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  1. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    1. stove top thermometers are good, but how close do we have to follow them. If anything, they can confuse newbies and cause us to get up and mess with the controls too much, especially when the temps get too high. My thermometer says that anything above 600 is too hot, forcing me to turn down the air.will higher temps ACUALLY hurt the stove within reason?
    I can see woodstoves w/o a glass door, having to go by them, and users of certain stoves.

    Last night it dropped to 19 deg, so its getting a bit colder, but the shoulder temps are yet to arrive, any way, I felt restricted this morning, constantly trying to stay under 600. thx- Brian.

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  2. remkel

    remkel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Messages:
    1,459
    Loc:
    Southwest NH
    I think you are overthinking this process. I usually shut down the stove when it reaches 600, but once I shut it down the temps will climb slightly. Temps going over 600 for a period of time after the reload will not hurt your stove. I would recommend that you just let her sit for a while and you will see the temps come down over time. My stove is in the basement, so once I see the temps level off I pretty much leave it for the cycle (I don't need that much exercise).

    Should you see the temperatures take off, then you can fiddle with the controls to try and control the secondaries a bit. Remember, we do a lot of work to get ready for the wood burning season- it is ok to sit back and just enjoy once that Castine is in cruising mode.
  3. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    5,740
    Loc:
    Northern MI - in the mitten
    Previous owners here obviously didn't use a thermometer.
    I have no idea how they ran the stove except for the clue they left.......... one quite large popped weld in the back of the stove. That pretty much negated the somewhat primitive air control and allowed the stove to run with unregulated air, until they gobbed some refractory cement in the crack.
    That's how I discovered the crack. The cement had deteriorated and was falling out of the crack onto the floor at the back of the stove which caused the same problem for me.
    There are reasons for temp. limits on these things, and if more heat is needed, perhaps a bigger stove should be considered.
    How do you know how hot the thing is by looking at it, or at the fire?
    Overfiring your stove may cost more in dollars and inconvenience than it's worth, IMHO.
    Consult the manual for the Castine, it may tell you what the top end is and if not, call your dealer or Jotul.
    Thermometers are guides. My thermo. tells me that just under 575 is beginning overfire state, but this stove has seen more than 300 above that (prior to having the weld fixed) w/o glowing or shooting into space. I checked.:coolsmile: I have no manual for my stove and have had no luck obtaining info on it, but I tend to keep the stove under 700 since being repaired. Just seems reasonable to me, rather than running it to peg the gauge just because I need more heat.
    Besides, the faster/hotter I run the stove, the faster the wood goes away. That's bad juju. :lol:
  4. HotCoals

    HotCoals Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
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    3,355
    Loc:
    Rochester,Ny.
    ^^^That guy gets it.
    Should be no reason to run a wood stove super hot just because you can...unless you want to show off..I'm guilty of that..lol.
    I have had company stand next to my stove on a long slow burn and say I don't feel much heat..then I turn up the air...even though it was like 80 in the room with the stove in it...they soon move..lol.
  5. adrpga498

    adrpga498 Minister of Fire

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    Nov 18, 2005
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    866
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    New Jersey
    HItting 600* is a non _issue for the stove you have. Often times mine hits 700 then I cut it back and she'll settle in between 500 & 600. You will see different peaks in temps as you have different size splits, loads, and types of wood. So not to worry about 600, 800 is time to start watching your burning habits.
  6. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2010
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    1,438
    Loc:
    NWI office - 2 Heritages; Chicago home - Woodstock
    Wow! I hear people talk about 600+ burn temps. That must just blast the room immediately in a wall of heat. I doubt I ever go over 450, and when she's warm, I move objects away and give plenty of space. Sounds great though...700 degrees. I'd have a baby gate around that thing for liability purposes if company was there. Young kids may get hurt and silly adults who've been drinking may not respect a 700 degree dragon as they should.
  7. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    Thx for some answers. Time will tell how the stove ticks. I need to learn wood id, so I know what I am currently burning, (i have ash &oak; for shoulder.) Night #1, 7 hr burn, nite #2 - 5 hr burn.

    When I really load it up, takes a while to really get going (wood is seasoned + mm confirms) seems like I'm suffocating the stove w/alot of wood, preparing for a night burn.

    I also think my stove top thermometer is off by -100 deg. I'm purchasing an ir meter to get more accurate readings to confirm.
  8. adrpga498

    adrpga498 Minister of Fire

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    866
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    New Jersey
    Takes about 15 to 20 minutes to fully char a realod full for the overnighter.
  9. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    Yes, BUT, I begin to shut it down in 1/3 increments, when I get to around 1/4 open, there is a weakening of fire (expected) and really just smolters. (not expected) Box is filled front to back, about 2"from rear chambers and 3" below front chambers. Thermo temps between 425- 550
  10. SlyFerret

    SlyFerret Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
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    1,440
    Loc:
    Delaware, Ohio
    If I want to know temperature, I use my handheld IR thermometer.

    If I just want to get a quick feel for where I am in the burn cycle, I take a peek at my stovetop magnetic thermometer. I don't so much pay attention to the numbes. The motion of the needle is what I'm concerned with there.

    I don't suggest getting too hung up on watching the temps constantly. Use it to alert you to trouble, but once you get a feel for your stove, running it should be a little more organic, and less by the numbers.

    -SF
  11. adrpga498

    adrpga498 Minister of Fire

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    New Jersey
    You can get a little closer to top baffle. I don't go any lower then 1/3 rd from total closed on the air. Less the a 1/4 close runs the risk of smolder as you mentioned.
  12. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,163
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Each stove + flue system is going to have its own sweet spot. And this is going to vary even with the same stove depending on the wood and the outside temps. We couldn't turn our Castine all the way down until it was in the 20s outside. Use your eyes as much as the stove top temp. Turn the air down until the flames are lazy and wafting ghostlike above the wood. And don't worry about hitting 650 or even 700F on the stove top. This stove can take it just fine. During cold weather we normally cruised about 650F with occasional forays up to 700F.
  13. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    NW Ontario
    Lots of gadget guys on this forum with flue and stove top thermometers and IR guns. My OCD is so bad that I cannot use them... never have. Only seat-of-the-pants burning here. Back in the pre-EPA days cherry red meant hot, orange was cause for concern, and yellow really kicked it up a notch. Smells and noises were important clues as well.

    Now with a glass door one has a lot better feel for what is happening or is about to happen. I look for the sweet spot where the fine ash film on the burn tubes have a nice orange hue. Hot is when the burn tube metal glows cherry.
  14. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    agreed, I was forced to leave it open 1/4, BUT about 3 hours later, smoke alarm was going off, and the stove was rocking at 650, and I guess more paint was curing...??? I have been burning in cycles, raking coals to the front and loading pretty tight.
  15. remkel

    remkel Minister of Fire

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    Southwest NH
    For a while, each time you hit a new high score (temperature) some paint may cure. No big deal.
    I can shut my F600 completely down and still cruise in the 600-650 range (expecially the past couple days with temps in the low teens). The stove is cranking today, and the house is a comfortable 70-75 degrees.

    You will get more comfortable the longer you play with the stove. One day it will all click and it will become habit.
  16. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Take all the temps with a grain of salt . . . they're notorious for not being spot on accurate . . . I use the thermos more as a guide than an absolute . . . when in doubt I use my IR thermo to confirm if things are getting too hot or not.

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