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Another Seasoning Question............

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by woodchip, Oct 4, 2012.

  1. woodchip

    woodchip Minister of Fire

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    Knowing that larger splits take longer to dry out than smaller splits, many people split fairly small to get wood seasoned quickly when they do not have a load of well seasoned wood to burn. I have a friend here who had a stove installed a month ago and he only has a small amount of decent wood (less than a cord). He does have plenty of wood that may season for next fall, but I was wondering whether he should split it down more or saw the splits in half. I was thinking about halving the length of splits as wood dries quicker from the ends than the sides. I helped him get the wood (mostly willow) a couple of weeks ago.

    Any thoughts?

    (Out of interest, he has the same make stove as us, after seeing ours last winter with a load of free cherry keeping our lounge at a steady 85f during a cold spell........)

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  2. James02

    James02 Feeling the Heat

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    I'll be the first on this....I wouldn't cut in half, but maybe to the specs of the stove, 18" or 21" whatever the case may be.....Or his friend could swap out some seasoned wood for some unreasoned wood.....just sayin....
  3. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    You could make the splits smaller (here in the US I consider a small to medium split 3x3" to 5x5"). You could then season it as long as you possibly can, and when it's time to have to use it, mix it with pallet wood or mill ends. Even with these measures, it's gonna be moist and his flue will need inspected and cleaned often. Willow is a waterlogged wood when green. He may have to try and find someone to trade some with, or find a reputable dealer to buy some seasoned wood from (yeah, I know thats almost impossible to find).
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  4. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    It didn't sound too bad until I read that it is willow. We call that trash wood. High moisture content but dries relatively quick. Stinks to High Heavan and not much heat from it.
  5. cygnus

    cygnus Feeling the Heat

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    He really needs to find some dry wood. I think it will be a very frustrating season trying to burn the green stuff he has.
  6. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Oh the "learning curve".
    Having you to guide him thru it will be a big help.
    We all had to go thru it though.

    Small splits, ge it stacked & drying.
    "You burn what you got, seasoned or not" ;)
  7. woodchip

    woodchip Minister of Fire

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    I've offered him some of my dry wood to help him out, I know he'll help me in the future.

    Next big birch that comes my way will hopefully also end up in his new wood shed (which is virtually empty at present).

    I feel a bit guilty with a big stash of wood even though I've slogged so hard to get 3 years ahead.

    Dennis, I know how poor willow can be, but it was from a neighbour, so easy to get.

    I'll keep you posted as to his progress, I've mentioned the forum to him, and I suspect he'll join in time....... :)
  8. krex1010

    krex1010 Minister of Fire

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    In my experience people will try and burn what they have, nobody sits and let's wood dry for next heating season when they are out of wood in the season they are currently in. My advice would be to tell him to split it smaller and try to resist burning anything until the real heating season arrives, then mix the willow with the good stuff right from the start, this way he isn't left with nothing but wet willow through the dead of the winter. And scavenging pallets to mix in would be a great idea.
  9. swagler85

    swagler85 Minister of Fire

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    He could also buy some of those eco bricks to get though this season. Mixing those in with some of his wet wood would help him out.
  10. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Now you stop that bs.
    We all know how much work you put in to get that far ahead.
    We process wood, we "Know" how much work is involved..
    "Proud" but not guilty ;ex
    Backwoods Savage, Nixon and smokinj like this.
  11. firebroad

    firebroad Minister of Fire

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    Don't know if they have anything akin to ecobricks across the pond, but they pulled my uh-huh of the the fire, so to speak, last year. I would get two or three of them going, then add some less than perfect wood, and I had barely a half cup of creosote come spring cleaning. They are not cheap, but then neither is a chimney fire. ==c
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  12. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Woodchip, that is good of you to help him out. But as Dave stated, that is BS feeling guilty!!!! You worked hard to get that wood and to get enough to be 3 years ahead. You need to feel proud and not guilty. Many of us know how much work it is to get that wood and perhaps even harder in your area because of the laws you have to obey.

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