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Best Sealant for Sealing Air Leaks in Stove Pipe???

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by BurnIt13, Feb 10, 2012.

  1. BurnIt13

    BurnIt13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    I've been having some troubles with my fires lately and it dawned on my that the troubles started when I gave my chimney/stove pipe. I used the SootEater to clean out the pipe from the bottom up.

    Anywho...I didn't have any incense sticks but I lit a match and the flame almost got blown out buy the suction through the stove pipe seams. Obviously, I need to seal them up.

    Does anyone make a flexible silicone based sealant that will survive very high temps? I know Rutland has a silicone version that will survive up to 600 degrees but I don't think that will survive near the stove collar. I have double wall chimney/stove pipe and the 600F silicone would probably be fine except for the first few feet off the stove.

    There is also Rutland's Hi-Temp Stove and Gasket Cement. I'm sure it would do a good job sealing but how does it doesn't appear to be flexible once cured. How does it hold up to vibrations and the natural expansion/contraction of the metal pipe? The stove pipe does get banged around a bit when the SootEater is going through there.

    Any suggestions?

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  2. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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  3. BurnIt13

    BurnIt13 Minister of Fire

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    Thank you. How "clean" is this stuff? My stove pipe is pretty and I'd hate to make it look like I smeared peanut butter all over it. I initially thought silicone just because of the ease of using a caulking gun.
  4. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    You take the pipe apart and put it on the joints as you put back together, if done right you wont see it.
  5. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    The stuff in the picture that I shared w/ you is black in color, so that helps also.

    The stuff I used wasn't black and I had to be much more careful with it.

    pen
  6. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    As an additional note, if the cleaning is what caused your problem, I would think that this issue would have been present when you first started using this system when new and clean.

    Sure you didn't seperate something when doing the cleaning? Or even partially block the cap w/ a chunk of creosote that didn't bust up? Put a baffle back incorrectly?

    I'm asking because usually a problem like this would be an ongoing issue, and not something that suddenly appears.

    pen
  7. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Don't be afraid to smear it on. Put the pipe together and take an old rag and wet it. The excess wipes right off very easily.

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