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Big rock in a hole. How to remove?

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by begreen, Sep 9, 2012.

  1. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    That connection then, the post holder to the post, will provide nearly zero strength against the post falling over. Unless there is a very long sleeve that runs over the post, like several feet, the lateral strength of the system is ruined abd all you get is vertical strength.

    I didn't plan on concrete backfill, just the footing cookie under the pole but the engineering was very certain that it was required. More than one structural engineer since I got three bids. To be fair, my location must design for 115 mph wind loads and the building is 30x60 so a lot of exposure on the big side with not much width.

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  2. basod

    basod Minister of Fire

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    I'm guessing the narrow nature of the hole may exclude a feather/wedge from being used.
    I'd try a rotary/hammer drill and see how far an 18" bit will go. You may go through the stone and see soil tailings - if not than time to call in the backhoe
  3. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear Minister of Fire

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    Pen,

    There are multiple pressure treatments and any ground contact rated can be set in concrete.

    The normal PT stuff is for above ground only, no ground contact allowed.
  4. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Yep - generally 3 ratings. Above ground, ground contact/underground and submersible (water, think piers, docks, etc.).
  5. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    Lowes sells 2 types the higher rated wood is more expensive.
  6. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    And I believe they can special order the third (at least around here they can), but they don't stock it.
  7. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Think both. Where's that excavator that tore down the old garage? Many mini's are able to take a hammer attachment. Or you/the company could rent one and pound through.
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I called the guy with the excavator. He was bummed out and chagrined to tell me his young apprentice had flipped it. Not sure when it will be back online.

    After spending most of a day flaking granite with a jackhammer it was decided that this rock is staying. The engineers are penciling out a rebar and cement overshoe solution. And our project slips another week.
  9. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Cool, you found one of those huge granite boulders. They are so rare that there are specail names for them, like irregulars or oddballs, or something. We have to write contract provisions for just in case one is encountered while putting in a water main or something.
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I have a property full of them. We have 2 large ones that we discovered when landscaping for the greenhouse. They are like 60" x 40" x 24". I was amazed that the guy was able to move them with his excavator. And many more 1-3 man granite rocks were discovered and used for garden walls and features. The local gravel yard is also full of them. I think they grow here.
  11. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    We affectionately call them "donikers". I hope it is not some sort of racial slur or anything it is just what the construction guys have always called them and the name sticks. A big old donicker fell into the trench from the sidewall.

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