1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Averaging out moisture content

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by SaratogaJJ, Jan 30, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. SaratogaJJ

    SaratogaJJ New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    53
    Loc:
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    As I've been going through my first winter as a wood burner, I started out burning almost exclusively the two tons of Envi-Blocks that I had bought over the summer.

    I recently acquired about a 1/2 cord of hardwood, which I would estimate to be semi-seasoned. Definitely not green (most of it does have that hollow 'pop' sound when hit against each other or dropped onto a concrete floor, rather than the dull 'thud' associated with green wood), but it does have a moderate amount of sizzle when burned.

    I am certainly aware of the negatives associated with burning unseasoned wood. However, I was wondering if I were to burn some of this semi-seasoned wood at the same time as two or three 6.5-pound Envi-blocks, the overall moisture content of the load would be driven down, and wouldn't cause any big problems with creosote and whatnot. The Envi-blocks are said to have somewhere between 5% and 8% moisture by weight, so would that offset the somewhat excessive moisture from the regular hardwood?

    Essentially, my Envi-block supply will run out around maybe the first week of March. If, however, I can supplement the supply with some of this cordwood, I think I can stretch it out to maybe the 3rd or 4th week of March, which is pretty much the end of heating season in these parts, at which point I can begin planning for next year!

    Thanks for any ideas/analysis you folks might provide!

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Maybe average the way you are thinking, but it is still sap, which causes creosote. The only thing it needs is time; like wait until next fall before burning it. If the wood sizzles, it is not ready to burn even with something else.
  3. bluefrier

    bluefrier Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2008
    Messages:
    320
    Loc:
    Maryland
    I think it will help to some degree, especially in a non-cat stove.. the lower moisture content compress logs will help
    maintain a hot firebox and support good secondary combustion. I've had good result mixing pallet wood with semi-season
    wood in the past.
  4. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    Messages:
    15,972
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    Just watch your chimmey make sure it doesnt build up cresote now would be a good time to sweep it!
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page