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Can anyone identify this wood stove for me.

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by graywoulf, Dec 2, 2011.

  1. graywoulf

    graywoulf New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2011
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    Western NC
    Hi to all,

    I have been given this wood heater but I do not know anything about it.
    Can anyone identify this wood stove for me as far as who makes it or even
    possibly a model number. It is being used as an fireplace insert righ now
    but I would like to use it a a free standing wood heater in my doublewide
    mobile if at all possible.

    Thanks for any and all help and advice with this.

    Attached Files:

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  2. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

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    Salisbury, MD
    The S on front makes me think Schrader, but most of them do not look like this. This is an odd one. Does it have any UL tags on the back or any other identifying marks on it?
  3. graywoulf

    graywoulf New Member

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    Nov 20, 2011
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    Loc:
    Western NC
    I have not had a chance to see any more than what is in the picture you see. I do know it is an early 70's model heater which might explain the lack of information available on it. I am mainly interested in finding out who the manufacturer is though.
  4. CamFan

    CamFan Member

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    you will not want to put it in a mobil home if you can not add an outside air supply. Old stoves that was not available to my knowledge. the reason is a mobil home is generally so tight that the stove can burn up all the oxygen in it. Be careful
  5. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    NE PA
    That's correct graywoulf, the code states "Combustion must be in direct communication with the atmosphere" to prevent using any indoor air. NFPA Codes also require any appliance to be "certified for use" when installed in HUD or mobile home housing. If it was listed for use in factory built homes it would have a certification tag on it. Since space is limited, certified appliances usually have clearance reduction shields as well. Propane fired appliances also must have an outside source of oxygen. Furnaces and wood stoves that are mobile home approved have built in outdoor air intakes or intake air kits UL listed with the stove. Stove tops are exempt since they are manually controlled, and ovens are limited in BTU to prevent excessive oxygen consumption. There are listing certifications "for use in" Residential, Commercial, Recreational Vehicles, and Marine as well. So they aren't picking on factory built homes.
    There was a certified Fisher Goldilocks made for double-wides with an 8 inch outlet. Built just like the 6 inch Goldilocks, this larger size is the stove you need.

    Man, I would have made a good Fisher Salesman.

    Attached Files:

  6. Redbear86

    Redbear86 Member

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    SE Idaho
    Coaly/ camfan, can the pedestal goldilocks be use with legs instead of the pedestal, i assume the air intake would be exposed but besides that could one make it work? Is the air intake an Outside Air Kit OAK, i know it isn't fueling a secoundary burn? Also i've read that OAK systems are ideally not installed below ground level, why is that and is there anyway to make one work below ground level? I feel like i'm still asking way too many questions for having been part of this website so long! Thanks for all the help
  7. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    NE PA
    All appliances that are "listed for use" can not be modified and must be installed as manufacturer instructions. Part of the UL testing is floor protection, or downward radiation. Codes are different for legs 2 to 6" in height, and 6" to 14". The pedestal raises the stove bottom the correct height to pass with the floor protector that came with the stove. This airflow keeps the pedestal cold. There is also an ash clean out door on the bottom of the stove that wouldn't open if it were close to the floor. All Fishers certified for factory built housing have an air inlet that installs through the floor to draw air from under the home. They have a rodent screen on the end as well. The intake and exhaust system was supplied by Dura-Vent.
    Better to learn by asking than by doing.

    There is a cut away view that shows the air intake in the Goldilocks manual. I can send you one in pdf format with a request to bearstoves@verizon.net.

    Secondary burn wasn't invented until after most manufacturers went out of business due to not being able to pass the new EPA smoke regulations that became far stricter in 1988.
  8. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    Averill Park, NY, on Burden Lake II...
    If you look at the corners on the bottom of the stove, you'll see another
    "mobile" home requirement...Holes to mount it securely to the floor.
  9. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, that's not only for taking it down the road, it's due to moving the stove closer to the wall loading it. The reduced clearance of 12 inches is easy to change on the brick pad that came with the stove. It's more slippery than real masonry. Instead of legs bearing the weight on very little square area, the large square area of the steel plate base is like a sled and moves easily.

    Here's the 4 foot square template that shows where to cut carpet, floor intake hole, and bolt 'er down. I'll drag out the installation kit for one and get pictures some day. It's a 4 foot square piece of corrugated steel with simulated brick pad that sits on top of it. An angle iron frame closes in the open air channel sides.

    Attached Files:

  10. graywoulf

    graywoulf New Member

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    Western NC
    To all who have replied and have given their valuable advice I thank you all. I have learned a lot from this one post. Even though this wood heater as old as it is is being offered to me for free I am going to have to probably put it to use in my workshop which is a separate building from my house and will probably benefit more from the heater since it is definitely not an air tight structure. this will also give me a way to use my scraps as well. Thanks again for the information!

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