1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Anything special you need for a chainsaw boot?

Post in 'The Gear' started by Gooserider, Dec 29, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    I'm slowly accumulating PPE to use when cutting wood for the stove, this will include dropping an occasional tree, but mostly I'll be cutting scrounged stuff on the ground or purchased log-length.

    I just got a pair of Stihl chain-saw chaps, and figure the next thing on my list ought to be a good pair of boots. These would be primarily for use in wood cutting, and I'm wanting to maximize safety as much as I can without compromising comfort and general wearability. (I don't like "safety gear" that makes one clumsy or less able to see, etc...)

    The package for my chaps was talking about Stihl brand "Chain saw boots", and I was wondering what they put into a boot for chain saw use other than just a steel toe, and possibly some arch support and footbed reinforcement.

    IOW, what safety features should I look for in a boot for chainsaw use?

    Gooserider

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,859
    Loc:
    Eastern Nebraska
    Matterhorn 10" Waterproof S&R Chainsaw Boots - Safety Toe - Mens

    Waterproof/Breathable GORE-TEX® Bootie
    Water-Resistant, Breathable Full Grain Leather
    Seven Layers of Kevlar® Insulating Lining for Cut-Resistant Saw Jamming
    Goodyear Welt Construction reduces ankle twists and foot fatigue
    Leather Comfort Collar
    Cambrelle® Breathable Moisture Wicking Lining
    "Scuffy High Abrasion Tip"
    Shock Absorbing Midsole
    Para Shank
    Steel Toe
    Steel Toe meets all current ANSI Standards
    Vibram® Kletterlift Outsole
    Union Made in the U.S.A.
    Weight: 3 lbs.

    http://www.shoestoboot.com/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=429

    *************************************************************************

    I use:
    Matterhorn 10" Waterproof Search Rescue Boots - Safety Toe - Mens

    Waterproof/Breathable GORE-TEX® Bootie
    Water-Resistant, Breathable Full Grain Leather
    Kevlar® Insulated Lining
    Leather Comfort Collar
    Cambrelle® Breathable Moisture Wicking Lining
    Patented Matterhorn "Tiger Tip"
    Shock Absorbing Midsole
    Steel Toe
    Para Shank
    Stainless Steel Bottom Plate
    Flexible Armadillo Internal Metatarsal Guard™, Steel Toe and Stainless Steel Bottom Plate meet all current ANSI Standards
    Vibram® Kletterlift Outsole
    Union Made in the U.S.A.
    Weight: Mens 2.13 lbs., Womens 2.8 lbs.

    http://www.shoestoboot.com/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=428&Category=162
  3. ourhouse

    ourhouse Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2006
    Messages:
    726
    Loc:
    Norfolk Ma
    That pretty wel covers it
  4. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Damn I knew I have to stop wearing flip flops
    Jimmy Buffet Cheese burger in paridise or was that Margravitaville

    Steel toes confortable boot decent soles for grip and traction
  5. suematteva

    suematteva New Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2006
    Messages:
    605
    Loc:
    Rutland, VT//Southern Quebec
  6. MALogger

    MALogger New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    147
    Loc:
    Foxboro, MA
    I have a pair of the labonville chainsaw boot. They are comfortable and reasonably priced. I think I paid around $160 for them.
    They have kevlar and steel toes. I would recommend them. I have a new pair of boots for when I am working in the woods, Swedepro chainsaw boots with caulked soles. Very nice boots and they are available without the caulked soles for similar money as the labonville boots but I haven't had them long enough to determine their longevity. They were field tested by Soren Erickson for years so I am sure they are durable.

    Craig
  7. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    So it sounds like basically it's the Kevlar that makes the difference. The question in my mind is how much difference it really makes over just a plain steel toe. :question:

    I agree that quality boots are a good investment for folks that spend lots of time in them, but given that I will only be cutting for a few hours a year (say about 6 cords worth of rounds)I'm not sure I can justify the cost of $250 or even $160 boots as opposed to the $50 Wally-World specials. Even my riding boots are $100 Rocky's, and they are some of the fanciest boots I've ever bought.

    Yes, if the Kevlar stops me from lopping my foot off, it more than pays for itself, but that standard leads to full body armor inside a padded cell - there is a need for a trade off between the ultimate in protection and the cost for it. Steel toes seem to give a significant level of protection over non-steel toes, at little or no cost over a non-steel toe boot.

    The steel toes are part of the chainsaw boot package, so the big difference is how much ADDED protection does the Kevlar give? I'm not in the habbit of trying to chainsaw my feet anyway, but if I did, presumably the steel toe would stop some percentage of injuries. Also there will be some percentage that the steel toes and the Kevlar, and any other armor wouldn't stop. So what is the percent difference between what the steel stops and what the steel plus Kevlar stops?

    I noticed that EH says he does NOT wear the chainsaw model Matterhorn boots - Why? According to the Stihl packaging, OSHA says anyone getting paid to swing a chainsaw is supposed to wear protective boots (and chaps, and jacket, and head/eye/ear protection, etc) Is the steel toe all that OSHA requires? Or is EH pushing the rules a bit? (Not that hard, the S&R Matterhorn looks like a pretty substantial boot anyway)

    Right now I've been wearing a pair of Dunham "Boots" (a New Balance brand) that are fairly substantial sneaker weight over the ankle leather boots with non-steel toes. They are comfortable, and still have plenty of wear left in them, but I've decided that I really ought to get something more substantial. I'm willing to spend what I have to, but budget is a significant factor so I want to make a wise selection that is fiscally prudent....

    Gooserider



    Gooserider
  8. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,859
    Loc:
    Eastern Nebraska
    I wear the Matterhorn 10” Waterproof Search Rescue Boots - Safety Toe - because
    #1 they are the most comfortable boots i have ever owned/used / put on my foot

    #2 Steel Toe - Meets all current ANSI standards, Class 75.

    #3 Patented Tiger Tip® - Our patented high-abrasion boot tip - a Matterhorn® innovation - provides superior protection and extends the life of the boot.

    #4 GORE-TEX® BEST DEFENSE - Military and tactical footwear offers durably waterproof and breathable all-weather protection with performance unmatched by any other waterproof, breathable military or tactical footwear. GORE-TEX® BEST DEFENSE footwear incorporates a durably waterproof, breathable GORE-TEX® bootie.

    #5 Cambrelle® - The most abrasion-resistant fabric lining. It offers excellent moisture wicking capabilities with its rapid moisture release technology. The result is superior warmth and comfort.

    #6 Kevlar® - With extraordinary toughness, these rugged fiber products enhance the tenacity,
    thermal stability and cut-resistance of any boot. They combine excellent protection with warm, fast-drying comfort.

    #7 Vibram® Outsoles - Technically designed to enhance performance in a variety of environments. The perfect base for a boot, these outsoles provide durable, efficient and comfortable tread designs. Vibram is recognized as the world leader for high performance in the most rugged footwear.

    #8 Stainless steel bottom shank.

    #9 Flexible Internal Metatarsal Guard - Combined with a steel toe, the internal metatarsal guard provides additional protection against dangerous on-the-job accidents. Meets all current ANSI Requirements for safety toe standards.

    The Metatarsal Guard wraps around the top of the foot and is flex steel protection plate.
    see picture attachment

    Attached Files:

  9. ourhouse

    ourhouse Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2006
    Messages:
    726
    Loc:
    Norfolk Ma
    You could walk up the side of a tree with his new Swedpro boots. The caulks are about a 1/2"to3/4" long. Their a good looking boot.
  10. MALogger

    MALogger New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    147
    Loc:
    Foxboro, MA
    Steel toes do offer some protection if you hit your foot straight on the front of the toe, they are certainly better than nothing or cutting wood in your sneakers! Your question was about chainsaw boots and if they don't meet ansi standards I don't consider them chainsaw boots. If you look at chainsaw injury statistics to the foot the most common place to get cut is on the top of either foot or in the arch of your right foot not on the toe. In those instances a steel toe offers no protection.

    Craig
  11. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    Ahh.. That is some really good information with explanation of why the Kevlar is worth it. (Of course it could be the numbers reflecting the people wearing steel toe boots that don't get cut, but the point is still valid) I think I will definitely look for a chainsaw grade boot, though I may try to find something a bit less pricey. (BTW the Labonvilles are now up to $170 - gov't sponsored inflation emulates a vacuum)

    Gooserider
  12. stangds

    stangds New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Messages:
    34
    take an old pair of steel toe boots, get your chainsaw ripping, and see how far you can saw through the steel part. I'll bet you'll be surprised. I cut halfway through a grade 5 3/8 bolt once before the chain dulled out too bad..... kevlar is needed for full protection. kevlar and common sense :)
  13. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,859
    Loc:
    Eastern Nebraska
  14. sgcsalsero

    sgcsalsero Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    442
    Loc:
    ClevelandRocks
  15. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    5,705
    Loc:
    Central NYS
    The kevlar has to be built into the boots, I believe.

    To expand on what MALogger Craig said, one of the most vulnerable parts of your foot when using a chainsaw is the top of your foot just above your ankle. That's where all the tendons, blood vessels, gristle and other vital supply routes for your foot pass through. Cut through that part of your foot (pretty easy with a chainsaw) and you'll wish you'd spent the extra $50. To put it another way, cut yourself there, and you might as well cut your foot right off.

    I've got the Labonvilles, too.
  16. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    The Labonville add for those liners does claim that they meet the OSHA requirements - same text they have next to the Labonville leather boots. However one thing I did see in the add was that they said you needed to buy a boot one size larger in order to use them. IOW, unless you already have a pair of oversize boots, you're going to end up spending about the same amount of money either way, by the time you buy the liners and a pair of boots that will go with them.

    I did see one other option on the Labonville site that did look interesting however. Thesebushwacker boots don't claim to be using kevlar, but do say they offer OSHA grade protection, and arguably claim more protection than the leather boots, but are MUCH less expensive - The first chainsaw boots I've seen for less than $100. Do you think these boots would be adequate for a part-time non-pro person?

    I've seen the discussion about paying more for extra quality boots, and if I was working in them all the time, I'd agree that spending the extra money is worth it, but I really have trouble justifying spending huge amounts of money on "comfy" boots that I might wear 40 hours a YEAR, as opposed to boots that I'd be wearing every day. For my level of occasional use, I feel that I'm better off getting the lower cost boots as long as they provide about the same level of safety....

    Gooserider
  17. sgcsalsero

    sgcsalsero Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    442
    Loc:
    ClevelandRocks
    I checked with Labonville, they said the liner gets you 4 layers of Kevlar, their boots have 6 layers, looks like I'll be investing in a new set of boots.
  18. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    Well, I decided to splurge... After lots of web searching, I was able to find the Matterhorn `12277' Chainsaw Boots for $231.95 which wasn't that much more than the Labonvilles - the Swedepros were in between...

    For whatever it's worth, the Matterhorns have more kevlar, the gore-tex booties, and come up 2" higher, etc... It was worth noting that the Matterhorns were the only ones that claim to have a UL listing, I decided the arguably greater safety might be worth it, (hopefully I'll never find out...) and spent the extra. Just hope I won't be dissapointed!

    I just ordered them at Central Police Supply Hopefully they will be here fairly soon, though it is a ways from TX to MA - however they do have free shipping.

    Will let folks know what I think when I get them.

    Gooserider
  19. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,737
    Loc:
    Northeastern MA (near Lowell)
    I got the boots a few days ago - shipping was quite timely and within the estimated time. Apparently the store doesn't ship themselves, but instead has them forwarded from the factory. - Considering that in my case the factory is closer, it might even have saved a day or two.

    Packaging was quite nice - plastic shrink over cardboard box, inside each boot was packed in a substantial plastic bag. There was TONS of documentation - I think every outfit that made a part which went into the boot had their own hang tag, not to mention the "will not protect against all injury" disclaimer tags, and Matterhorn's own puff peices - even a mail order add for where to send the boots in a few years when they need resoling!

    When I put the boots on, I found them quite comfortable - A bit loose, I suspect they expect people to be wearing heavy socks, and size accordingly, but not objectionably so. I've worn them around the house and doing non-stress out door stuff - (shopping and such) a couple of days, and they are reasonably comfortable. A bit stiff, but they flex nicely when you walk in them, even if you can hardly move your foot when wiggling it around.

    The other problem I had was that I kept kicking things by accident - never felt a thing, but I'd hear the 'klunk' - must have something to do with my feet suddenly being that much bigger - it appears the steel toe is a bit oversized, which makes the boot more comfy, but also clumsier. Just need to get used to it.

    The only place that was at all uncomfortable was actually not in the foot, but in the shaft going up my legs. The fully gusseted tongue didn't want to wrap neatly into the boot around my leg as I was lacing it up, I suspect because of the kevlar padding, and thus was a bit lumpy feeling. I also had a hard time getting the tension on the laces even. This wasn't a big issue though.

    I do wish the speed lace hooks came all the way to the top of the boot, it is a nusiance threading the top two tiers of regular eyes every time - my shorter Dunham boots with speed lacers all the way up are easier to deal with. In addition, the round cord laces the boots come with tear the heck out of my fingers, though this will probably get better as they get broken in (and I get callouses)

    I haven't tried doing any serious work in them yet, but I think they'll be fine. Gods willing I'll never actually get to find out how good the kevlar protetction actually works! This is the trouble with this sort of PPE - you don't really want to know just how good it is! :lol:

    Gooserider
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page