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Blaze King Ashford is up and running!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by webby3650, Oct 16, 2013.

  1. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

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    Right, you put in 100 lbs of wood for a 24 hour burn in a 1500' home. I put about 30lbs of wood in for a 12 to 16 hour burn, in a 2200' house. That's about exactly what my neighbor and I have concluded after comparisons late last winter.

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  2. HotCoals

    HotCoals Minister of Fire

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    There are only so many btus in a pound of wood you know..lol.
    I doubt there is that much diff in the two stoves as far as extracting those btu's..just saying. Cheers!
  3. Dustin

    Dustin Feeling the Heat

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    Like the comedian Louis CK says, "like everything else on the Internet, it's just arguing." :)

    Love the stove! Planning to move in a year, stove shopping now, and this has made the list!

    Wife likes the PH, I like the BK. In our mild Oregon climate (40's and damp all winter) a bk may do it
  4. alforit

    alforit Feeling the Heat

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    Webby,

    Have you been burning the Cape Cod along with the Ashford to see how they compare ?
  5. TX-L

    TX-L Burning Hunk

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    So, now you do think that a 24 hour burn is possible in the dead of winter?

    Your neighbor burns 3X the amount of wood you do? WTF? There is no reason that a properly functioning BK would burn that much more than a PH at any time of year. Every year I use about 1/3 less wood than my buddy's Quadrafire 3100 and another's Quad Isle Royale (I know they're not cat stoves). Even though it holds much more wood per load, the BK is very wood miserly, be it a single burn cycle or over an entire heating season. I would think the BK and PH would be similar in usage; maybe something is out of whack with the neighbor's BK?
    There is a LOT of fuel left in the BK after a 24 hour cycle. 100 lb loads are not the norm, as you really have to pack the wood carefully and pick out just the right pieces to fit together, which isn't something that I regularly do, and the nature of the wood's shape doesn't always allow it. A normal load cycle, once per day, is: I rake the coals to the front, open the air up full to burn down the coals, and the stovetop goes to 500+ ::F for a few hours before reload. It would easily go 30+ hours without touching it and still be 350-400ish stovetop temp, but that screws up my loading and sleeping schedule. Sometimes I go 1-1/2 days, when I have a day off or on a weekend. If it's -30 ::F overnight, I will burn it a little hotter and use the blowers, so the reload time is reduced somewhat.

    But I have a King model, let's get back to the Ashford!
  6. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    100 lbs? I better start weighing my wood....
  7. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    I think webby is our our best source of true data...same house, tries many different stoves. Yes there are always more variables, (wood, weather) but he provides pretty good data.
    webby3650, jeff_t and Joful like this.
  8. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    Yes, my glass stayed nice and clean burning at a higher setting with a nice flame show. It's just those long 24 hour burns that dirty up the glass.
  9. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    Your neighbor is a really bad example! It think the great state of Alaska would be a good example, if they performed poorly in the cold why would most houses in Alaska have a King?
    Just face it dude, the PH isn't for everybody! It's a great stove, I'm sure. There is no way it can compare to a Kings burn times, a comparable sized stove sure, but not a king. You have no real experience with a Blaze King or any other EPA stove would be my guess.
    jeff_t and Highbeam like this.
  10. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    That's true, but its just a different kinda burn. The cape cod is more like a fireplace, beautiful burn but is more like a 12-16 hr stove. The Ashford can burn with big active flames ,once its reduced it looks like it just goes out. And the glass gets a little dirty on the sides like most BKs. The advantage is a 20-30 hr burn, even in the winter time. :mad:
    If a beautiful fire is what your after, then it might not be your thing.
  11. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    My Firelight 12's are exactly the same way. When I crank them down, it's a steady glow with an occasional flame licking up. Stovetop at 300F, cat at 1200F. In fact, they shut down so tight that I get back-puffing on the one with the shorter flue, if I try to dial it down all the way. No such trouble on the one with the taller flue, though.

    My point is that it's good to have the option to burn both ways. I shut mine down tight for overnight, or when I'm not home, and burn them with a little flame when we get home in the evenings and want to pump a little more heat. It's nice to have a stove that provides that full range of burn rates, and I don't think any stove can match BK's technology, in this regard.
    webby3650 likes this.
  12. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    This is a great summary. BK is the most efficient stove. This means that nomatter what, no stove will do the same job for less wood. Kinda blows any PH argument out of the water. Then you have the ABILITY to CHOOSE between extremely long or short burn times. That is unique to the BK, no other stove has that range of operation. Other than looks, I see no place where PH is superior, and there's more to life than a pretty face, the ugly ones try harder.

    I weighed a load into my BK princess, a full load of our relatively soft wood and it was only 43 lbs. Easily ran 24 hours before reload.

    If BK had the ashford available when I bought my princess, I would have likely bought it instead. Underneath, the ashford is the same size but with cleaner emissions so there are some tweaks. No idea how they tweaked it to be cleaner but they retained the burn times so it must have been smart. I haven't looked at the chart in awhile, did BK lose some efficiency in order to reduce emissions on the ashord/chinook30 box?
  13. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

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    Most houses in Alaska have 30 year old barrels heating the home. Your kidding right?

    I'm not sure why you keep bringing in the PH? We are discussing the BK. And the PH is only a 2.8 box, the BKK is what, a 4.3 box. BIG difference.

    Yes, in a smaller house with no blowers on, not at -10 outside with blowers and real heat. But my personal observation was, when it was cold out and he needed lots of heat, he did not get anywhere near 24 hours.

    Again, the PH is a 2.8 box, the BK is a 4.3 box, much different. I do not think there is anything wrong with his bk, it performs nicely. Like I said, he loves it in the shoulders (now and last spring), he gets great long slow burns, and doesn't care he can't see a fire, he just wants a bit of heat to take the chill out of the house. But the performance was much different in the dead of winter when it was really burning and heating. There is a big difference between heating a home, and just warming a stove on a long burn.

    You guys keep saying "I don't use much wood....", but over in the wood threads, your posting you burn 8 and 10 cord a year. Which is it?

    -30 overnight? Really? It hasn't hit anywhere near -30 air temperature in NY state in many many many many many years.
    Oldhippie likes this.
  14. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

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    Jotul was comparing a Cape Cod to a BK. Somehow you change it to a PH vs BK? You have somekind of PH paranoai?
    Oldhippie and Highbeam like this.
  15. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

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    Here's a quesiton, to get back on track:

    How does the Ashford compare to the Chinook? Specs wise anyway, since I doubt anyone has had both .....?
    Oldhippie likes this.
  16. johnstra

    johnstra Feeling the Heat

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    We're discussing the Ashford... I think it has a 2.75 box. Webby will be able to give us good reports on relative wood consumption as we get into winter.
  17. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    The Ashford, Sirocco and Chinook are built around the same 2.75 fire box and should have identical burns and output.
  18. ewdudley

    ewdudley Minister of Fire

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  19. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    The BK is ideal for the NW climate. It was designed to burn our softwoods very frugally.
  20. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

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    WOW, never thought of that! I bet they do great with those softwoods that normally burn to fast..... suprised we don't hear more about that?
    Oldhippie likes this.
  21. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    I was not kidding about Alaska,
    maybe I forgot to mention that. All my burns so far have been with tulip, and a few pieces of cherry. It excels with soft wood!
  22. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Have to second that fact. BK stoves are very popular in Alaska. People living there can't afford to have their stove go out before they return from work.
  23. Builder Bob

    Builder Bob Member

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    Webby, any idea when this stove will really hit the market and be available to see in a showroom??
  24. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    From the NY State Climate Office:
  25. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    Lot's of good points in this thread.
    Let's remember that comparisons of heating different homes need to consider the houses' insulation and tightness, as well as the owners' temp preference. i.e keeping a drafty place @75° vs. a tight place @70°. (Of course, we all know this, but I didn't see it mentioned in this thread, so. . .)
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2013

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