonight at 730 degrees. Is this too hot? Is this not a true reading? The hottest reading I have gotten off the metal on the side is 480. What are your opinions on this? Can I burn hotter?

    75% of the time, we have the primary air closed down around 80%. That is the only way we get secondary burns. I worry about creosote build-up. Should I be opening her up more? I blow through some wood if the air control lets too much in.

    Also, can I close my primary air down all the way when I go to bed and will it continue to burn?

    Thank you!

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  2. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Well, my stove top is cruising at 600 and the glass is reading 804 in the highest place. The problem is I'm not sure if there is a direct correlation between the glass temps and your stove temps. According to my stove and my setup you are OK.

    I'd say if you have your stove about 80% closed on a full load then you are burning pretty close to the way I do (for the right or for the wrong). Some people are able to close the air down completely, others don't / cant.

    Is your glass staying clean? I will get a bit of white soot on mine that I clean off every few weeks. Brown or black soot on the glass would indicate you are burning a bit cool or turning down the air too far.
  3. scoooter

    scoooter Member

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    Loc:
    Central Md
    I have been told that the best place on the 21 to get a true reading is on the front directly above the handle. I have only had a couple fires so far and I am using a wired thermometer that goes into one of the front vents and sits on top of the inside "layer" of steel.

    Scott
  4. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

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    Just Outside the Blue Line
    With the IR I think the glass is the best place to get a stove temp. It is always exposed to the heat of the fire, so you really get the best and most consistent temperature info that way. I think glass temps in the 700-800º range sound normal. It's usually the hottest part of the stove on most newer designs, or so I am told.
  5. stowy65

    stowy65 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2010
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    Raleigh, NC
    Thank you all for your posts. So what is your opinion of closing the primary air down all the way at night?
  6. scoooter

    scoooter Member

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    Loc:
    Central Md
    Sorry I can't answer that one yet. I haven't gotten to that point. :)

    Scott
  7. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    To me, if you can close it down all the way for the night and you wake up in the morning still with clear glass, then you are fine. If your glass turns brown / black at night then you are closing it down to far.

    pen
  8. Big Al

    Big Al New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2010
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    Loc:
    Rhode Island
    Try closing it down all the way one day when you are home and awake and observe the fire and your flue outside for the duration of the burn. If there are flames/secondaries present til the coaling stage and no smoke out of the flue, than you're good to go for the overnight. Of course, outside temps, condition of wood all contribute to how much you can dial it back on any given day. Experiment and have fun.

    Al

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