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Baffle Ok for my setup?

Post in 'Fisher Stove Information, Parts, History and More' started by gooney, Oct 4, 2013.

  1. gooney

    gooney New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2013
    Messages:
    9
    Loc:
    Tuftonboro
    Hit there.I have a 1980 papa bear vented out and up my exterior.3 feet of stovepipe,plus the 90 s then two ft supervent horizontal out.
    Chimney height about 19 ft.Do i still want to install a baffle or will this reduce flue temperature to much?
    thanks.

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  2. gooney

    gooney New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2013
    Messages:
    9
    Loc:
    Tuftonboro
    Going up north to hunt for the weekend and probably won't read any posts til monday,but I appreciate any advice.
  3. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Messages:
    1,604
    Loc:
    NE PA
    The chimney, (after 2 feet horizontal Supervent) should be 6 inch insulated all the way up. Dumping into an oversize masonry chimney will require much more heat allowed up.
    By setting the air inlets and outlet pipe damper correctly and using a pipe thermometer, you can keep the flue temperature above 250* and have a much hotter stove. The baffle plate won't create any more creosote as long as you keep the same temperature flue you do now. If you know what flue temperature you're comfortable running now, and you know the stove temp, expect the stove to be twice the flue temp with a baffle installed. If you're close to doing that without a baffle, you're better than most. The added plus is how much less smoke you will see with an angled baffle plate. As long as it prevents smoke particles from entering the chimney, it will reduce creosote even more. You can run too cold, and load it up quick with or without the baffle.
    If this is a top vent stove, you will notice a larger difference in heat retention in the stove than if it's rear or side vented.
  4. gooney

    gooney New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2013
    Messages:
    9
    Loc:
    Tuftonboro
    Thanks for the reply.Its supervent 6" chimney. I've had a few burns since and am beginning to get the feel for it.
    There was a gasket on the door when i got it but i took it off afte rreading your stuff here.The latch needed some persuasion to close right but now it fits tightly
    Purchasing a thermometer today,could you point me toward some helpful posts?.Thanks
  5. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Messages:
    1,604
    Loc:
    NE PA
    Don't know of any posts without using the search feature at top right of page - just under your username and Inbox / Alerts. Click into the Search box and type thermometer, and you get a drop down to fill in search terms.
    I'd start by keeping it around 300 where the flue gasses enter the chimney. Any cresote is going to form up near the top where temp may drop lower than 250*f. As you check it regularly, you'll find how much you're creating and you'll know if you need to increase flue temp.
    If the chimney draws well enough, (unknown factors like topography, trees, roof shape, wind....) you should be able to keep a pipe damper close to the stove outlet partially closed along with the baffle plate and adjust to keep stove top twice the flue temp. That's the object anyway...........

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