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Black Locust?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by katwillny, Oct 13, 2009.

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  1. katwillny

    katwillny Guest

    I have three rather large Black Locust trees in my backyard that are very mature and are almost a threat to my tool shed. Not to mention that they have thorns on their branches and its constantly pricking my kids since they refuse to wear shoes. What is the general consensus on burning Black Locust?
    A: Good?
    B: Bad?
    C: Impartial?
    D: I wouldn’t get that junk near my stove?

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  2. 3fordasho

    3fordasho Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
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    South Central Minnesota
    It's rated higher on the btu/lb scale than white oak. Like ash, low moisture content even when green. Premium firewood.


  3. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    Syracuse NY
    Very good. Make sure your chain is good and sharp.
  4. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    Croton-on-Hudson, suburbs of NYC
    Excellent stuff. I'll come and help for a truck load.
  5. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    What I should have said is D: I wouldn’t get that junk near my stove?. But if you cut it down, I'll haul it away for you for cheap.
  6. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    That stuff is at the top of the food chain, it's hard to beat it... just be careful working with it (the thorns).
  7. wayneg

    wayneg Member

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    Loc:
    Western Pa
    In my Jotul F100 I've burned oak, maple, pine, elm, ash, and black locust. I would say black locust is one of my favorites. Burns great, burns hot. Most of the logs I get are fairly straight-grained so it splits easily too, which I appreciate as I split all my wood by hand.
  8. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    Good. Nay, great. Best firewood there is, IMO.
  9. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    I toss the big crotches in the bonfire pile...they are brutal.
  10. katwillny

    katwillny Guest

    Thanks all for the replies. I got home today and cut one down. The smallest one next to the tool shed. Ill continue to work on it tomorrow as it got too dark and the wife tells me that its not a good idea to operate a chain saw in poor light. Nurses, what do they know about cuttin, choppin, splittin... . ha ha ha.
  11. Rockey

    Rockey Minister of Fire

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    I threw a good sized split in the insert last night before I nodded off and turned the air intake way down. When I woke up I turned the blower off even though the stove was still making decent heat becuase it never got that cold last night. When I got home from work today, about 5:00 there were red coals in the stove when I looked in the insert. A great wood to burn when seasoned
  12. 84Buckeye

    84Buckeye New Member

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    Loc:
    Ohio
    I processed about 10 trees this last spring- 18" DIA.. As said- be VERY careful with the branches.. those things aggrevate something
    terrible if they get down in your skin... only takes a couple hours and they'll have you digging with anything to get them out!!

    I gave all mine to father and he loves it! Burns hot and long!
  13. mike1234

    mike1234 New Member

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    My method of dealing with them: cut them down, cut away all small branches, have a burn pile right there, don't want to have to drag them far.
    Take a very very sharp axe to the needles, work all the way up the trunk and any big branches, roll it over, do it again.
    Then take the chain saw to cut it to size.
    This seems to work for me, but dealing with those smaller branches is still a pain, a real pain.

  14. rphurley

    rphurley Feeling the Heat

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    As a nurse, I can say that 1 year ago, I knew very little. With the help of this forum I have learned a great deal!
  15. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    Next time just tell her you'll be out side minding your own business.
  16. marsfarmer

    marsfarmer New Member

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    RI
    Ever wonder why locusts have those big nasty thorns? Some scientists figured it out and it's pretty interesting: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=19171697

    Also I'd just mention that while locust is awesome firewood it's also the most rot-resistant wood you can get in the North, ideal for fenceposts.
  17. waynek

    waynek Member

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    I cherish and protect my grove of Black locust. The grove comprises about one and one-half acres and is expanding through the root system. Oak wilt and Dutch elm disease is taking their toll on not only my woodlot but through out the region. Now the ash trees may be threatened by the EAB. The Black locust seems to be a hardy tree and in the last 40 years of observing the tree, I have not seen any mortality contributed to insects or bacteria, therefore I continue to cultivate it.

    The Department of Natural Resources wants to keep the tree out their managed grasslands, prairie and savanna communities so I often am permited to remove the trees for firewood. Oops! I just revealed a good source of firewood...now I may have competition from my good Wisconsin friends on this board.
    jackpine
  18. katwillny

    katwillny Guest

    Very interesting story marsfarmer. I wonder if we humans would evolved into creatures that would grow a thick skin on our palms that would prevent us from getting burned while loading a woodstove. Like gloves you know?
  19. TreePapa

    TreePapa Minister of Fire

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    "Someone now has to look carefully through the petrified mastodon feces samples stored at museums around the area and find honey locust fruit in the gut of a long-dead mastodon. Such a finding, as the lawyers say, would be persuasive. Robinson says he has access to a large mastodon sample, and with admirable enthusiasm, is planning to take a close look sometime soon. "

    The things people do for science.

    Peace,
    - Sequoia
  20. marsfarmer

    marsfarmer New Member

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    I'm just glad I don't have to worry about GIANT HAIRY ELEPHANTS eating my firewood.
    Fireproof hands does seem like a good evolutionary advantage, also split maul hands would be cool.
  21. marsfarmer

    marsfarmer New Member

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    I'd love to hear more about how you manage the grove. I'm starting to cut some of the soft maple that is currently shading my little stand of locust and try to let the suckers take over the hillside. Any tips?
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