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Busted Stihl worth fixing?

Post in 'The Gear' started by Jon1270, Jul 15, 2013.

  1. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    I'm on the fence about a possible find. Someone about 45 minutes away is unloading an 066 with a broken crankshaft. The person advertising it is a person of few words and fewer pictures, and he's taking offers instead of setting a price. In the single low-res cellphone pic it almost looks like it sat in direct sunlight for a few years; it's not scraped up badly, but there's paint missing and the orange plastic has practically turned brown.

    Given what I imagine is involved in the fix -- new crankshaft, bearings, seals, gaskets... and what about the piece of the crank that's probably busted off in the flywheel? -- is a saw in this condition even worth fixing, or does it make more sense for someone (not me) to part it out?

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  2. You've got the tools, might as well put them to use.

    Stihl's are always worth fixing. Husqvarna, not so much ;)

    For the right price it's worth fixing. But you could have well over $200 worth of parts into it though. More if it needs a P&C
  3. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    I had the same thought, but it really comes down to the price of the saw and the parts. Looking at ebay, it seems that saw could maybe be parted out and sold separately for more than the fixed saw would be worth, which makes me doubt that any price I can offer would make sense for the seller.
  4. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    parts of anything will always be more than the group of parts as one. Reason is that you have to dissasemble it and then sell each part. This is why you can part a car out and make more money than selling the whole thing as acrap steel. This is why junkyards are profitable.
  5. Offer him $50 and go from there.

    The early 066's had a metal flywheel known for breaking the crank. They switched to a poly flywheel... If all it needs is the crank you might make out pretty good. If you part it out the cylinder is worth good money.
  6. Stihl and others manufacturers keep the price of parts high so that you will just buy a new saw. Probably more profitable for them.

    There are few ebay sellers that buy brand new saws just to part them out.
  7. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    Interestingly, the guy I bought the tools from last week showed me a Rotary Corp. catalog that was his primary source for aftermarket replacement parts. Even though rotary doesn't make new saws, the parts were still awfully expensive compared to the aftermarket parts I see on eBay, or even at Baileys.
  8. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    Are they interchangeable?
  9. No, don't think so. But the early 066's have a better reputation. I just sold my late model poly flywheel 660 in favor of a metal flywheel early 066 magnum.
  10. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Make him an offer. It's up to him as far as whether it makes sense or not. You could get lucky.

    As far as that Rotary catalog goes, were you looking at the list prices? Especially with the aftermarket stuff, the actual cost is often a far cry from what the "list" price is.

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