Another wood ID

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by learnin to burn, Jun 22, 2009.

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  1. learnin to burn

    learnin to burn
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    All 4 pics came from the same tree. I'm not sure how to describe the smell but it stinks. It is real strait grained and splits easy with the fiskers.

    Thanks
     

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  2. Wood Duck

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    Could this be Chestnut Oak? The bark looks right, and I think the wood does too. There is a lot of Chestnut Oak in PA.
     
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  3. SmokinPiney

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    Definately chesnut oak. It has a very distinct "nutty" smell to it when it's split. Splits easier than red oak too!
     
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  4. ansehnlich1

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    yep, chestnut oak, I sawed and split about 5 cord of it in March :)
     
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  5. learnin to burn

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    Thanks for the reply's guys. I'm guessing the seasoning time is about the same as white or red oak, is this correct?
     
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  6. LLigetfa

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    Around here we have a kind of Poplar they call Bam (Balm of Gilead) that has bark like that and real white wood. It can really stink like sour milk if diseased but never a nutty smell.
     
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  7. ansehnlich1

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    I split close to 5 cord of chestnut oak back in March and I won't be burning that until fall of 2010 at the earliest.

    I've found here in my part of the planet, outside Gettysburg PA, it is best to split and watch my wood dry for at LEAST a year before burning in my Jotul.
     
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  8. webby3650

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    I am sure that the wood you have there is Sassafras. I can't believe no else thought that! The red right under the bark, the dark stripe down the center are all dead give aways. It doesn't always smell great, it will smell different at various stages of seasoning.
     
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  9. Wood Duck

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    I have never seen a Sassafras in Pennsylvania that is anywhere near as large as that tree. I am sticking with Chestnut Oak.
     
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  10. learnin to burn

    learnin to burn
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    If it helps any the gain looks a lot like white or red oak and it has a slight greenish hue. When freshly split it did stink but I think I was picking up a slight odor of sweetness. Not sure if this pick will help but it is of the pile I was splitting. The smaller stuff is a combination of white and red oak on the left. On the right is silver maple.
     

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  11. Jags

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    That thar picture at the top be oak.
     
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  12. PA. Woodsman

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    I had seen this several days ago, but didn't have time to respond until now. At first, I also thought it to be Sassafras, but when I "expanded" the pictures and looked closely, I could see characteristics of Oak especially in the grain...I have never had Chestnut Oak to my knowledge, but have had Sassy, and it has that sweet aroma to it. Let's just say this-he'll be able to tell by the weight when it is dry; Oak will be much heavier than Sassafras, and the Sassy will pop from moisture pockets.
     
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  13. webby3650

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    Sassafras has a greenish tint to it, straight grain, a sweet smell and splits easy with an axe.
     
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