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Bucking Big Wood

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by xman23, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. xman23

    xman23 Minister of Fire

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    Well what's big for me may not be for you, but ......This is about a 2' oak out in the woods in back of my cabin. At that size I need to do things a bit different. First I need to keep the tree trunk in the air. My secret tool is a 2 ton floor jack. It can get into a 3 inch space. Amazing what it can lift. Next issue is 18" bar can't cut clear across. So I alternate from side to side. This can be a bit hard to keep the cut straight. My method, alternate a lot. Then moving the rounds. Just about imposable to get this size rounds into my new woods trailer. I have a 2' ball on the ATV and tow the splitter to the tree.

    Lift the tree, cut a few rounds, split a few, load the splits in the trailer, ride slow back to the house, stack, 10 minute break , repeat for the next few days.

    That's what I do, do you have any work saver methods?

    Here's a few pictures

    Tom

    image 1.jpeg image 3.jpeg
    image 2.jpeg View attachment 109580
    gmule, n3pro, Hills Hoard and 4 others like this.

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  2. swagler85

    swagler85 Minister of Fire

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    Seem to have a good plan! Keep up the hard work and soon you will have a good stack of great BTUs
  3. Gark

    Gark Minister of Fire

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    That is a whoppin' big tree. I think your method is downright innovative. Up till now, I would through-cut an 18 incher from the middle and roll it away. Then through-cut every 6 feet and cut those about 2/3 down every 18 inches, roll it over and finish the partial cuts.
    ScotO likes this.
  4. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Sounds to me like you have a decent method and it seems to work pretty good for you! Good job!
    When I buck up big trees and I have no access to a jack out in the woods (or wherever, for that matter) I do things a bit differently. I put the big log into pieces, marking out and cutting 2/3rds down each round as I work along the log. I'll go every 6' or so on the really big ones, dig out a little bit of material that is under the log, and cut straight down through the log. If you're bar is at risk of getting pinched, keep several plastic wedges with you (or make some out of good hardwood like hard maple or locust). as you get deeper into the log on your cut, pound a couple of those wedges into the kerf at the 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock positions. Then, continue right down through the log, slowly, into the area under the log that you cleared out.

    Then, go back along those 6-8' logs, roll them either manually or with a cant hook or pickaroon, and finish the final 1/3rd of your individual rounds. I've done some REALLY big trees this way (oaks and ash, maples etc, in the 36-50" range) the biggest ones I had some help rolling....oh and they get split right on the spot too!
  5. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    When the bar isn't long enough to go clear thru, I find it best to start the cut reaching over the log, so the saw is near vertical with the nose down. Continue working back towards you and down the side. It gives you a good kerf to work the other side, and makes for a straighter cut. A good grind on the chain is a must.

    +1 on the wedges.
  6. Capetownkg

    Capetownkg Member

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    Sounds like you got it covered. I recently did a big 32" diameter red oak. I did like Scotty was saying. I dont know if its "young dumb energy" or what but I dont like to split on location. So i rolled mine up out of the woods by hand (dont have a 4 wheeler).
    Skipped going to the gym for the week and got it done so wasn't to shabby.

    Attached Files:

    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  7. Locust Post

    Locust Post Minister of Fire

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    I do similar to Scotty...make my cuts down through part of the way then find a spot I can cut clear through and roll it over. I don't ever split on sight but if they are too big to pick up I either split a little bit off or just take a plank and roll them up on the truck. Your floor jack method sounds like it works for you and you don't have to worry about getting in the dirt that way.....Carry on :)
    ScotO likes this.
  8. HittinSteel

    HittinSteel Minister of Fire

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    I use a 100cc saw and roll the log like Scotty. Once I get it bucked, I quarter the rounds to make them manageable. Finish by gathering up a trash bag of the "noodles" to use as fire starter.
    Thistle, JOHN BOY and ScotO like this.
  9. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    I hear you there! Any reason to fire up the 100cc saw, that alone makes the work seem more like play, don't it?;)
    Backwoods Savage and Thistle like this.
  10. HittinSteel

    HittinSteel Minister of Fire

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    Sure does....... and it just pukes noodles:) No replacement for displacement when blocking!
  11. JOHN BOY

    JOHN BOY Minister of Fire

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    Excellent work , honestly the only way to speed up those kinda tree's is to have the 70 plus cc saw. Yea the 260 pro will do it (nice saw ) ! This is One reason i have an 044. Makes work so much faster.
    If you dont have the money for a Biggr stihl or husky saw , you could always keep a eye out for a old poulan or Mac. Not the greatest for high R.P.M.S but they have tons of torque. I had an old poulan 5200, thing was
    a beast.
    ScotO and Thistle like this.
  12. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    Yep. Once you make the vertical cut on the other side of the log deep enough so your bar can handle the rest, start tilting the bar back towards you with most of the bar still in the vertical cut. That way your horizontal cut stays in line with the vertical cut.

    If I'm getting the wood away from home, I'll just bust 'em down with a maul or wedges far enough so that I can lift 'em onto the trailer, then finish the splitting at home.
    Hickorynut, ScotO and JOHN BOY like this.
  13. amateur cutter

    amateur cutter Minister of Fire

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    What they said, except I leave the log on the ground, cut almost through, bust the round off with a wedge, tip it up, split small enough to load, & repeat. 2' Dia oak is heavy enough to be a bit of work, but not terrible. When they get 4' & up it sucks. A C
    Backwoods Savage and ScotO like this.
  14. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    Its impossible to buck a 2' log with an 18" bar unless you cut blocks out of the end. Meaning you cut halfway through then you noodle that half off so the saw can get closer to the part to be cut.
  15. bigbarf48

    bigbarf48 Minister of Fire

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    2 feet is only 24 inches so an 18" bar could get through with some see-sawing unless I'm missing something.

    I took on a biiig red oak (in my avatar pic) with a 20" bar and started the cut angled to the side I was on getting it deep enough for a good start then following that kerf ran a line up over and down to the other side, then I switch sides. Toward the end I did a little cutting squatted on the top too!
  16. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    Your right. Not sure what I was thinking g?? I was thinking 40+"s??? I don't really think anything under 30" s is all that big.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  17. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    A good chain makes a world of difference. Do you have a full chisel chain?
  18. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    Another thing I try to do is put a few limbs or logs underneath and perpendicular to the trunk so that when I cut some rounds, the remaining trunk falls onto the perpendicular supports, which leaves the trunk off the ground.
    ScotO likes this.
  19. xman23

    xman23 Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the feedback, you guys are the real deal, hard core. Scotty, The jack works great. On top a flat rock or 6' round. I always wanted to use wedges just never had any. I'm always working around not having them. Anyone know if the big box stores have them, tractor supply, etc.?

    I will give the vertical cut down the opposite side before the horizontal cut method, to make a straight cut.

    Yes I do love my 12 year old 260 pro. What a great one saw solution. Of course a big saw would be the thing to have.

    Before towing the splitter out in the woods, I hit the fresh wet 2' rock oak with a maul. To my surprise it bounced off of the wood that splits easy after drying a few months. This was the first time I split in the woods. Wow it was a big work saver with this size rounds. They had to be split, so why deal with moving 150 pound rounds. The rounds in the trailer is the small stuff.

    Checkout my helpers

    image 4.jpeg
  20. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    I've bought many plastic wedges at TSC.
    JOHN BOY likes this.
  21. paul bunion

    paul bunion Minister of Fire

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    You can always use a splinter, chunk of wood, bark or sticks as a substitute for a wedge. Obviously not as good as a wedge but they can prevent a kerf from closing up and are better than nothing.
    ailanthus and ScotO like this.
  22. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee Minister of Fire

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    I get 'em at HF, $4 ea. If you have a store, you don't have to pay shipping.
    http://www.harborfreight.com/felling-wedge-69539.html
    TreePointer likes this.
  23. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Nice helpers !

    Smart to get the heavy rounds down to a manageable size, will help keep the back healthy ;)
  24. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    If you notched the tree to fall it, then cut the big wedge into smaller ones. Usually one time use but they work well.
    The technique is called "over-bucking" I believe.
  25. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    What you can do in that case is to chip off the edges instead of trying to split it down the middle. Once you take an edge or two off, it's usually pretty easy to split the remainder normally.

    Failing those places, you can probably get 'em at the saw shop, though they might cost more....

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