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Average life of circulating pump??

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by reaperman, Feb 7, 2008.

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  1. reaperman

    reaperman Member

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    Just curious of how many years of use some of you guys are getting on your circulating pumps. I am asking because I have two circulators running a: "be nice to me", off peak ELECTRIC, boiler
    in floor heat system, for my wifes boarding kennel. I have two Taco 007's, that have been in use for about five years now. The pumps dont run continusely, only when the boiler is running. I dont have a replacement on hand, but I think its time to get one, just in case.

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  2. Jersey Bill

    Jersey Bill Member

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    the answer is, it depends.
    bad water and high temperatures are the key factors that will kill a pump.

    In my house, 8 years ago I started with all 'red' pumps, like 12 of them. I was replacing the high temp ones after a year or 2. I bought the rebuild kits to try that, but after a rebuild, they lasted about half as long.
    During this process, I added a water softener for the makeup water which helped.
    Then I started replacing them with Taco pumps and its been much better. So far I only had 1 taco pump fail on me and it was from before the renovation. I also just added magnets for water conditioning http://gmxinternational.com/products/gmx800.htm

    Look on EBAY for a deal on a spare 007

    good luck!

    oh, did you know that your weather station is showing 225 MPH wind gusts. Do you live in a windy area?
  3. mtfallsmikey

    mtfallsmikey New Member

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    I believe you will get 5 or more years additional out of the Taco's, if, as Bill says, and I agree, that you take good care of your water, Also, do you have a Y-strainer anywhere in the lines? I'm going to put one on my primary loop, in the supply, just to take care of any trash before it hits the circ.
  4. BrownianHeatingTech

    BrownianHeatingTech Minister of Fire

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    Installation orientation is important, too. Except in certain specific (high-pressure) applications, circulator pumps of this sort must be installed with the motor shaft horizontal. A large percentage of premature failures are the direct result of improper installation.

    Joe
  5. Bob Rohr

    Bob Rohr Minister of Fire

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    I'm a big fan of hydronic conditioners. Doesn't take much, usually 1 gallon will treat most systems. I like the Rhomar 922 www.rhomarwater.com

    It has an O2 scavenger, ph buffer, locks up hardness and provides a thin film coating to prevent corrosion.

    It is also a multi metal product for use with copper, steel, aluminum, stainless, etc.

    If nothing else start with a good clean system. Buy and use a hydronic system cleaner, or TSP. Flush and use good fill water.

    Expect 10 years or more from a good brand circ.

    I like Grundos circs. they have a small device that vibrates (electronically) to assure a fall start up after the circ sits idle all summer. Most circs fail when they can't start due to sludge, deposits, etc.

    If a circ gets hot to the touch, much hotter then the fluid passing through it, the rotor is stuck. Open it up and get it spinning and they can usually be saved. Eventually they will get hot enough to boil in the volute and pump housing.

    hr
  6. reaperman

    reaperman Member

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    Well, the system was installed by a heating professional. It's a closed loop system. The same water that initally filled the system years ago is the same water in there today. I asked him if I should change the water on a yearly basis. Because I figured water gets "scummy" with age. He claims water only gets scummy when mixed with air. So the water in the original system is "air tight", therefore can be left there indefinately. I accepted his logic and have left it alone. My water comes from my private well, and is clean for a well. I believe the hardness is 10.

    One reason I'm asking about the life of a pump is we have had some cold spells lately. So instead of only having the pump(s), running when the boiler kicks in. I wired one of the pumps to run continusely to take extra precaution when the temps hit -20 or colder. I noticed in doing this that the pump running 24/7 is somewhat hot. Not burning to the touch hot, like when the boiler is running, but hot enough where you dont want to hold on to it either. Despite the water temp being circulated is as low as 60F. But again I'd think anything running for a week should be somewhat hot.

    I know with the Taco, the cartridge is replaceable. Does this cartridge replace everything needed when a pump poops out? So I should just have a spare cartridge on hand or is it better to have a complete unit for a spare.
  7. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I think you can get a new pump on Ebay cheaper than you can get a replacement cartridge. I believe the cartridges are for situations where you forgot to put isolation valves in around the flanges, and don't want to drain the system to replace the pump. Cheaper in that case to pay more for a replacement cartridge than a brand new pump.
  8. leaddog

    leaddog Minister of Fire

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    If you pull the cartridge with out an isolation valve you will get WET.
    leaddog
  9. Bob Rohr

    Bob Rohr Minister of Fire

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    I'd agree with your pro, leave to water in the system it should be fine.

    Be sure you are not dead heading the pump, an old Jerry Garcia term :) In other words IF it has zone valves one needs to be open if you wire the pump to run continuously. Or a pressure bypass valve installed.

    Really the pump should not be much warmer than the fluid going through it with a wet rotor circulator. Unless it is running way off it's curve, against a closed down system. That, for sure, will be a factor in it's life expectancy.

    hr
  10. Nofossil

    Nofossil Moderator Emeritus

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    The Taco 007 that I installed with my original oil boiler in 1987 is still in use. I've never had a pump fail on me. I've had two zone valves fail - 1 gear train and 1 limit switch. Both repairable without removing the valve.
  11. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Then I guess I don't understand why a new pump is cheaper than a replacement cartridge. I think even at retail list price, there's not that much difference. Just a gimmick?

    I've had good luck with Grundfos. Taco too, for that matter, though I did have one old 007 just quit moving water. It ran (you cold hear the motor running) and it ran quiet, just didn't move any water. I guess the impeller was somehow compromised, though I never did take it apart to find out.
  12. reaperman

    reaperman Member

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    Here is what my boiler looks like. I have been wiring the green pump on the bottom to run constantly. This is the pump that mainly circulates the water through the weirsbo and back. The bronze pump ( I know, I got a deal on it for $50 brand new. Thats why is a bronze) Is the pump that circulates the boiler loop. Am I putting added stress on the green pump in only wiring that one to run constantly when the boiler is not running? Or should I wire both pumps run continous during off heating cycles? I did the best I could with the pictures. Its kind of hard to get the entire unit on film in a smallish room.

    Attached Files:

  13. pdboilermaker

    pdboilermaker New Member

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    My Taco 011 lasted 2.5 years then stopped, I went out took it off, broke it down, spun the cartridge by hand dry a few revolutions, put it back on plugged it back in.

    It growled for a couple of minutes and has been working trouble free for 1/2 a year now.
  14. atlarge54

    atlarge54 New Member

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    These pumps are really low on torque and easy for impeller to get stuck. This fall I moved a 009 from my main boiler loop to my floor manifold and it wouldn't restart. I took it off and used a screwdriver to spin the impeller and it took right off. Reinstalled and it's been fine ever since, no growling on startup either. Before you give up on a pump it's a good idea to give it a little bench testing. I'd guess a lot of good pumps have been thrown away because of a minor jam.
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