Basement flooring

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by velvetfoot, Sep 25, 2011.

  1. jebatty

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    The planks could be removed by removing the screws.
     
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  2. gpcollen1

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    If it is what I am thinking, those are Trim head Screws - like what you use for screwing and plugging hardwood.

    As for the flooring options presented in my case:

    My basement is only 1/2 basement with half height concrete [poured] wall. The temperature is an issue, of course, but it is really the clash of temperatures and moisture generation that i am looking to negate.

    In the winter, I heat that concrete up for sure with the wood stove [carpet on slab] and it stays nice and dry in there.

    In the spring and fall, a bit of dehumidifcation is necessary and it generates a bit of heat which is welcome.

    In the summer, the warmer and humid air really stank that place up. I use a portable AC unit and sometimes the dehumidifier at night just to pull some more water. I have central air in the house but it does not go down to that level - I DON'T use Central Air that much anyway really.

    So the plan is to reinsulate the entire room, including the floor, and reframe. Walls will be redone or furred out to get 2x6 walls, minimum. I have enough height to add at least 4 inches to my floor.

    NO WAY am I flooring right on top of XPS.
     
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  3. semipro

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    I'm curious, why: fire concern or other?
     
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  4. gpcollen1

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    No reason to not have a really solid floor moving forward. Not looking to do it half-assed. As long as you have the height, which I do, the best way to do it is to build a floor, not float plywood or something on XPS. I am only doing this once and the floor will be able to handle tile or hardwood or anything else I put down. I understand if someone just wants to float a floor on the XPS but it is not for me...

    http://www.buildingscience.com/documents/reports/rr-0309-renovating-your-basment

    http://www.buildingscience.com/documents/reports/rr-0202-basement-insulation-systems
     
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  5. michaelreinard

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    I plan on doing tile and laminate. It makes sense to seal the laminate section, but what about under the tile. I don't think you typically seal a floor before tiling, but maybe I'm wrong about that.
     
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  6. velvetfoot

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    I saw this interlocking garage tile at Lowes yesterday. I like it a lot. Seems to be easily removable. Good for exercise room. Moisture/mold resistant. Not sure how insulating they are, but they could take the edge off. Maybe put something (not sure what) underneath. $2.23/ft2.
    http://tinyurl.com/6k6kera

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. kenfsr

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    Here is a website for products i have used as a contractor, you can simulate stone , tile or granite . I have used this on basement floors, front steps and walkways, walls, counter tops.The product is easy to use, it is similar to applying paint, but is made out of stone in an acrylic base. very durable, you can use their stock colors or make your own designs and colors.

    http://www.daichcorp.com/

    I also attached a picture of the job i did on my own walls surrounding our pellet stove insert.
     

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  8. velvetfoot

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    Very interesting!!!
    The basement floors are holding up?
     
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  9. kenfsr

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    Yes, this is an exterior/interior coating, they have a waterproofing membrane coating that can be used also underneath this material. Info is there on their website. There are different coatings for different applications. Also different clear top coats for how you want it to look and perform, High gloss, satin. flat etc. Browese their website , I think you might find this a viable way to accomplish your project.
     
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  10. gpcollen1

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    I am not familiar with this brand but have seen a similar product that is pretty amazing. You put down the base coat, which end up being the color of your grout. Then you tape with their tape, which is irregular to mimic a grout joint. The paint on color of your 'stone' and then pull tape 'grout'. Comes out pretty sweet. I am going to use it on my concrete walls around the outside of my garage...
     
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  11. Agent

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    I just got done re-doing our finished basement where the wall to wall carpet stank of the previous chain-smoking-in-the-house owners. I'm a big fan of the cheap and easy, and spotted a craigslist ad for a recycling company that had commercial carpet tiles for 30 cents a sq foot. This stuff was 21 years old, but 90% of it looked like it just came out of the factory and most importantly, it didn't stink.
    It's rubber backed and pretty short, so it won't really hold much water. Plus, individual tiles can be pulled up and replaced as desired.
     
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