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Any tips on making a old stove more efficient?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by sapratt, Aug 16, 2008.

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  1. sapratt

    sapratt Feeling the Heat

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    I have a old Fisher stove. With finances tight I'm stuck with it for this winter. Is there anything I can do to
    make it more efficient and get me by this winter? From what I've read they eat alot of wood and that is something I don't
    have. I have 3 cord that will be ready this winter. I plan on replacing the stove next year when stoves go on sale
    and the tax check comes.

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Mainly it is a matter of burning right - if you are around the house, use smaller loads with more air. Don't turn it way down unless you have to.

    When burning bigger load, makes certain there is a big bed of embers....put the new wood in and burn with a lot of air for 20 minutes or more, then turn it down.

    A decent run of indoor stove pipe can help as well as a turn damper in the stove pipe - both, however, need a strong chimney on the end for best performance.
  3. sapratt

    sapratt Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks Craig, I was dead set on this stove before I found this web site and even after. But the more I read
    about how much wood the old stoves use and how much more heat the new stoves put out. I'm thinking
    I made a mistake going with this stove.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Don't fret too much no man. In this market you could easily resell it. A new stove like the Englander 30NC would probably save you a cord of wood over the season. So the payback is pretty nice.

    Otherwise, the best thing you can do on a budget is tighten up the house. Caulking and weatherstripping is cheap and often a very effective first step. Curtains or at least some plastic on the windows can help reduce heat loss.
  5. sapratt

    sapratt Feeling the Heat

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    For the most part the house isn't real drafty. The master bed room is the worst and it has replacement windows.
    I think we lose most of our heat through the attic. I was up there not long ago and could feel the cooler air coming
    up from the bathroom and the room the stove will be in.
  6. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Figger out where it's coming from, tighten it up and insulate it. There shouldn't be any free communication of air between your living space and your attic, and the attic floor should have the equivalent of R-19 on it as a minimum...more is better. Either batts or blown-in. Rick
  7. sapratt

    sapratt Feeling the Heat

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    I found where the air is leaking from. I think a little isalation and caulk around the leaks will make a big
    difference.
  8. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Good deal, no man...keep searching! Rick
  9. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, a delicate balance of cutting down air and cutting down the stovepipe damper along with a nice selection of well seasoned wood can get you some great heat with minimal pollution. I used some monster pieces of well seasoned oak in my Better n Bens and chugged that thing all night. Regardless, I ended up using some of that magic dust every week or so to keep the chimney clean.
  10. RedRanger

    RedRanger New Member

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    In the meantime, scrounge all the wood you can get for next year. And if it`s possible move the bed down to where the stove is for the winter. Why not? And the TV as well, at least you will be comfy this winter. :)
  11. sapratt

    sapratt Feeling the Heat

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    Well from what I've been told the stove will heat 2000sq. We have a 1300sq house and a fairly open floor plan.
    My plan was 24/7 burning but I think it will only be used when I'm home and no over night burns.
  12. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Burn dry wood with a good safe chimney setup and the Fisher will do fine. Just inspect the whole pipe often to make sure it isn't getting crapped up. People have been heating 24/7 with Fishers for thirty years now.

    Why they won't drive 30 year old cars but want to burn in thirty year old stoves is beyond me, but they do put out heat.
  13. kjsnooks

    kjsnooks New Member

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    I also have a Fisher stove. I love it! we have a 1300 sq ft house and last winter was colder and snowier and blowier than normal, i went through 3.5 to 4 cord of wood. and that was burning 24/7. run it right and its not bad. i checked the chimney for creosote, and it was minimal. Im about to clean it in a cpl days and ill know for sure, but a flashlight check didnt reveal it to be to bad at all. O i also burn pine, so good hardwood would be even better.

    Just my two cents on the fisher, I love em
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