1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Buy the best and only cry once?

Post in 'The Gear' started by Hills Hoard, Mar 25, 2013.

  1. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Loc:
    Indiana
    A Dremel would fail miserably on my 1/4" thick high carbon blades. I wouldn't hold out much hope, but worth a shot.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    I
    I commute about 60 miles (one way) to work and i get about 34-36 mpg using all Royal Purple synthetics (trans, power steering, oil, etc). They are 2011 (bought both same day) Both are SES w/ sync. Had i known they were gonna redesign the body, I would have waited. But its a good car and gets the job done.
  3. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Loc:
    Indiana
    We had a couple 72" Dixies'...one gas and one diesel and they could knock out flat areas in no time. My yard is "flat" but it is far from "even" so I decided to go with a 60"...I also have a few tight areas that 72" is too large for.

    I have a Bad Boy. I know they aren't exactly name brand machines, but they are well built with some quality components (Parker, Hydrogear, Kawasaki). So far, all good.
    DexterDay likes this.
  4. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,011
    Loc:
    West Friendship, Maryland
    lol - I saw that Tormek grinder on the Sears website and thought it was a tape dispenser. Did not even bother to click on it. That thing looks awesome for sharpening blades, knives, etc. If I remember correctly, it was a little pricey though. Going to add it to my wish list.
  5. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Loc:
    Indiana
    I can buy a LOT of blades for the price of a Tormek. That's one of those thing that, while it looks top of the line and I would use it, I would rather not have that much $ tied up in a tool.
  6. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,011
    Loc:
    West Friendship, Maryland
    Yeah, $470 for the 8" stone and $800 for the 10" stone. Me, I am debating buying one after next tax season. Would probably go with the 8" stone. Don't know why I would ever need the 10" one.

    I think blades for my mower are around $80 a set, so it would take 8 sets of blades before the Tormek would pay for itself. I can probably find a lot of other things to sharpen though. It would be nice for the hatchets and ax, not to mention wood chisels, etc.
  7. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Loc:
    Indiana
    I'll stick with my $14.99 HF angle grinder and get my money back on 1/2 of the first blade.
    DexterDay likes this.
  8. gmule

    gmule Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    Messages:
    452
    Loc:
    Conifer Colorado
    To me tools are money. Every time I fix something I am paying myself back for the purchase.
    There are a few tools that I think quality matters. Multi meters, torque wrenches, drill motors, measuring equipment like calipers and dial indicators and tools that I am likely to use at least once a week. A pro level saw will save your body and time.
    If I can save some cash by buying a tool that is made for different companies I can go that route too. I'll use my Muryama / Dolmar/ Makita saw as an example.
  9. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    My Dixie Dealer also sells Bad Boys and Ferris. All of them are very nice machines :)

    If i got the Bad Boy, I would have to get the Spoiler for the back ;) It just looks sweet with it on there.

  10. I have the t-7. Prices have gone up a bit since I bought. But it is what I consider a lifetime tool. And something my son will probably have for his lifetime as well. There are cheaper ways to put a good edge on a blade. But for someone that doesn't have a lot of time or patience to learn hand sharpening the tormek is the way to go. I don't really need to be able to slice paper with my hatchet. But I can now ;)

    I work with some hacks that use a belt sander to sharpen a chisel. Should have seen them when I showed them what a sharp chisel can do. And as a bonus it's a crossover tool -- the wife is very happy with sharp knives. I think grizzly sells one now that is basically a copy of the tormek but the reviews haven't been great. And the quality of the stone is questionable.
  11. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    $700+ blade grinders seem like overkill but I love mine (would have to go look again to remember the name.... ;lol) and it saves me a load of time, which for me, is money. But if it's not handy, the vise/angle grinder would be my next choice. I can do nice work with that setup. ;)

    Dex, spoiler, really? ;sick ;)
  12. OldLumberKid

    OldLumberKid Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Messages:
    280
    Loc:
    Sandyland
    I don't partake anywhere near as much as I used to, so I am out of touch with what's good right now, but all of the following can be counted on as good representative drams.

    Well for a place to start it's hard to go wrong with Macallan 12, and branch out from there. It's tons of quality and rich flavor of whiskey aged in old sherry casks, for the buck it tastes like something way more expensive than it is— way beyond the vapid Glenfiddichs and and their ilk.

    Macallan also tends to stay pretty consistent from year to year.

    The regular original Glenmorangie is another good starting point and good value. Clynelish 14 is another favorite that's great value, but a little hard to find. I liked Highland Park a lot (and Orkeny whisky), but it's gotten really expensive recently and the 12 yr-old that used to be good value was all sold out and it's now into vintages I haven't tasted, so could not say.

    Oban is another great tasting single malt, but for some reason it's the only one that gives me headaches with even a small amount. Pity cos I liked that one a lot.

    My personal favorite is Royal Lochnagar, but dadgum difficult to find on this side of the pond.

    These whiskies are much like good quality saws Dolmar, Husky, Jonsered, Stihl — but the saws and whisky should never ever be mixed, of course.
    Jack Fate and DexterDay like this.
  13. OldLumberKid

    OldLumberKid Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Messages:
    280
    Loc:
    Sandyland
    Looks like a mighty fine stable of horses there, just waiting for their turn.
  14. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,011
    Loc:
    West Friendship, Maryland
    Thanks. Just waiting till April 16th so I can start riding them again and start running the saws too. This work stuff is for the birds.
    OldLumberKid likes this.
  15. Jack Fate

    Jack Fate Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2013
    Messages:
    399
    Loc:
    Northwest Ohio


    Thanks was going in the Glenfiddichs 12 direction & still can do a shot at a place I found. But will seek out your recommends for bottle

    Thank you & yes drinkin' & saws don't mix

    Stackin' might tho
  16. Jack Fate

    Jack Fate Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2013
    Messages:
    399
    Loc:
    Northwest Ohio
    P1020043.jpg
    gmule likes this.
  17. Jack Fate

    Jack Fate Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2013
    Messages:
    399
    Loc:
    Northwest Ohio
    couldn't write anything with pic

    My favorite of the last 50 yrs of what I've owned

    Phil Wood hubs & BB ,magura hyd rim brakes & some japan co that I use to likes xtr drive line, rims Australia & yes Virginia an a American frame

    nitto racks (japan) Berthude bags( France) may be misspelled & BAR END SHIFFTERS .

    THEY DON'T MAK'EM LIKE THIS ANY MORE

    Cheers

    Does anyone understand this ?

    And just noticed this is not Inglenook

    blaming it on fabsroman ;em
  18. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,011
    Loc:
    West Friendship, Maryland
    lol - I understand it.

    Colnago Cristallo - pretty much 100% Italian except the DT-Swiss spokes, Look French pedals, and the Tufo tires.
    RBR Cristallo.jpg


    Mino Denti - 100% Italian except the Look French pedals, chain, rear Suntour freewheel, and DT Swiss spokes. The saddle has since been changed for a Fizik.
    RBR Denti.JPG


    C50 - again pretty much 100% Italian except the Look French pedals, DT- Swiss spokes, tires, Zipp rims made in America, ZEro-G brakes made in America, and hubs made in Germany. With that said, I have some Italian components waiting to be built into a wheelset. The stem has also been cut down since this pic.

    RBR1.JPG
    gmule likes this.
  19. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    I have had a few cheap saws over the years and to be honest if you take care of them they will last. My 46cc poulan was the last chepo and it held up for a long time. It cost 129 bucks and went for almost five years before I bought a used stihl from Amateur Cutter on the forum. A good buddy took the old poulan and fixed it up again and its still cutting albeit slowly these days. I put that poulan through hell and back too ! It was never meant to take the cut time I gave it. It's all about the up keep of equtment.

    Pete
    Hills Hoard likes this.
  20. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,011
    Loc:
    West Friendship, Maryland
    Yeah, upkeep matters, but I think you just proved that the lower end saws just do not do what the upper end ones do, and definitely not as nicely/smoothly. You had the saw for 5 years before it had to be "fixed up". If I have to "fix up" my MS261 or MS660 in 5 years and it is cutting a lot slower than it used to, that will be a travesty.

    My dad used a couple McCullochs for around 10 years, but they were nowhere near as nice to cut with as my current saws. My dad is currently using a 16" Craftsman and after using my saws all he does is continue to look at the Stihl lineup in the ads and at the dealer. Finally got him to tell me what he would like and it is a MS251. Going to get that for him for his birthday. Granted, it isn't a MS261, but it will do just fine for his needs. It will be pleasant to use it AND it will pretty much last him forever.
  21. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    I can understand the attraction to a high end saw. I am by no means a Stihl fanatic however I do for the most art like my super 036. My actual love affair is and so far has remained Echo they are some bad mothers. My CS-310 has only needed an oil filter in the last 6 years and runs like the day it was new. I like the feel of Echo in my hands too. All that said the Poulan cut for 2 homes for 4 of those years I was not kidding when I said I put it through hell. For $129 and its still runs it was worth every penny to me. Weather I spend $129 every 5 years or $500 every 15 the price is close to the same. Its a matter of perspective I suppose ! If your cutting 3 cord a year for your home its really not necessary to have a fancy saw ( it is nice though ! ) Personally I like a good powerful saw in my hands but if money is a problem at the time then cheapo it is.

    Pete
  22. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,011
    Loc:
    West Friendship, Maryland
    No need to have a chainsaw at all for 3 cords. Do it like Lincoln, with an ax. You could also use a one man saw. Saw that on a Stihl timbersports event the other day.

    The point I am trying to make is that I would rather cut with a pro level saw that last 15+ years than a disposable $150 saw that just SUCKS compared to the pro saw. If the two were to have the same life span, then I would have to think twice about the disposable saw at 1/3 the cost. My experience has been that my dad goes through cheap saws left and right and spends more time resolving issues with them toward the end of their useful life than he does cutting wood. The headache just isn't worth it for me. I have also run the MS290, which has the same power as my MS261 but weighs about 2 pounds more, is bulkier, and feels like a brick. Yeah,. I am happy I spent the extra $170 for my MS261 over the MS290 even if both would last the same number of years and cut the same amount of wood.
    mikefrommaine likes this.
  23. OldLumberKid

    OldLumberKid Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Messages:
    280
    Loc:
    Sandyland
    Nice tandem — I have no idea if Cannondale makes, but you can still get all the artisan quality panniers, and I'm pretty sure Magura is still making great hydraulics.

    I built my latest road bike in the basement from Campy, plus a frame and parts I'd spec'd out
    and the wheels Custom DT Swiss 1.1 by Mike Garcia at Odds and Endos. Phil Wood was not in the budget, Garcia's Speedcific hubs are good.

    I'm not sure whose chain I like better Campagnolo Chorus or Stihl — they both look good lubed up, but the Stihl chain stays a lot cleaner longer that's for sure. One cuts wood, and I guess on a bike it's gonna make short work of your calves ;)

    P.S. I'm gonna experiment — on an MTB with 3.5 parts OMS and 1 part Stihl bar oil — believe it or not it's secret sauce for some. The Road bike, though, gets Park CL-1.



    FRAME/FORK
    Frame: Leader 780-R 56cm; UAL Aluminum/Carbon Seatstay
    Fork: Easton EC90 SLX CNT Carbon
    Headset: Cane Creek IS series
    Seatpost/Collar: Leader Bike*
    Forkplug/Headset Cap: Leader Bike Carbon expanding plug.
    Cable adjusters: Leader Bike

    DRIVETRAIN
    Crank: Campagnolo 2008 Compact Carbon Centaur 54-30, 165 mm
    Cassette: Campagnolo Centaur 13-29
    Shifters: Campagnolo 2007 Chorus
    Chain: Campagnolo Chorus
    BB: Campagnolo Record
    Rear Derailleur: Campagnolo 2008 Centaur Medium
    Front Der: Campagnolo 2008 Centaur
    Cable guide under frame: Leader (Campy provided not used)
    Cables/housings: Campagnolo
    Pedals: Crank Bros Quattro / Crank Bros 5050*

    WHEELS
    DT Swiss 1.1 Rims, 28h front, 32h rear / Speedcific Campagnolo compat. Hubs (built by Mike Garcia--Odds and Endos)
    Rear: 32-hole AE15/14 Black Brass nipples non-rive side/Sliver Brass on drive side
    Front: 28-hole AE15 Aluminum nipples
    Tires: Serfas Seca RS Folding 23mm
    Tubes: Specialized (looked heavy duty long stem)

    COCKPIT
    Handlebar: FSA Wing Pro Aluminum (Short & Shallow)
    Tape/wrap: Aztec/Delta Vibe Wrap*
    Stem: Bontrager Race Lite 40 degree 4 bolt (for herniated neck discs C5-6-7)
    Saddle: Koobi Enduro PRS
    Mirror: for herniated neck discs C5-6-7 rear view = The Italian Road Bike Mirror
    Waterbottle cage: Whatever was lying around in the MTB bag.

    * Crank Bros 5050 pedals used during ongoing test riding and adjustment phase.
  24. geoff1969

    geoff1969 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
    Messages:
    76
    Loc:
    australia
    had a mcculloch 4218 = dead now lasted a few years doing light work but piston is now craped itself , the single ring cracked in 2 and scored the bore / pot .
  25. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    That would be a sweet mod for one of you woodburner/cyclist types. Build a bike chain using chainsaw chain tie-straps and cutter links. Dull ones of course. ;)

Share This Page