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'Baking' splits atop the stove

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by jtcedinburgh, Oct 27, 2006.

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  1. jtcedinburgh

    jtcedinburgh New Member

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    Hi everyone.

    Due to this being my first winter with a wood burner, I have yet to sort out my wood storage. So some of it is under cover in a greenhouse and the remainder is stacked down the side of my home (with a big trug filled with logs for immediate use).

    I've taken to using the drier logs (which have been helped along by occasional 40C+ temperatures in the greenhouse) to start fires, and then adding some of the logs from the side of the house into the fire when reloading on a hot bed of coals.

    My question today is this: will placing logs atop the stove (whilst it's hot) make any real difference to the moisture content? I find that the logs get very warm indeed (almost too hot to hold after a while) and they give off a woody odour as they warm. My theory is that I can reduce the moisture by effectively 'baking' the logs prior to using them. But, am I wasting my time??? If I am, I won't bother, as the odour isn't particularly pleasant (though neither is it unpleasant).

    any thoughts welcomed.

    john

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  2. DriftWood

    DriftWood Minister of Fire

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    YUM YUMMMM. Would that be baked or fried logs??? What size dutch oven or skittle you using?
    I use the top of my stove for real food. I just stack wood around stove a safe distance out on the hearth.
  3. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Had to do an inspection after a wood stove related fire The lady forgot that she left the logs on top of the stove and went out doing erranns When she arrived home she had all kinds
    of visiters and trucks in front of her home Word of caution there
  4. ChrisN

    ChrisN Feeling the Heat

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    Safety issues aside I think it is way inefficient to season wood this way. When It's chilly outside you will need much more fuel to feed the beast than you will be able to dry atop it. My first year of burning I had to scramble to get dry wood and tried these same techniques, it's just a PITA to me. I've come to the conclusion that the only way to efficently employ this stove to heat my house is to get my next season's fuel supply set by early spring and let nature dry it for me. Plus back to the safety aspect, on more than one occasion I managed to let the wood sit too close to the stove too long and got some smoking. Too scary for me.

    Chris
  5. jtcedinburgh

    jtcedinburgh New Member

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    Thanks for the replies. At the moment it still isn't that cold here, so I am able to 'bake' roughly the same amount of logs that I need to use. Of course, seasoning is the answer, and the bulk of my wood is seasoned, but due to the storage situation some of that has become a little damp, so I was hoping that the 'baking' would help.

    Oh, I'm not baking them *too* hot - I've only been doing this with perhaps two or three splits in the stove at a time, and a flue temp of around 300-350F tops. If I wanted to go for a hotter burn I'd probably tip the balance and have to use the splits I am baking, if that makes sense. Plus, I don't particularly want the 'woody odour' as it's a bit musty to my nose.
  6. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    :bug:

    It doesn't help. I had a peice of "unknown" wood I wanted to try burning last year. (turned out to be mulberry). I tried sitting that peice of wood in front of the stove for weeks. (in front of the glass on the hearth is quite hot) Wasn't willing to let it sit on top of the stove....for exactly the reason Elk pointed out, but when I let the house I would put it off to the side on the carpet in the room. After a few weeks it was a bit lighter, but when I finally tried burning it...it sizzled. I just tried burning some of that wood a couple days ago, and it was seasoned just fine. Seems like pretty good wood too.
  7. ChrisN

    ChrisN Feeling the Heat

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    JT, A bit off-topic, but are you anywhere near Faslane? In my previous life I was a submariner in the U.S. Navy and spent lots of time there resting while on North Atlantic deployments. Lovely country, I was lucky to be the persicope operator and it always warmed my heart to see the imposing Ailsa Craig welcoming us to Scotland. Of course being an enthusiastic Sailor, I also spent my fair share of time hunkered down in the pubs of Helensburgh! (And I shudder to think of the nights wasted away in Glasgo :coolsmile: )
  8. jtcedinburgh

    jtcedinburgh New Member

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    No, I'm on t'other side of the country - on the north coastline of the River Forth, roughly 8 miles (as the crow flies) from Edinburgh, but a 45 minute drive (due to having to go over the bridge). West coast is very nice though, and I've enjoyed a good few holidays and trips up that way - it's a bit like Norway in miniature over there!
  9. sstanis

    sstanis New Member

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    have the hearthstone heritage, perform the "baking" method with "almost seasoned" wood and works fine. Only do it when I am home and can flip the pieces. Have had a few give off some smoke, which was not more than a cigarette. Moreover, I think the soapstone gives that soft, warm heat as compared to some of cast stoves. Therefore allowing water evaporation as opposed to possible volatile gas evaporation with a hot stove.
  10. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    :roll:

    O.k fine.....it doesn't help...MUCH...The drastically reduced period of time over which I was looking to "season" or reduce moisture content of a peice of green wood was not effective. Wood drying time can be reduced, but the most effective tool isn't a hot wood stove.

    Better?
  11. hardwood715

    hardwood715 Feeling the Heat

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    Hmmm -clearance to cumbustibles, come to mind, who was it said that split damn near cumbusted sitting right on the hearth?
  12. jldunn

    jldunn New Member

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    I find the best way to dry my wood is to throw it in the fire for a bit.
  13. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Surely you jest? Seems a bit risky way to dry wood. Combustion point being around what 450? But maybe you also want to consider strapping some splits onto the car's manifold to dry while out on errands? :eek:hh:

    Just keeping the wood in a heated indoor spot is about the best thing to do, the greenhouse is a great idea if it vents the moisture. Maybe have a fan on low blowing across it. Split it into smaller splits to accelerate drying.
  14. DonCT

    DonCT Minister of Fire

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    I think BG has got something there!!! Just strap the wood to your vehicle. That way you get sun and 65 mph drying :) It would be like a modern version of the "Woodie"

    You just may get some wierd looks.
  15. hardwood715

    hardwood715 Feeling the Heat

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  16. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

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    I've done it on top of my wood furnace to help remove some surface moisture and warm up the wood before tossing it into the furnace. The thing with mine is, the temps are very low, probably under 100 degrees on the jacket, So I dont worry about combustion. Now if it was a wood stove, I wouldnt even consider it. Too many things can go wrong. Ive been through 3 house fires, which none were from wood burning. And I will say its not a great experience and I wish it on no one.
  17. ourhouse

    ourhouse Minister of Fire

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    Doesn't sound like a great idea. I think its a house fire waiting to happen.
  18. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    I think a lot of people need to work on there wood pile supply a lot earlier in the year or even best ........the year before. ;-)
  19. colsmith

    colsmith New Member

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    I also spread the dampest wood around my hearth to take the outer sogginess away more quickly. It won't get more than 130 degrees at any distance from the stove, we have taken temperatures all over the place to check it out. I DO NOT put wood on top of the stove. I must admit I tried that in March, but it got too hot and made me nervous, no smoke or anything. In my case it isn't the age/seasoning of the wood that gets my wood damp, it relates to precipitation. All the wood we have to burn this season is indeed from last year, we started collecting wood well before we got our stove. But trying to just cover the top with tarps so that the moisture can escape on the sides doesn't help totally when it rains every other day for 2 months straight. Well okay it isn't every other day, it is more like 5 days in a row and then a couple days off, and then it rains some more. A really wet late summer/fall here in SE Wisconsin. In the buckets and things out in my yard, the rain can be measured in feet more easily than inches. We have too many wood piles and the rain does not follow the weather predictions, so it isn't possible in real life to spread the tarps out more fully when it will rain and then move them when it isn't raining. Just rains too much. So wood on the edges and ends get wet quite often from the rain because wind is involved. And I can't cover it up too much or it rots under the tarps. I wish there was some way to send the extra rain to a drought stricken region.
  20. hardwood715

    hardwood715 Feeling the Heat

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    See post, storm is brewin'

    Same here, I think thats where the wood came from in prior post- reloading with duds, Warren says it wasn't dry yet, I want to blame the wind driven rain, my wood pile is like a fenceline, covered on top with tarps, plastic . and the fact that I stack wrong, all in one direction, so ends catch all the weather, while air can't circulate ( Thanks Warren for the tip and view of your piles!)
    Warrens stack's are some of the driest, lightest wood I ever saw and covered on top with plastic, and also under trees, but dry as a died in the dessert bone, his stacking technique is admirable!
  21. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Thanks Steve...It may work well, but I certainly didn't invent it. I'm pretty sure I listened to guys like BeGreen, Eric, Craig, Elk etc...

    Actually last year, the place where that stack is sitting must have fallen over 5 times....It was Eric's suggestion on stacking technique that kept that beast standing. I do like the criscross method of stacking on pallets though, with the more random shape peices in the middle I'll have to see how dry those are as we dig into that pile. Looks like today is a bust for grabbing more wood though... 2o bucks says Kevin doesn't stop by with the Neon to grab splits today... :)
  22. hardwood715

    hardwood715 Feeling the Heat

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    Bummer weather Warren, BTW the pine burns real well with the maple mix! Rest assured that load is in the shed STAYING dry! Monday Back to workday seems like the drier day to come! EXCEPT its gonna get dark earlier after tonights wind back, why don't they wait till AFTER Halloween to do that seems it would give the little ones an extra hour of twilight!
  23. Dave_1

    Dave_1 New Member

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    Since it is almost that time of year.

    As sung to the tune; “Chestnuts roasting on an open fire

    White oak roasting on your Fisher Bear,
    While the wife wrings her hands in despair,
    For as smoke floats gently thru the air,
    The alarms are going off everywhere

    Elk scrambling upon your roof top to see,
    That your emissions are below 0’ point 3
    While tiny tots with their eyes all aglow
    Wonder how he holds on up ther in the snow

    They know he’s not Santa as they can plainly see
    That he’s dressed like Inspector Clouseau on tv
    And they know their mother is going to cry
    If he requires 36” of clearance for the Fisher to fly

    But he knows about the turkey & mistletoe
    Helps to make his job a lil easier you know
    A free meal, why that just can't be beat
    Especially when there are the extra treats

    And so I offer this simple song
    For all you that roast your firewood upon
    Although its been said many times in many ways
    Get a pre-EPA Fisher because they really pay

    Now pass the turkey, please.
  24. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Hahahah.......... Very nice.
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