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Baking on the Progress Hybrid.

Post in 'The Inglenook' started by rideau, Dec 28, 2013.

  1. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    As many know, I hope to make an oven for the top of my PH. Meanwhile....

    I had a frozen lasagna that needed cooking: 2 hours at 400 degrees were the instructions.

    I didn't feel like using the oven, so I got a rack out of the oven, removed the soapstone pieces from the PH, put the downpointing rungs of the rack in the channel at the back of the stove. The rack sat securely on the stove, front of the rack sticking out a few inches, end pieces pointing up.

    I had the PH at right around 400 degrees. Put a cookie tray on the rack, then the lasagna on the cooking tray, barely cracked the top open at the middle to vent moisture...not nearly as tented as I would have had it in the oven.

    Then just left it there. Kept the stove at around 400. Cooked the lasagna beautifully.....left it on there a lot longer than 2 hours, though.

    Next time I try to bake something on the PH, I'm going to use the rack, but use a large roasting pan as an oven, and put my food in it. I may try a pie or cake or brownies or cookies next time...or a loaf of bread. The orasting pan should be fine up on the rack. I suspect it will work very well.

    Has anyone else tried baking on a rack over the stove?

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  2. flyingcow

    flyingcow Minister of Fire

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    I'm lost, whats a progress hybrid? BTW anything that cooks lasagna sounds ok to me.
  3. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    It's a Woodstock stove, that has a cast iron cooking surface under the soapstone top. The top, which is three sections, lifts back into a grove and exposes three elements. I removed the soapstone entirely and put a grate on top of the stove, then baked on the grate.
    flyingcow likes this.
  4. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    flyingcow likes this.
  5. 1750

    1750 Feeling the Heat

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  6. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef Minister of Fire

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    Some people simply have the best of everything..especially those in southern Ontario ;)
    Nicely done rideau, I envy ya.

    No baking has been done on my woodstove yet. Hell, I don't even have time to do my laundry....lol

    ANdrew
  7. becasunshine

    becasunshine Feeling the Heat

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    I wonder if something like this would work:

    http://www.coleman.com/product/camp-oven/2000009191#.UsFm1qOA3VI

    We have one; we've used it on top of the Coleman stove. It works pretty well.

    I guess that you could do some Dutch oven "baking" on top of a wood stove as well... (I don't yet own a wood stove so I don't know.)
  8. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    Decided to try oakcakes for my Mom, cooked in the large covered roasting pan. Used butter instead of shortening (cause my Mom loves butter). Butter was pretty cold, and after cutting in to the flour mixture, wouldn't form a manageable ball for rolling...didn't want to add too much water, so put the bowl on the hearth in front of the fire for a few minutes to soften the butter. Left the room, and came back to my Wheaten enjoying the nice bowl of dog food I put in front of the fire for him. My bad...I NEVER put food on the floor, except in his bowl. Don't know what I was thinking.

    Anyway, the second batch of oatcakes cooked nicely in the roasting pan. Next time I'll try a yeast dough, or bar cookies.

    I know meats and poutry roast nicely directly on the stovetop in this pan, but on a rack seems to work for baking, so far.
  9. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    A covered roasting pan is a good idea for cooking on the stove top. It provides protection from spillovers and more even temps when covered. A thick cast iron dutch oven also works pretty well. On the T6 we have both slow and quick cooked using a dutch oven, depending on whether the trivets were swung out or not. Use a cake pan underneath to catch spills.

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