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Building a raised tiled hearth for a pellet stove again! Nice day for raised hearth building!

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by Don2222, Nov 21, 2011.

  1. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Hello

    So now since my shed is done I had some left over lumber to build a raised hearth for it!!
    So I started cutting the frame while my carpenter still is around so I could use his framing nailer! Cool tool, but the recoil was making me pull the trigger twice until he showed me the proper way to use it !!! LOL Has anyone done this?

    I also had 1/4" smooth birch plywood so I threw that in the bottom. This way I can put a door on the hearth front and have a nice cubby to store all the tools. Is that a good idea?

    See pics below.

    Let's see put the red laser beam on the pencil line made with the framing square. LOL This is fun!

    Attached Files:

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  2. Waterbug

    Waterbug Member

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    Looks good, but I don't see that 1/4" plywood anywhere. The bottom appears to be 5/8" or 3/4". If you are talking about the subflooring for the tiled floor, I'd use 5/8" or 3/4" subflooring random strand board with Dura-Rock or a simular tile backer board under the tile.
  3. smoke show

    smoke show Guest

    Looks like the 1/4" is on the lower frame portion.
  4. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    The 1/4" birch plywood is in the bottom of the 2nd picture. It will be the bottom for the storage area under the hearth.

    The top of the hearth will be the 5/8 or 3/4 inch plywood with the cement board on top. I have not done that yet.

    As you can see in the 3rd pic I only have the 2x4s on the top right now.
  5. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    That is correct. That is only for the storage area.
  6. Waterbug

    Waterbug Member

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    I enlarged the picture and see that you are probably right. I didn't realize that there were 2X4 at the bottom. I thought that it was 5/8" ply on the floor. I would have done that rather than pile tools on 1/4" ply. That pedistal floor will end up 8" off of the floor. (2 ea. 1 1/2 boards, 1 ea. 3 1/2 board, 1 ea 1/4" board, 1 ea. 5/8" board, 1 ea 1/2" tile backer, 1 ea 1/4" tile)

    EDIT: I was replying at the same time that you were. Looks good ! If anything, it's overkill, but better overkill than sloppy. :)
  7. smoke show

    smoke show Guest

    I'm thinkin you could park a small car on that sucker.
  8. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Yes, thanks I like a high hearth it makes the stove look bigger and better. LOL

    My tools will not be to heavy for the 1/4" bottom. I made a similar hearth for the basement and used PT 2x4s on the bottom just in case any water pipes broke!

    So that is why I like the tool storage to be a little bit off the floor.
  9. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Yes It is strong enough for any type of stove!

    Instead of buying one of those fancy Stove Shop tiled hearths for $275.00 the one I am making will be much better for alot less cost!!!
  10. Waterbug

    Waterbug Member

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    I did a brick hearth with bricks that were left over from the construction of my home years ago. All it cost me was the mortar and a little sweat. (and a lot of advice/criticism from the wife. :) )

    EDIT: If you have concerns about moisture, those ground/floor contact 2X4s should be treated lumber.
  11. DneprDave

    DneprDave Burning Hunk

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    I made a tiled hearth out of cement Wonderboard and ceramic tile, that I got at a building surplus place. I cemented the two pieces of Wonderboard together with tile adhesive and stuck and grouted the tiles onto the one inch thick Wonderboard. Total cost $60.00.

    Dave
  12. 76brian

    76brian Feeling the Heat

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    Yup, same here. Much cheaper than buying one of those pre-made things. I still need to to some trim around the edges of mine but it turned out good with the help of a friend who does awesome tile work.

    Heavy as all hell though!
  13. mikhen

    mikhen Member

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    Mine cost me about $36. Used steel "unistrut" for the frame. Fireboard for the underlayment.
  14. jlord1169

    jlord1169 New Member

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    Thanks.. Yours is alot beafer. Do you think I used enough fire protection ? Good luck with your project
  15. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Hi jlord

    Yours should be fine.
  16. jlord1169

    jlord1169 New Member

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    Thanks Don. This is my first stove so I don't what to make any mistakes that could make me homeless.
  17. CTguy9230

    CTguy9230 Feeling the Heat

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    i built my own hearth as well...

    used 1/2 inch plywood with 1/4 inch backer board screwed to it
    then went with 6 by 6 ceramic tile

    for a first time tile job i'd say it came out pretty decent and a heck of
    alot cheaper then store bought
  18. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Hello

    Well it was 50 out today and a great day for hearth building!

    Since I finished the electrical in the new shed, I put it to the test!
    I had my compressor charging, a 1500 watt quartz heater going and started up my sliding mitre saw and table saw all on one cirduit!! The compressor charging slowed and I could hear the difference but the breaker did not quit!

    So to be more perfect I probably should plug the compressor into the 2nd shed circuit and I will be all set!!!

    Anyway, I went to the HD store to get an 8' stick of 2x2 popular wood like I used in the other hearth and no more. I finally went to the luber store and he explained that noone carries that length anymore because the wood is no longer being dried properly and curls up and is thrown out. In otherwords they lose money!!!!sd

    So I was forced to by the darker and much shorter cedar 2x2 in 1 - 4' and 2 - 3' lengths to go around the hearth to create my overhang for the rope lighting. See below see what I call the new "Buster Brown Collar" !!!

    Attached Files:

  19. Xena

    Xena Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for sharing Don. Looks like a fun project.
    Went to 58F here today. I was outside in a t shirt
    washing my windows.
  20. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Thanks Xena

    Yes a fun project to provide a little wood pellet heat in the Shed/Workshop. :)
  21. Wood Nugget

    Wood Nugget Member

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    Hello Don,
    I think the cedar will provide for some nice aroma. Can't wait to see the new rope lighting set up. I hope you dedicated an individual circuit for it!
  22. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Really do not thing I need another circuit, but I did set up an outlet for it. The top of the duplex is on the inside light switch. Should make it easy to turn on. :)

    Ran out of Daylight again to cut the cement board, but with power there is light!!

    Also got the bottom trim board on.
    Now I need to cover the ceder with the last 1x4 trim board I just picked up.
    See pics below.

    Attached Files:

  23. DirtyDave

    DirtyDave Feeling the Heat

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    I just used the double hardie backer and tile left over from the bathroom. Our tile never gets hot, so I have never gave it another thought. a zero clearance fireplace is closer and to flooring and of you go under your house after a few hours of running it and pull back the insulation and feel, its nice and warm under that zero clearance stove.

    You project looks very nice and well inspired also
  24. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Thanks Dave
    I put the top trim board on today and picked up some nice slate tiles that I can install. I just need a warm dry spot to do it!! The weather for tomorrow does not look good!!
  25. bcb1

    bcb1 Member

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    Nice project!

    After finding out back in 2004 how much pre-made tile hearths from the dealer cost -- $275 way back then -- I decided that even though I had no tile experience, it couldn't be that hard to do one. And it sure as heck wouldn't cost me $275 in materials!

    Turns out I was right. I made mine with 3/4" industrial grade particle board so it wouldn't warp, then used 1/4" cement board over that. I used 12x12 ceramic tiles from Lowes that cost about $1 each. The only mistake I made was buying one of those cheapie tile cutters, I couldn't get nice, clean cuts with it. I ended up taking the cheap tile cutter back and just paying Lowes the .25 cents per cut to go ahead and cut the tiles for me! I only had about 8 pieces to cut, so the $2.00 it cost me was much cheaper than buying a tile saw for $99.

    It really turned out great. I used solid oak edging for the trim, and it actually looks much nicer than any of the ready-made tile boards that my dealer was selling. I think I had about $60 in it by the time it was finished, plus it was kinda fun to build. Not so fun to lug up the basement steps though, that sucker is HEAVY!

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