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Anyone using Dog shock collars?

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by smokinj, Oct 12, 2011.

  1. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Looking at getting one for my dog. She listens most of the time, but she has discovered a pond near by. Once she catches you not looking shes gone and not turning back.

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  2. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    I have an in-ground fence system for my 85lb two-year-old yellow lab. He learned really quickly and no longer has any interest in jail-breaking. I have it around the perimeter of my 3 acre yard.

    This one was a bit pricey compared to some of the others, but it has a lifetime warranty.

    http://www.amazon.com/SportDOG-In-G...TSYU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1318438539&sr=8-3

    If you get one, do yourself a favor and rent the mini-trencher that lays the cable. It was 30 bucks and worth every penny. Had the whole job done in a few hours.
  3. davmor

    davmor Member

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    I use a Dogtra on my Lab. The paging or vibrate feature works well. When she gets head strong she gets a nick. I find that if she has the collar on she does listen to my voice commands more.
  4. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Sweet, normally its not an issue at all. Now she knows that pond and ducks are there its a whole new game. Cant wait to Zap her! :lol:
  5. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    My neighbor has that set up on 4 acres with 3 big dogs. I think if I could zap her on a dead run she will be back to normal quick.....
  6. ISeeDeadBTUs

    ISeeDeadBTUs Guest

    I'm thinkin the Native American Princess is only going to take that one time . . . next thing ya know yer gonna wake up with that think strapped to your ba||s!!

    'Cause no way were you thinking about shocking your canine . . . that's just rude to your best friend. Don't you think he'd like to shock (bite, scratch, poop on) you sometimes for some of the stupid things you do to him?!? :wow:
  7. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    She's Tough and was warned many times....Now its my turn! ;-P
  8. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    I have the Petsafe radio fence - no underground wires. I put 2 transmitters in - one in each end of the house - so their range overlaps inside the house and she has a pretty good run outside. She has about 75 feet infront of the house [10 feet short of the road] and about 85 feet behind the house with plenty of room to roam around the sides of course. She was trained the boundary only once and was shocked only once during the initial training session. Has not been any issues since. she is a good mutt with a healthy space to roam.
  9. kettensäge

    kettensäge Feeling the Heat

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    We had one and quit using it pretty quick. It didn't make consistant contact with the dogs neck, so we would have to turn up the juice to have equal effect. Then when it would work the dog would jump off the ground. Took it off and threw it away.

    I have seen big dogs run right past the buried fences as well, I have never used one.

    What kind of dog? A hunting breed?
  10. Bocefus78

    Bocefus78 Minister of Fire

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    The invisible fences shock them on their way back in the yard too (at least from my experience). My dog would sit in the damn street and look at you wanting to come back. You had to physically remove the collar and drag her a$$ back. What a PIA. I just let her bite tires after a while.....she always came back.
  11. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    A guy I work with has a shock collar on his lab. He says it adjusts the attitude real quick...just have to make sure they know they are doing something wrong when you issue the shock.
  12. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    lol, My neighbor just reinstall his this week for the 3rd time. He had the pros's do it this time. He keeps offering to help but I aerate the lawn spring and fall so not a good match for me.
  13. snowleopard

    snowleopard Minister of Fire

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    If Jay were a dog, he'd be a black lab. I'm betting that she's something along those lines.

    On the other hand, if Dennis was a dog, he'd be a hound. Gamma would be a Standard Poodle. BrotherBart would be a Jack Russell Terrier. Jake would be a Schipperke. ISeeDeadBTU's would be one of those dogs that refuse to make eye contact with you, then sneak up behind and bites. Bad dog. BiggRedd would be a pit bull. And so on.
  14. kettensäge

    kettensäge Feeling the Heat

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    Sounds like the start of a good ash can thread.
  15. smoke show

    smoke show Guest

    Invisable fences and shock collars are effective if the animal is trained properly.

    Work even better on submissive dogs.

    It can be hard to train a dog set in its ways.

    Better to start young.
  16. GAMMA RAY

    GAMMA RAY Minister of Fire

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    A freakin poodle? :shut: I beg to differ.....I would be the Jack Russell..... :)


    My cousin who just gave birth has been using those shock collars on her two long legged boxers with good results. I guess there was some concern about the dogs with the new baby, among other things, I think they tried that electric fence thing too. The female dog is a real boldie! So far so good.
    I got a bird that chomps on my ear, fingers, feet....anything he can get in his beak.....wonder if they make them that small? :smirk: Only kiddin....I tell him "NO dammit!!!" but he just imitates my laugh....bugger.
    I guess there are a lot of mixed feelings about the shock collar thang. If it was up to Mr Gamma, my bird would be equipped with a shock vest.... :lol: he hates him....
  17. snowleopard

    snowleopard Minister of Fire

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    No, not a Freakin' Poodle, a Standard Poodle. Famous for their smiles: http://www.smithpoodles.com/_Standard_Poodles_-_Sires__Dams.html "Among the very smartest and most obedient of dogs, the standard Poodle combines playful exuberance with a zest for life's adventures. He retains his hunting heritage and loves to run, swim and retrieve. He gets along well with everyone, although he can be somewhat reserved with strangers. He is excellent with children." (The last sentence is no reflection on the maturity level of the other posters on h.c.)


    "My cousin who just gave birth has been using those shock collars on her two long legged boxers with good results" is an interesting sentence, that. All kinds of options for interpretation.

    Ash can? Perhaps. They took my New Thread button away and won't give it back.
  18. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Bart would be more appropriately a fine mutt, American born and bred.

    FWIW, the best dog we ever had was a 115# sheppoolab. Dad was a labradoodle and mom was a big German Shepard. In spite of being a big, intimidating dog looking like a chesty wolfhound, he always listened.

    Attached Files:

  19. Fifelaker

    Fifelaker Feeling the Heat

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    I have both Sportdog and dogtra collars.Sportdog has some great tips on there web site and a very good video. The even work on this guy :)

    Attached Files:

  20. basswidow

    basswidow Minister of Fire

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    I have a chocolate lab and we have the invisible fence. The previous homeowner had the buried fence installed - so we just needed the controls and collar. My dog learned the boundry within minutes. It doesn't take them long to figure it out. Mine gives a warning beep when they get too close and shock when they proceed. You can adjust the sensitivity. Works in all kinds of weather and in the deep snow. If the collar battery dies or there is a power failure, she still respects the boundry because she has learned it. We have deer, ground hogs, neighbors walking their dogs, and she will only go as far as the boundry. They give you the marker flags, but the dogs don't need them. They know when they are near the shock point.

    It's so nice to open the door and allow her that freedom. She loves the fence too. She has a good 2 + acres to roam and run. I will always have an invisible fence if I have a dog. It's the only way to go. Great invention and my dog is no worse for it.

    It's an easy do it yourself deal too. The line doesn't go deep.

    Get a good system. I think my box is Petstop. It's collar battery's last long. I don't have much faith in the wireless ones.
  21. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    That why I was looking for the remote. There is hundreds of acres out her to walk, this will allow me to take her....I hope. Monster corn fields and sod farm.
  22. snowleopard

    snowleopard Minister of Fire

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    Now that you mention it, I see the resemblance. Very well: Bart would be a shepoolab.
  23. yooperdave

    yooperdave Minister of Fire

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    jay- i'm thinking that if 99 had a shock collar around here, it would be on my neck to keep me off this site!!!

    however, the neighbor 3 doors down had them on his dogs for awhile and ended up going with the underground fence that seems to work ideal for keeping his dogs in the yard....but not for stopping the barking. although, they don't seem to bark all that much.....
  24. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    lol I am sure I would to! :cheese:
  25. SlyFerret

    SlyFerret Minister of Fire

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    Like a few others here, I have an in ground fence around our 5 acre lot. 5 acres of grass makes a nice playground for our lab-chessie mix and our lab-beagle mix. The invisible fence systems these days are digital, which helps with interference. The collars can also be adjusted for shot intensity and pulse rate in order to customize the collar's correction to each specific dog. I assume the remote collars are similar.

    With the invisible fence, training is extremely important. You can't just turn them loose and let them learn where the boundaries are. You have to invest the time to work with the dogs and train them, and the key to dog training is always consistency. My experience with shock collars as part of the invisible fence system is that they work VERY well if use the tool properly.

    I have a friend who used a remote shock collar on his rot-lab mix. Unfortunately, he didn't take the time to properly train the dog, and wasn't consistent enough. The result, unfortunately is that his poor dog is nervous, paranoid, skittish, and awkward. It's almost like the dog has no idea how to act at any time. He's a very friendly dog, and listens pretty well, but I feel like my friend adversely affected his dogs personality quite a bit by the way the collar was used.

    When trying to decide whether or not to use a remote shock collar as a training tool, don't just consider how the dog will respond to the correction, but think about how you will use it. Make sure that you honestly feel that you will have the discipline to be absolutely consistent in its use. If you think that you might use it out of frustration, or on impulse, take that into consideration. Not only will that reduce the tool's effectiveness, it may also cause unintended changes in your dogs personality.

    -SF

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