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Another reason I love my T5

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by gogreenburnwood, Feb 3, 2012.

  1. gogreenburnwood

    gogreenburnwood Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    Messages:
    36
    Loc:
    Sodus NY
    I'm sure everyone has done this, I got up this morning and there were remnants of the big log I had put in last night, so I smoothed out the coals and put some 2-3 inch branches in. I had to leave suddenly and didn't have time to do the "start new wood" process of letting it get burning good and gradually turning down the air, I had to shut it down right away. I glanced at the chimney as I was leaving and there were just wisps of smoke, since it really didn't have time to get any draft going. When I cam back about 2 hours later I figured there would be a good amount of smoke coming out since I was sure that everything was just sitting there smoldering. I was surprised when I saw no smoke. I figured the fire just went out. When I got in the house I was really surprised to see the stove sitting there cruising along at 600 degrees all by itself. It had self started itself. Now I'm sure that in the process I created extra smoke while it was starting but it is very comforting to know that if needed you can load this stove up and shut it down right away if necessary and it will take care of itself. Almost makes me fell like I'm not needed.

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  2. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    9,138
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    We here at the hearth are very addicted to the perfect burn, the cleanest burn, and we just like to fiddle with our stoves a lot more than the ordinary person. This addiction can waver near the end of the season and I've been known to stuff a stove full of wood (on top of a couple of inches of coals), let the flames appear for a couple of minutes, and then shut the draft to zero and go to bed. Oddly, in the morning the house is warm and the glass is clean so I know that at some point the fire decided to burn and burn clean.

    Good wood is hard to keep from burning when you set it on a few coals. That delay to full startup can actually help extend the burn time.
  3. madison

    madison Minister of Fire

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    Congrats! We like pictures ... hint hint Thanks
  4. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Carver, MA.
    Yes the T-5 has good manners! I get it going and running steady in 20 mins before I leave for work around 4:30AM.. Makes my life easy for sure!

    Ray
  5. Oldhippie

    Oldhippie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2011
    Messages:
    560
    ugh!
  6. jetmech

    jetmech Member

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    Dec 8, 2007
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    210
    Loc:
    Dillsburg PA
    Thanks Raybonz, i leave for work at 4:30 as well, nice to know i have company...
  7. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
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    Loc:
    Carver, MA.
    There are quite a few of us commuters to Boston and it gets much heavier after 6AM.. I start work at 6AM and commute ~47 miles been doing this for 4 years.. I bring a 16 oz. travel mug of coffee and listen to all the sports, news, traffic and weather.. Lock on the cruise control and take my time.. Usually home by ~3:30PM.. Boston wages are much better than my area so it's worth the trip!

    Ray
  8. ironworker

    ironworker Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2011
    Messages:
    136
    Loc:
    Upstate NY
    Same happened to me one morning before going to a Jet game, after stuffing my stove, my buddy showed up to pick me up before the fire really got going, and with all the wood inside I knew I had to shut the air off in fear of over firing with no one home, so being I burn well seasoned wood and never have creosote build, I did not mind a cold smoldering fire, and was pleasontly surprised to come home after 10 hours to a nice warm house with clean glass and hot coals.
    PS I to go to work at 4:30 am.
  9. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Carver, MA.
    I am always amazed how easy it is to use the T-5 compared to the CDW.. The hardest part was getting used to burning smaller fires in moderate temps like we've had this fall and winter here.. I find it best to operate the stove when the temps are in the teens but that hasn't happened much this winter so it's smaller fires much of the time.. This allows me to burn cleanly where my cat stove you could stuff full and run very low air..
    Looks like I am in good company for my commute! It's not that bad once you get used to it.. I am usually asleep by 10PM and sleep about 6 hrs on my work days..

    Ray
  10. Oldhippie

    Oldhippie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    560
    I give you early birds huge credit, I have all the respect in the world for hard working people making commutes like that. I did it for many years, and hour and 20 each way through a lot of heavy traffic every day. Am I glad those days are over.

    Now I telecommute. But recently I had to leave the house and venture out to a business meeting near rush hour. I couldn't believe the traffic.

    But at 4:30 I'm still in dreamland ...and staying warm on hot coals.
  11. albertj03

    albertj03 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    539
    Loc:
    Southern Maine
    My Super 27 takes good care of itself for the most part too. Of course I spend time sitting with the stove turning down the air just at the precise time until the air is almost down to totally closed. I feel that I have mastered the art of the perfect burn in my stove. Then, when I'm not home and my wife happens to venture into the basement and notices the fire is just about out, she just grabs any old pieces of wood and tosses a couple in the stove. Never touches the air control, besides to make sure it's almost to zero, and walks off. She check the stove if she goes back down there, she might not.

    When I come home I hear the words that make me panic "I put a couple pieces of wood in the stove when you were gone." Expecting to find a smoldering, creosote producing mess I go down to the basement and never fail, there is either a nice, perfect fire going or it's down to a nice bed of coals with clean glass.

    Gives me piece of mind to know that my wife can throw wood in with the air at almost zero, walk away and not create a creosote factory.
  12. certified106

    certified106 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,472
    Loc:
    Athens, Ohio
    +1!!!!
    This is one of the reasons I have grown to love my T6! Previously anytime my wife would load the Dutchwest it would be a smoldering smoking mess when I got home which resulted in us getting in big discussions :) about it and her just refusing to load the stove anymore. Now with the T6 I have yet to find a smoking chimney when I get home and she absolutely loves the stove.

    I have on occasion thrown wood in quickly and walked away and thinking it was going to be smoking when I got back home however when I returned and hour later it was cranking along perfectly. It is truly one of the easiest stoves to operate that I have ever owned. With my Dutchwest you had to babysit it until everything was just right and then get the cat temp up high enough or it would turn into a smoking disaster that would never light off.
  13. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
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    I hear that Cert! That's a VERY touchy subject here too.. I love how easy it is to run this stove it can be a marriage saver lol.. Personally I love how nice the fire looks when it's rolling on secondaries! Just looking at the fire warms me in a psychological way!

    Ray
  14. Ash Man

    Ash Man New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2011
    Messages:
    35
    Loc:
    Spruce Grove, Alberta
    I just shared these comments with my wife, and said how all wife's must be the same. She then smacked me! Ouch!

    Our new T6 is the same. I'm amazed at how well mannered it is. I hardly worry at all when I come home and see that she has started a fire - ouch!

    Now if I convince her that it does matter which pile of wood she takes wood from...ouch!
  15. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Carver, MA.
    All the wood in my shelter is ready to burn plus I take care of that myself so that's not a concern for me.. In early spring when I near done burning my outside stacks get moved into the shelter and my new wood is delivered to be stacked outdoors.. When completely done burning I roll up the tarp sides and secure them until sometime in the fall.. It's a simple system and works well for me..

    Ray
  16. Ash Man

    Ash Man New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2011
    Messages:
    35
    Loc:
    Spruce Grove, Alberta
    I have a similar system, but made the comment to give my wife a reason to give another smack! Now that i am really getting into wood burning I will need to build another shed, as the one I have will not hold enough wood for a winter. This T6 changes everything! I've got an acre of poplar, but now need to start thinking about a long term plan to ensure I can keep my new stove happy.
  17. metalsped

    metalsped Burning Hunk

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    Loc:
    Quabbin Woods
    My father in law drives from Hubbardston, MA to the GE plant in Lynn every day... he leaves around 4a I think. I dont know how he does it.
  18. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    One mile at a time.. Listen to the radio and drink my coffee.. Not that bad unless you let it be.. As for Lynn I hate that city! I did some fancy street lighting there and it's a real zoo! When I went to city hall to talk to the wiring inspector I did find that to be a nice old building though otherwise it's not a place I will intentionally visit! Lot's of drunks and druggies there..

    Ray
  19. albertj03

    albertj03 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    539
    Loc:
    Southern Maine
    All of my wood is ready to burn but I use different wood at different times. Typically first thing in the morning I get a good mix of oak and maybe some maple going nice and hot, afternoon I might mix some oak and little locust and then at night it mostly locust and some oak. The sizes are important too, smaller splits in the morning to get things going quicker and large ones at night. I like to think of it as an art kind of like a wine maker picking their grapes. :)
  20. jetmech

    jetmech Member

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    Loc:
    Dillsburg PA
    Ive worked shift schedules all my life from 21:30 at night till 07:00 15:00 till midnite, right now im 05:30 till 14:00 as long as im in bed at a descent hour i am used to early bird hours. my wife wonders why i eat lunch at 10:00 i said welcome to my world.
  21. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Your system makes sense to me.. If I'm home I keep a small fire going with the smaller pieces along with stuff that doesn't stack well.. At night larger pieces of heavy wood work best especially stuff that coals well like oak and locust..

    Ray
  22. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Sounds like a rotating shift and hard to get adjusted to.. Man the military time has always killed me lol.. Even when in the military I had to think about the time but it does save confusion once you're used to it..

    Ray

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