Antique Firewood

waynek Posted By waynek, Mar 29, 2009 at 4:47 PM

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  1. waynek

    waynek
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    Jan 15, 2009
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    whitepine.jpg

    Last year a friend of mine gave me a white pine bolt from an ancient tree that was among a group of trees discovered buried in a bog in northern Wisconsin. Carbon-dating determined the age of the trees to be 1,600 plus years old. The bolt that was given to me was cut off a larger piece that was eventually crafted into pieces of furniture.

    I cut some pieces with a bandsaw to be carved into various bird images. The remaining piece (not suitable for carving) was ceremoniously split with my Great-great grandfather's double-bit timber axe and splits were given to some members of my family. Each split had the carbon date, discovery date and location burned into the wood.

    I had 4 splits left and the temptation overcame me and I burned one in the old Round Oak Stove.
    Jackpine
     
  2. madrone

    madrone
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    Oct 3, 2008
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    Well, sure. If you waited any longer you'd need to install coal grate to burn it.
    So, how'd it burn?
     
  3. waynek

    waynek
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    Jan 15, 2009
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    I had the stove door open when the split burned...could not tell the difference from any other stick of wood. Only my mindset was different.
    Jackpine
     
  4. karri0n

    karri0n
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    Nov 18, 2008
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    Old underwater wood like that is worth a very pretty penny for making musical instruments. I'm not sure if white pine is the right kind of wood for that purpose, though.
     
  5. waynek

    waynek
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    Jan 15, 2009
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    Southern WI
    I do not know if white pine is used in the manufacture of musical instruments either. Other tree species such as Red oak, Hemlock and Yellow birch were pulled out of the same bog and I don't know if they are used in musical instruments.

    What is curious to me is a whole new industry has been developed to recover timber submerged in water. A local Department of Natural Resources Forester told me that he believes there are submerged "old growth" tree logs in the Wisconsin River and its tributaries worth millions of dollars. I replied --- I know, I have hit a few with my outboard motor.
    Jackpine
     
  6. Wet1

    Wet1
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    Apr 27, 2008
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    Scary to think S&S;Aqua-logger was ahead of his time. :cheese:
     
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