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Anyone have info on Huskee 22 ton splitter repair parts

Post in 'The Gear' started by andybaker, Jan 2, 2009.

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  1. andybaker

    andybaker Feeling the Heat

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    I've got a Huskee 22 ton splitter and over the years I've managed to tear it up pretty good. The wedge is cracked and now dented, the metal stops to dislodge a stuck log are all twisted and the gas tank leaks. I've never replaced the hydraulic fluid or filter. How often should that be done? Where do you get a filter? I've talked to some small engine repair shops and it doesn't seem as though they have a lot of experience with them. I can't find replacement parts on line anywhere. Help would be appreciated.

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  2. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    tractor supply co. sales them should be able to get one there (when to change hydraulic fluid would depend on use)
  3. fattyfat1

    fattyfat1 New Member

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    you should be able to get a filter anywhere, they are pretty universal, (I get mine at the local logging store, auto parts store, tractor dealership, etc.) as far as the leaky gas tank, is it plastic or metal? Worn, dented, twisted, cracked steel parts are ALL FIXABLE. If it's steel, you can heat it up, straiten it, re-weld it, beat it. Thats the beauty of steel, no matter what you do to it, it can be re-manipulated and fixed very easily and cheaply.
  4. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Mostly you are looking at commodity items, or stuff that should be readily fixable...

    1. The wedge should be something the local welding shop can handle - take it to them and ask them to hit it with a hard surfacing rod and grind it back into shape, should come back as good or better than new...

    2. They should also be able to straighten and / or remake the log ejector (BTW, I'm surprised it gets damaged, I've hardly ever even touched mine w/ a log - I just pick the log up with the ram and mash it down again if needed, repeat a couple times... If that doesn't work just grab the log (valve in neutral) and wiggle it a bit...) My friend's hydraulic doesn't even have a log ejector, and I've never missed it...

    3. The gas tank should be something any OPE (Outdoor Power Equipment) shop can supply you with - might not look the same, but if all you want is to hold gas, who cares... As the earlier replies suggested, it may also be possible to repair the existing tank if it's metal, but it will probably be less expensive / lower hassle to just replace it. A good OPE shop will probably have some junked machine you can get a used tank off of for very short money, though you might then need to fab up a bracket, and / or modify what you have.

    4. The hydraulic fluid probably doesn't need changing often, as it doesn't get contaminated the way engine oil does, but it probably wouldn't hurt to change it every 2-3 years on general principles. The filter I'd change annually, again just on general principles... Any good automotive or hydraulic shop should have the filter - bring them the old one and ask them to match it... If they can't do so easily, most hydraulic shops will be able to sell you a complete filter and mounting block for a reasonable sum, which it's just a matter of basic plumbing to install...

    You are right, most small engine shops probably don't have a lot of experience w/ splitters as such, they aren't all that common compared to other OPE (i.e. lawnmowers or snowblowers) and are relatively reliable so they don't come in very often (or so my OPE guy tells me) however they are very much generic engines, so if you need service they should be quite able to fix the engine end. If there are hydraulic problems, any hydraulic shop should have no problem, or you can simply get replacement parts and change them out yourself - it's all "plumbing 101" level stuff, splitters are arguably one of the simplest kinds of OPE there is.

    Gooserider
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Yes, Tractor Supply will have or can get everything you need.
  6. Rich M

    Rich M New Member

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    Being a hydraulic filter (very high pressure) it is kind of a specialty item. Wix makes one that fits and is properly rated. Find an auto parts store that carries Wix brand filters, the part # is 51553.

    You can get a new wedge (as well as every other part) from Speeco 1-800-525-8322. The 22 ton wedge is part #LS401136.
  7. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    How do you figure a hydraulic filter is supposed to be very high pressure? At least on my splitters and the others I've looked at, it is located in the RETURN line between the cylinder and the tank. According to every site on hydraulic system design that I looked at when trying to decide what features to look at in a splitter, the return line is supposed to be at close to zero pressure - when the valve is in the extend or retract position, the fluid is just getting pushed out of the non-working side of the cylinder and returned back to the tank. In neutral, the pump output just goes through the valve and back to the return line, without building any significant pressure anywhere in the system...

    The stuff I've seen said that the only pressure involved is just from the flow resistance of the lines, and the restriction imposed by the filter itself, so the pressure involved should be less than what your automobile oil filter sees... If the pressure goes up, it means the filter is clogged and needs replacing. As a further note showing it's low pressure, the factory return line on my splitter is simply a length of 3/4" oil line attached on each end with hose barbs and clamps, very much low pressure stuff....

    That said, I'd agree the filter probably IS specialized, but only in the sense that it's designed to deal with hydraulic fluid rather than other liquids, which might impact the design, choice of filter media, etc, but not particularly high pressure.

    Gooserider
  8. Rich M

    Rich M New Member

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    I'm not going to argue about it but the installation instructions (on the Wix filter itself) require it to be much tighter than a hand tightened filter like on a car. And the box it comes in does say "hydraulic filter" on it.

    I also thought an actual filter part # might be easier and cheaper than your suggestion of replacing the entire filter housing to make some other filter fit.
  9. kevin j

    kevin j Minister of Fire

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    There was a recent thread about this same topic here. NAPA has Wix filters.

    Compared to an engine oil filter, hydraulic filters will deal with more flow, be larger in diameter and in filter media area, usually have no anti drain back valve, and have no bypass valve in the element (it is in the filter head).
    Hydr filters will be finer filtration, usually 10 micron, possibly 25 micron on old machinery. Engine oil filter are typically 25 to 40 micron, although newer ones are moving to finer filtration.
    Seals and materials would likely be similar for petroleum oils.
    Media is usually paper (cellulose) on cheap engine oil filters. Most hydr filters hav emoved to glass fiber, but cheap ones at box stores are probably still paper. glass fiber is more effective on particle removal, and also holds more dirt before going into bypass.

    Most spin on engine or hydr filter are rated to about 200 psi burst although there are spin on charge filter elements with 600 psi burst.

    Any spin on filter on a log splitter should be in the return line, so it should NOT be seeing more than maybe 50-100 psi, just the restriction of the filter element and the return hose. If it is sufficently oversized, 25 psi hot would be typical in a return line.

    kcj
  10. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Not wanting to argue about it either - I thought you might have had info on it that I didn't have... As I said, I figured a hydraulic filter would be specific for that function, just that it wasn't going to be particularly high pressure... And I'm certainly not reccomending replacing the housing, just mentioning it as an alternative option, in case the OP couldn't match it up by bringing in the old filter... Unlike a car the filter housing is seperate so it is a useful option - and the hydraulic shop I occasionally trade at has several on display, so presumably they must sell them.

    Gooserider
  11. Rich M

    Rich M New Member

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    Great follow up, I stand corrected on all counts! Thanks kcj and goose, good info.
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