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burnt 'fleece' on stove..help...

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by mking7, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. mking7

    mking7 Burning Hunk

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    We have a VC 2550 Encore. Last night my wife was coming to bed and for some reason paused over the stove holding a fleece blanket she puts in her dog's bed (she says she was warming it up).....anyway, parts of it melted to the stove top. Anyone have any idea how to get it off without ruining the stove? I tried some 3M adhesive remover in an aerosol can that I have but it did nothing. I could scrape it but don't want to scar the finish on the stove. Any ideas?

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  2. ecocavalier02

    ecocavalier02 Minister of Fire

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    is there a lot still on the stove. otherwise i think you could probably make a hot fire and scrape it off.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Sounds like synthetic fleece and not wool. If so it may require a plastic solvent like acetone. But be careful and try a small area first. It will probably take off the paint as well. Watch the fumes when working with this stuff and wear rubber gloves.
  4. mking7

    mking7 Burning Hunk

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    It was definitely synthetic...I basically have plastic melted on the top of my stove...I assume the 3M Adhesive Remover would do whatever acetone would do but who knows.....Ug, this sucks. We just bought the house a year and a few months ago and weren't planning to keep the stove it had but I hate for things to not be right.....ug...
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I'd vote for the acetone too but might have to finish with some very fine steel wool. Fine like 000 or 0000.
  6. vixster

    vixster Member

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    You may want to do a search. I vaguely remember this being discussed in the past. If not fleece, it was something else that melted to the box.
  7. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee Minister of Fire

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    I'm afraid acetone won't cut it. Fleece is made from polyester (recycled soda & water bottles). From what I've been able to find, methylene chloride (the active ingredient in solvent based paint strippers) is the stuff to use. Of course, it is paint stripper, so unless your stove is enameled, it will strip the finish too.
  8. maverick06

    maverick06 Minister of Fire

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    regardless of what removes fleece, its melted, drastically changed the chemistry..... might remove it... might not depending on how burnt it is.... start with the solvent (I have had good luck with goo off, failing that, try acetone). if those dont work, then its mechanical means. you can buy plastic razor blades pep boys might have them, amazon does (apparently I cant post a link, search for "plastic razor blade" the one with best reviews was : Permatex 80189 Pro Scraper Plastic Scraper )

    I have had great luck using a regular razor blade if you are very very careful, (super glue off of wood, silicon adhesive off wood, super glue off of my freezer after it glued shut....)

    DONT BURN THE FIREPLACE until you remove it, I suspect it will only make it worse...
  9. tfdchief

    tfdchief Minister of Fire

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    Might be obvious, but make sure the stove is COLD when you do it.
  10. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    Likely PET , recycled soda bottles.
    Acetone might craze the surface at best , methylene chloride or chloroform used to solvent weld might soften it but that would likely be like peeling a thousand layer onion.

    If it melted on the stove it likely burned, won't soften again nor likely will a solvent soften it.

    iirc, it melts at 425/450 and at 500 in the air it burns and turns black.


    I'd work at it from the edges with a razor blade.

    Wouldn't surprise me if it burnt its pretty much bonded to the paint.

    porcelain enamel ?
  11. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

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    I'd start with WD-40. It dissolves a lot of things I wouldn't have guessed. If it doesn't work, you're not out anything.
  12. thenorth

    thenorth New Member

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    heat the fire box up, to approx 95f............. spray with wd40/, then scrape off with a plastic razor, then polish clean with wet paper towel....
    thats just 2c worth..............k
  13. Dieselbreath

    Dieselbreath Member

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    I had the imprint of a tennis shoe on my glass and after trying unsuccesfully to scrape it off I just used the stove and eventually it burnt completely off. Don't know if your stove top will get hot enough though.
  14. firebroad

    firebroad Minister of Fire

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    If your wife has nail polish remover (acetone), use that. It will take it off.
  15. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    What if you get the stove good and warm, and then take a propane torch to the burnt material on the stove? Might be able to get it to bubble back up and scrape it off gently / easier? Or it might stink for a bit but may burn it off? Just thinking here.

    pen
  16. Bocefus78

    Bocefus78 Minister of Fire

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    agree with pen, i'd be burning it off before I went the chem route
  17. rustynut

    rustynut Feeling the Heat

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    mking7,
    I'm think that if this were my stove and i didn't want to damage the finish
    in an area that shows i might duplicate the problem in an area that doesn't
    show, maybe on the back side, and find my answer in a less obvious location.
    Then proceed to the initial problem. This might save from damaging the finish
    where you see everyday ?
    rn
  18. cricketfarmer

    cricketfarmer New Member

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    I don't think I would try burning any plastic inside my house. They give off some nasty, toxic fumes.
  19. Wade A.

    Wade A. Feeling the Heat

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    Been there. I had been warming the kids shirts before they put them on in the morning to go to school....they loved it. I did it typically when the stove was warming up. One morning I threw on a too-hot stove a synthetic shirt. Really, it was stupid, and it melted to the top more or less instantly. Mine is an enamel finish, and I figured it wouldn't hurt to leave it awhile. Next time the stove got really hot I swiped it off with a damp rag. Repeat if necessary.
  20. Creature

    Creature Member

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    My girlfriend looked at me with "that look" when I told her no synthetics on or too near the stove (she likes to warm her jamies and dry her clothes when they're wet). Maybe I should just send her this post rather than explaining the details.

    Anyway, I'd leave it providing it isn't enough volume of material to offgas anything (too) toxic. It'll slowly remove itself.
  21. Wade A.

    Wade A. Feeling the Heat

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    Yeah, I knew way better than to do that on a stove that hot with even a cotton shirt, which probably would have scorched too. Like a lot of folks, I've gotten complacent about wearing synthetic shirts, like Under Armour, etc. If you ever get exposed to an accidental fire wearing one of those, your skin and that shirt will become "one." Horrifying to think about.

    It also pays to remind the kids not to huddle too close to the stove. Even though all kids' jammies should have flame retardants in them, you don't want to ever have to test that. Plus, I'm less than convinced that the U.S. Products Safety Commission has any clue about what is, or isn't, in the products we import. Really, it is every man for himself anymore.
  22. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    +1

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