1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Best ~ 70cc chainsaw. suggestion please

Post in 'The Gear' started by snydley, May 3, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. snydley

    snydley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    117
    Loc:
    Dansville NY (upstate)
    Nothing macho here, I'm just looking for a bigger and better saw than the 55cc. Craftsman I have.

    Well good for you! I guess you know it all and I have no idea at all what I'm doing. Thanks for clearing that up for me. :mad:

    I don't know where you got that from. I WISH all I needed was a couple of cords of firewood. My woodstove is now my primary source of heat. I don't know where you live, but in western NY state we need heat from AT LEAST Sept. - Apr. Hell, it was down in the 30's last night, and we had the stove going all night.
    [/quote]
    blah, blah, blah. Preach it to someone who gives a crap. :zip:

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. snydley

    snydley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    117
    Loc:
    Dansville NY (upstate)
    I see. I didn't realize that. I guess that's best if you support your dealer network. That's great, but surprising in this day and age, where the bottom dollar is all that seems to matter to corporate America.
  3. GrantC

    GrantC Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2008
    Messages:
    65
    Loc:
    Oregon
    As someone who tried to buy a Dolmar - at 4 different Dolmar dealers - before I bought my Shindaiwa, I can tell you that their policy isn't helping local dealers at all. Not only did I not buy my saw from them, I won't be patronizing them for the lucrative parts and accessories I'll be buying.

    -=[ Grant ]=-
  4. Oregon8888

    Oregon8888 New Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    5
    Loc:
    NW Oregon...near Banks
    I prefer a Stihl 440 with a 26" bar. chain speed is the most important and this saw, even at ~$750, is a wood monster. With the long bar you can cut standing up, of course with steel toe boots, chaps and eye/ear protection. Consider investing in a log Peavy to lift logs off the ground, as rocks and dirt eat chains. If the cost is too much, try the Stihl Wood Boss with a 20" bar. Both saws have great oilers, easy fill caps for oil and gas. I have both saws.

    Scott in Oregon
  5. TMonter

    TMonter Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1,443
    Loc:
    Hayden, ID
    For the money the Dolmar is a better performer in the same class compared to the Stihl 440 or the Husky 372XP. He's made the right choice if he's looking for the best power/weight ratio in a professional saw of that class. With more power you can always put a larger rim sprocket on the saw and get some additional chain speed, besides chain speed across all three saws will be similar.
  6. snydley

    snydley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    117
    Loc:
    Dansville NY (upstate)
    I'm sure it is, if you've got the $100. to spare. I can put it to better/different use here. I was looking for an approx. 70cc. saw. The Dolmar 73cc. 7300 is just what I'm looking for, and if it's as good as the 7900 I'll take it. Well, I WAS gonna take it, a 7900, for $679.95 from Amicks Superstore, but it looks like they won't mail order one. So now I have to see what kinda price I can get on one at a local dealer, which I'm sure won't be close. Then I'll have to compare prices to a comparable saw by Stihl and Husqvarna and get the better deal of the 3
  7. Sealcove

    Sealcove Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    Messages:
    212
    Loc:
    MDI - Maine
    You can order a 372XP for $699 (shipping included). That is a big jump from the craftsman to a pro saw like this; I would highly recommend getting some training, and making sure your PPE is in good order.

    http://www.wisesales.com/Huskysaws.html
  8. chad3

    chad3 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Messages:
    453
    Loc:
    Southeast CT
    The best power to weight ratio saw isn't the Dolmar anymore its the Solo 681. 6.4 hp at 13.9 lbs compared to the 6.3 at 13.6 and you can order them online at Bailey's. This saw flat out screams, but still as others were saying not something I would want to use for limbing. If dropping and bucking its where its at, but forget about it if you want to throw it around (figuratively).
    Chad
  9. downeast

    downeast Guest

    blah, blah, blah. Preach it to someone who gives a crap. :zip:[/quote]

    Touchy there boy. More time needed in the woods working.
    Oh yeah: "Maine" it says. Does have some cold weather from August to June.
    Go to it. :zip: it is.
    The Preacher.
  10. snydley

    snydley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    117
    Loc:
    Dansville NY (upstate)
    I like the price, but why do some of you people think I need some training, you don't even know me, or how many years I've run a chainsaw, or my experiences. Or is that just a canned response,(get some training), you tell everyone?.
  11. Sealcove

    Sealcove Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    Messages:
    212
    Loc:
    MDI - Maine
    I have run a saw professionally for 15 years, and I go through training every single year. I still pickup new things, fine tune my methods, and realize that I have developed bad habits over the year. I was assuming that since your primary saw was a classic homeowner saw (nothing wrong with that), that you may never have had any proper training, and if that is the case I would highly recommend it before making a big leap. Even if you have had training, it may be a good time to consider recurrent training. This is not meant to be patronizing advice, as there is no room for attitude when working with saws.

    Good luck with your selection, and safe cutting.
  12. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    8,986
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    I've had similar problems when I ask (elsewhere) about which electrode to use for my stick welder. "Take a welding class" is the typical canned advice. Yes a chainsaw can hurt and kill you. If you recognize that then I recommend that you learn by doing.
  13. snydley

    snydley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    117
    Loc:
    Dansville NY (upstate)
    I agree. If I was cutting down giant redwood trees in California, or some specialized cutting, then a class is in order, but to just cut a few log loads for firewood a year, and maybe cut down an occasional tree that's nowhere near anything that it might fall on, I don't know if that's necessary. As long as a person is aware of the danger involved and is careful that's good enough in this case.
  14. downeast

    downeast Guest

    Take offense or be intelligent Snydley. Those saws you think are right for you are for well-trained professionals.....I wouldn't have anyone "fire in the hole" near me with Semtex . Don't know what it is ? Then listen. Learn.
    Got your own woodlands to work ? Can't cut a 36" with a 20" bar ? Tune the saw, sharpen the chain right, learn technique.
    HP has nothing to do with cutting efficiency. Bar length has little to do with pro cutting EXCEPT in the PNW with DBH over 3'. Don't know PNW or DBH ? Don't think PPE is worth a damn, huh ? .
    You get touchy about advice, fine. It's too obvious that your experience is slight. But never demean those of us who offer advice FROM EXPERIENCE. Ignore it, fine. Too macho to learn, fine. You got a disease : Ready, fire, aim. :p
    Try this on another site that deals strictly with all the varieties of using arborist tools: ArboristSite or Forestry Forum. Get off your chair and get out and watch arborists, or loggers.
    When you stop learning, don't come down for breakfast. %-P
  15. snydley

    snydley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    117
    Loc:
    Dansville NY (upstate)
    You know what, don't even bother writing to me anymore. You have tons of experience, blah blah blah. Talk about macho,(words that came from your hands). I don't believe a 70cc pro saw is too much for me, and nothing you say is gonna change my mind. It's not a friggin' bazooka or field artillery or something I know nothing about, even though you want to blow your own horn and tell me I don't know what I'm getting into etc., etc. YOU HAVE NO F***KIN' IDEA WHO I AM OR MY EXPERIENCE LEVEL!!!! I just came onto this site looking for advice on 70cc pro saws, and you have to kick your weight around and act like I'm a little kid that knows nothing. Let me tell you something, I've been around a long time, and I don't need YOU to tell me what I should do, if it's anything more than suggestions about 70cc saws. So anything more than that, KEEP IT TO YOURSELF!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  16. kevin j

    kevin j Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    555
    Loc:
    minnesota us
    I'd suggest you post the Q on arboristsite saw forum.

    I think you will get good info, and also a whole chorus echoing what Maine is saying.

    No tree should be treated as anything less than serious. the closest call I have ever had was less than 20 dbh stump about 20 feet tall. Can't get much more basic than that. and the mind slipped because it was 'so easy' almost got me. And, yes I have done this for a while.

    Personally, I'd go the Dolmar for what you describe. Some of the others are overkill, some under.
    The 7900 will be my next saw. I won't even look at the smaller two in that frame.


    sorry if you are offended, best wishes

    k
  17. downeast

    downeast Guest

    Prozac :zip:
  18. snydley

    snydley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    117
    Loc:
    Dansville NY (upstate)
    Well, I get offended when I ask for suggestions on a saw, and instead of that,(only from a couple of people), I get, "that saw's too big", "take a safety course", "I can do that with an 18" bar" and on and on. I'm not a kid, 52yrs., and I'm certainly not an idiot. I know the things are dangerous, and treat them with respect. I didn't come on here to be preached about safety, and if someone doesn't have any good suggestions pertaining to a particular saw or brand, I'd rather they kept their comments to themselves! I have a 55cc, 18" bar Craftsman chainsaw that seems to be a little underpowered for some of the big trunks I need to cut up, so I'm looking for something better. I figured on a 70cc saw, thinking a 55cc Stihl, or Husqvarna, or Dolmar would give me pretty much the same as what I have now. Would it, or would it not, I don't know, but I'm not willing to buy one the same size and find that it's not much better than what I have now. And I don't know where anyone ever got the idea that I don't think cutting a tree down is serious business. It's deadly serious, I know it, and I don't need to be reminded with every reply written to me. Like the message you just wrote to me, you could have left out everything before "Personally I'd go for the Dolmar" and that'd been great. ;-)
  19. jawquin

    jawquin Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    38
    Loc:
    Quincy, IN
  20. Sealcove

    Sealcove Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    Messages:
    212
    Loc:
    MDI - Maine
    Sorry I will keep my experienced advice to myself from now on and only tell you what you want to hear. Attitude has no place behind a chainsaw. Be safe.
  21. chad3

    chad3 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Messages:
    453
    Loc:
    Southeast CT
    k[/quote]

    Well, I get offended when I ask for suggestions on a saw, and instead of that,(only from a couple of people), I get, "that saw's too big", "take a safety course", "I can do that with an 18" bar" and on and on. I'm not a kid, 52yrs., and I'm certainly not an idiot. I know the things are dangerous, and treat them with respect. I didn't come on here to be preached about safety, and if someone doesn't have any good suggestions pertaining to a particular saw or brand, I'd rather they kept their comments to themselves! I have a 55cc, 18" bar Craftsman chainsaw that seems to be a little underpowered for some of the big trunks I need to cut up, so I'm looking for something better. I figured on a 70cc saw, thinking a 55cc Stihl, or Husqvarna, or Dolmar would give me pretty much the same as what I have now. Would it, or would it not, I don't know, but I'm not willing to buy one the same size and find that it's not much better than what I have now. And I don't know where anyone ever got the idea that I don't think cutting a tree down is serious business. It's deadly serious, I know it, and I don't need to be reminded with every reply written to me. Like the message you just wrote to me, you could have left out everything before "Personally I'd go for the Dolmar" and that'd been great. ;-)[/quote]

    When you are asking to go from a Craftsman to a pro saw, most in the know will ask a few questions. There is a HUGE difference. Even going from what you have to a pro Stihl (I have a 036 and a 361 it beyond what is imaginable). Going to something in the 70+ range is a large jump. As others have said, just be careful. I've cut about 20+ cords so far between this fall and know and have been good for about 90% with my 361. We also have a 75cc and a 80+cc saw and they are great for the big wod, but I can still get through it if I needed to with the 361. I think that this is another thing that these guys are trying to say. Lets not get into arguments but instead listening to what is said and taking it for what is said.
    Go with what you what but I really think you would be happy with something in the 60-75 cc range.
    Chad

    Mainer,
    I like your thoughts........
  22. snydley

    snydley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    117
    Loc:
    Dansville NY (upstate)
    No attitude here, or were you talking about yours? :lol: If I was asking for advice on safety, or training, then I would welcome it. But I'm not, I'm asking for advice on a new saw. Instead of people telling me WHAT the difference is between a 55cc Craftsman saw and a Stihl 361 59cc saw,(for example), I'm getting,"70cc's too big" you need a safety course", "training, training" from people. I really CAN appreciate that, but it's not helping me choosing a new saw, and then I'm the bad guy with the attitude because I point out that THAT is not what I was asking for. I've YET to have someone say, "you really don't need a 70cc. pro saw, a 59cc will give you everything you need in a saw because it's,(fill in the blank with a valid explanation). I'm under the assumption that there isn't going to be much difference between my 55cc. Craftsman and a Stihl 361 with a 59cc engine, it's only 4cc., if there is a big difference then WHAT is it? Believe me, I don't want to spend the extra $$$ for a bigger saw than I need, but I also don't want to buy a saw 4ccs bigger and find it's not much better than what I already have.
  23. snydley

    snydley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    117
    Loc:
    Dansville NY (upstate)
    Ok, you say there is a HUGE difference. I'd like someone to explain to me what the HUGE difference in my 55cc Craftsman, and a 361 Stihl 59cc? I'm sure it's built better, is smoother etc.,(like the difference between a 1970 Chevy Impalla and a Cadillac, if they had similar engines), but explain to me WHY it's gonna perform better, say with both having new chains, and 18" bars etc. I don't see how 4cc is gonna make that much of a difference in power and cutting, but I CAN see how going from 55cc to 70cc is gonna make a difference. This all started because I was cutting an approx. 36" locust. Once it was horizontal and I was cutting the lower trunk, the full bar was buried in the trunk and the Craftsman was having a hard time of it, wanting to stall, kicking back etc., and yes the chain was a sharp chain. It really felt like the tree was too big for the saw.
    As far as listening goes, I haven't yet heard why a Stihl 361,(for example). is gonna be all I need. Like I told one of the other guys, I don't want to spend more $$ than is necessary on a saw that's bigger than I need, but I don't want to buy a saw that's 4ccs bigger and find that I just bought a saw that's nicer than what I have, but really doesn't perform much better.
  24. chad3

    chad3 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Messages:
    453
    Loc:
    Southeast CT
    It is more like the difference between a stock 350 and a race motor. Two saws that are the same cc will not have the same power. Even look at two saws at the Stihl website:
    MS310: 59cc, 4.0 hp, wt 13.0 lb

    MS361: 59cc, 4.4 hp, wt 12.3 lb

    They are both the same cc, but the pro model has an extra 1/2 horse (alot in a small saw) as well as 1/2 lb lighter. These two equate to more power to weight as well as less weight to hold the saw down (if that makes sense).
  25. kevin j

    kevin j Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    555
    Loc:
    minnesota us
    I think best bet is to find a good dealer and try out some saws.
    Yes, there is a big difference in quality and hp and feel and productivity for the same size engine.

    Without a sense of what a pound or .5 hp feels like in a saw, the numbers won't mean so much.
    After using a couple good saws, you will know what one feels right.


    k
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page