Burning olive pit in pellet boiler

DOOM_NX Posted By DOOM_NX, Jul 23, 2013 at 5:55 AM

  1. DOOM_NX

    DOOM_NX
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 23, 2013
    12
    2
    Loc:
    Greece
    Hello, gentlemen! It's my first time writing, but I've been reading this forum for a long time and I have to admit that... this site rocks!

    A friend of mine just had an idea. Instead of burning wood pellets in his wood pellet burner, he is considering uncrushed olive pits (yes, oil NOT removed). Well, they may have a higher heating value, but all this oil can't be good for the boiler, can it?

    Can anybody shed some light into this matter?

    Thank you very much in advance.
     
  2. skfire

    skfire
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 15, 2010
    372
    114
    Loc:
    NEPA
    :)
    yes.olive pits have been a fuel in Greek stoves for a long time. As mentioned, dry is key. Keeping a vat full by the stove does the trick. Now quantity of pits....and boiler use?....maybe if one owns a dinner or two..._g
     
  3. skfire

    skfire
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 15, 2010
    372
    114
    Loc:
    NEPA
    that was the joke about the diner.o_O.but we grew up by an olive grove, so we ate plenty....grandpa always collected the pits from the whole family and burned them along with the dead branches and frees
     
  4. heaterman

    heaterman
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 16, 2007
    3,355
    622
    Loc:
    Falmouth, Michigan
    One thing to be aware of with all kinds of pits, shells, corn etc. is that they all contain more "stuff" than pure wood pellets do.
    Wood pellets are cellulose and as such they are about 100% carbon. Good burnable stuff, consistent, clean etc.

    When you get into the fruit pit realm you introduce things like sucrose and other things that can effect combustion for one thing and really change the composition of the combustion byproducts and flue gas for another.
    With pits and nuts, one of the things you'll get into is elevated levels of acid as a by product of combustion. Usually this is something you want to avoid in a burner of any type. Another thing is the oil or pitch content which introduces hydro carbons into the mix instead of pure carbon like a cellulose pellet. Hydrocarbons require a higher flame temp to burn cleanly than a pure carbon product so depending on the burner design and control, this can create problems for you in terms of ash buildup, cleaning intervals and excess wear and tear on the combustion chamber and HX.

    Just food for thought...........
     
    Fred61 likes this.
  5. Fred61

    Fred61
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 26, 2008
    2,018
    386
    Loc:
    Southeastern Vt.
    I like that. Took a minute to digest it.
    Also some produce contains sugar, especially corn. It will caramelize all the working parts of the interior of your unit.
     
  6. Bob Rohr

    Bob Rohr
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 9, 2008
    1,050
    159
    Loc:
    SW Missouri

    Grape seeds also are turned into a fuel source up in Washington state. http://www.goodfruit.com/from-pomace-to-pellets/

    Pretty much and fruit pit or seed if converted into fuel or pellets in Europe.
     

Share This Page