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Atlanta Stove Company Model 20

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by scarps23, Jul 25, 2011.

  1. scarps23

    scarps23 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2011
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    NE Iowa
    I've done some researching on this stove and figured out that it was bought by B'ham stove and range many years ago. Hopefully this is in the correct forum and hasn't been talked about already. New to the site. I'm trying to find the specs for the stove due to insurance. Anyone know where or how I could get ahold of them?

    Any other advice on how to get around insurance "fire marshall" specifications? They said that if the stove's specifications were less than fire marshall's they would accept that. It is currently installed in the corner of a room with brick. I've included a picture. Does anyone know of any wall material that might have been used inside the brick to allow a closer proximity to the brick.

    Thanks in advance for any help!

    Attached Files:

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,247
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    I would be suspect about that installation!
    It looks like the legs have been removed, and if so, that flunks big time.

    I seriously doubt anything inside the brick could have or would have reduced the clearances.

    At a minimum, you should use the NFPA generic wood stove clearances and also make sure the stove has legs. You can probably find some replacement legs at a stove parts place like Woodsmans, etc.
  3. scarps23

    scarps23 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2011
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    NE Iowa
    This wood stove isn't used for heating throughout the winter. Just a few fires here and there during the colder months. Should this be a concern?
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    45,817
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    Safety is always a concern, even with occasional use. What if the power is out for a week? Will it be depended on then?
  5. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Standards are not based on amount of use. An illegal and unsafe installations is purely that. It only takes once to burn down a place. I myself, in my younger days, burned down a shed and ignited a floor by unsafe installations.

    Basically, it should not be used at all until it can be rendered or proven safe.

    FYI, I also inspected a house recently for an insurance company - a million dollar house which had the major fire. They also had a fireplace they hardly ever used. Well, one day the power went out and they fired it up nice and hot...and the weaknesses (not built to code) came out....it ignited the wood in the walls.
  6. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Loc:
    Bend, OR
    Looks unsafe to me in a number of respects. Most particularly the brick appears to be applied diredtly to the (presumably) combustible wall behind, the stove seems too close to the brick, even if it were built as an approved wall shield, with a 1" airspace. The floor protection in front of the hearth looks questionable. I don't know anything about the stove...if it's s'posed to be supported up on legs, then that's a non-starter. I wouldn't ever burn in that stove. I'd scrap that stove. If I wanted a woodburner in my home, I'd start with a clean slate...even if that meant a lot of nasty rip-out...and make sure it all got done correctly and safely. Proper installation of a solid fuel-burning appliance is nothing to cut corners on. They can be wonderful heaters, and they can be brutally unforgiving if not put in just right. Rick
  7. Wood Heat Stoves

    Wood Heat Stoves Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Loc:
    Nevada City, California
    That looks like an old Franklin design with the legs off. It is probably an unlisted stove and therefore would have no tag on the back with clearances so you would have to go by NFPA 211 for solid fuel appliances, which will usually satisfy the local inspectors.

    http://woodheatstoves.com/free/NFPA211.pdf

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