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Calling all plumbers- adding bathroom in basement

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by bjorn773, Nov 21, 2007.

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  1. bjorn773

    bjorn773 Member

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    Loc:
    Rockford, Illinois
    I am looking into adding a bathroom in my basement. The idea of busting up the concrete to add the necessary plumbing will be expensive no doubt. I've been looking into a macerating toilet system. It has a grinder/pump assembly that sits on the floor behind the toilet that will eject up to 18 feet vertical I believe. I am trying to get ahold of my local inspector to see if code allows the use of this system. My home is hooked to city sewer which runs under the basement floor. I believe the dwv pipe to be 4 inch, which I believe should handle the additional flow necessary. My home presently has only one bathroom on the first floor. Has anyone installed one of these? Any info/insight will be greatly appreciated.

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  2. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    I have done basement rooms and I find this the most economical way to do a bathroom if I can get to the sewer pipe easily, not only that but the sink can also be plumbed to the pump and possibly a shower
  3. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    So the gravity sewer is already in the floor and you just don't want to run the pipe? I've cut and then busted out concrete slabs for pipe runs and find the job to be very messy but otherwise not too technical. If you have enough fall for the system to flow I would really really prefer the gravity method for the sake of dependability. Of course, if the existing sewer pipe was too high in elevation then a pump would be the only option.
  4. bjorn773

    bjorn773 Member

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    Loc:
    Rockford, Illinois
    The stack from upstairs is exposed and within a few feet of where I'd want the bathroom. I have no idea how deep the sewer is below the floor. I tried to get ahold of my local inspector today and got voicemail four times. My past experience with inspectors has not left a pleasant taste in my mouth. Elk, have you ever had any issues mechanically with these systems? It says it discharges thru a 3/4 inch pipe... it must really grind the s&*t up.
  5. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    If its mechanical, its going to eventually break.

    I don't know the height of your basement, but would it be possible to build an elevated floor for the bathroom, hide your plumbing underneath, and tie into the close by stack, while maintaining adequate headroom?
  6. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    I have a similar situation. I busted out about 7 linear feet of concrete in my basement to add a floor drain to the utility room, and relocate some plumbing for a bathroom. Bought a diamond blade for my circular saw ($25), cut two lines about 1/4-3/8" deep to outline the trenches and busted out the center with a sledge hammer. Came in with a 4" angle grinder to cut the wire mesh. Laid the pipe and poured new concrete from the quickcrete bags ($30). Somewhat labor intensive, but nothing really technical or tedious.

    Did a similar job for my brother, except he had about 8 feet of 6" slab to get through, so we rented a concrete saw and a jackhammer for a couple hours. The pro tools definitely made it easier. Total cost of the rentals was $150ish IIRC. I don't know how much the pumping toilet costs, but if you only have a few feet of concrete to get through, it would probably be cheaper to just bust it up.
  7. lolita

    lolita Guest

  8. saichele

    saichele Minister of Fire

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    My parents and Bro-in-law have the lift pumps, and they do go bad. More often than you think. And when they do, it's nasty. Also, they require power. That's a drawback IMHO.

    Steve
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