1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Attaching the stove pipe to a Fisher stove

Post in 'Fisher Stove Information, Parts, History and More' started by Snowslider, Sep 26, 2011.

  1. Snowslider

    Snowslider New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Western Wa
    Greetings to all from a new member.

    I have a Fisher wood stove with an exhaust ring of 1/4" thick steel welded to the top. It has no pre-drilled holes in it for screws to attach the pipe.

    So my question is how best to do the attachment, as it's going to be difficult to drill holes. I can manage it if necessary but curious if there's an alternate method that will make for a safe and chimney-fire-proof attachment? Will just cementing it be adequate? It's difficult to believe the manufacturer intended an installer to drill these holes given the thickness of the steel.

    The stove will be used daily.

    --Doug

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Messages:
    1,620
    Loc:
    NE PA
    Welcome to the forum Doug;
    You didn't mention if the pipe comes out of the top of the stove, side, or rear. If it's a 6 inch out the top, Dura Vent still makes the short adapter with a damper in it that will sit right on top of the stove, fitting inside the collar. Sideways, you should drill 1/8" holes through it to secure the elbow or pipe. Use oil on the drill bit, and take your time. They drill fairly easily. Sheet metal screws start in and many times will twist off before threading the hole in the thicker collar. A self tapping machine screw is better if you don't have taps to thread it. If the pipe won't fit into the collar, you may have to over-crimp the pipe to get it in.
    I personally drill 2 holes on the sides, then put a piece of pipe strap around the elbow if it's an adjustable multi-piece type. One screw in the back of the elbow keeps the strap in place. That way if the elbow ever comes apart, it is at least held together. If you can use a 90* solid elbow, go with that instead with just screws.

    Attached Files:

  3. Snowslider

    Snowslider New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    Western Wa
    It's an 8" out the top.
    --Doug
  4. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Messages:
    1,620
    Loc:
    NE PA
    Duh, I see "welded to the top" in your question; sorry about that. Crimped end down, damper in pipe, best with 3 screws if you feel safer with earthquakes and what not going on. If you have straight up sections going to a ceiling support box, there is plenty of weight holding it down, and it's not going anywhere. Most codes call for 3 screws at each joint.

Share This Page