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can I make a grate for my stove?

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Energy-mate, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. Energy-mate

    Energy-mate New Member

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    I have an Energy-mate wood furnace and from what I have found they are no longer in business. The cast iron grate has just about had it so I need a new one.
    My question is how can I make this so it will stand up to the heat and not just warp and burn up? The actual fabrication isn't the problem I just don't know what to make it out of. The outside edges of the grate hold my fire brick in place so it has to stay put once it's in there.
    Hopefully someone here can point me in the right direction on this.

    Thanks

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  2. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Is this something that you can build, then install or does it need to be built inside the unit. A current pic would sure help.
  3. peakbagger

    peakbagger Minister of Fire

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    I had a friend build a grate for my Burham boiler 10 years ago and its like new, its a bottom feed air system so combustion air blows up through it. H emade it out of 1x1 square stock.
    ScotO and Dune like this.
  4. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    High carbon steel (but fairly large dimension, like peakbagger was posting about). 400 series stainless. Cast Iron are all good choices. Cast being the most difficult unless you have a forge. Personally I would go with large dimension steel and just commit myself to replacing it every 20 years. Its the most available and easiest to work with in an average shop.
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  5. Energy-mate

    Energy-mate New Member

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    Thanks for the input the grate is removable and is approximately 8x27. The edges are at an angle and resting on the fire brick. The best I could do for a picture would be one inside the stove because I'm afraid if I remove it again it will fall apart. It has been welded back together several times and now it's warped to the point it won't hold the bricks in properly. I don't have any way to work with cast iron but steel isn't a problem just what will last atleast a season?
  6. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

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    Ive seen grates made of stainless steel last, but do not let the ash build up to the grates. This causes extreme heat and warps and cracks them. I would look into a few old school furnaces and see if they use something comparable, or can be adapted. Here is a grate for an energy mate wood furnace, but at 213.00 ouch! Check with woodchuck, Yukon, energy king, charmaster, firecheif, etc. and see if they have something that will work.

    http://www.woodmanspartsplus.com/168800/products/Wood-Stove-Grate-25-12-x-7-12.html
  7. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    Welcome energy mate we have a place called Alro Steel near us and they sell all kinds of scraps cheap. i think they would ship it to you as well they may even be able to cut it all to the right sizes for you. http://www.alro.com/Locations/LocationsMain.aspx There may even be one near you.

    Pete
  8. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Plain old steel in the 3/4 x3/4" or 1" x 1" square stock. That will last for quite some time.
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  9. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I would think that a grate made of 1/2" rebar would last a few seasons.
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  10. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    If you can limp it through the season just remove it and make a copy from equal or slightly heavier mild steel. I am sure that is what is in there now and will last equally as long as the original. Just copy what is there.
  11. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    I'd be doing what the others said and make it out of either square stock or some rebar. heck, rebar is super cheap, and 3/4' rebar would last alot more than a season or two. Just make sure when you weld it together that the welder is turned up for good penetration, and I'd take a torch and preheat each weld area just prior to welding......that will make the welds stay together longer with all that expansion and contraction in the stove......
  12. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    ...Or get Bob or Dune to hammer weld them...;)
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  13. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    A little Borax and a lotta heat......then beat 'em together!!

    Forge welding is a dying art.......
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  14. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    You would need an aweful big forge and deft hand with the hammer to pound together a grate :) IMO I would just whip one out with the squirt welder and be done with it in an hour or so and repeat the process in 10yrs.

    Forge welding is cool though - almost like magic when you get it to stick!!
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  15. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    "squirt welder."

    ;lol;lol;lol
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  16. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    not to mention it can be dangerous.....we did some forge welding at my buddy's shop last year,when that borax starts to boil and you hammer it on the anvil, that molten slag flies everywhere!! Something to see, but you gotta watch as the sparks fly in all directions.....
    Had to watch for smoke along the walls for a while after we did the welding!!
  17. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    Mig Jags - but I knew you and Scotty would get it. Basically idiot proof.

    And yes it does suck when a big dollop of slag falls into the top of your boot or into your pocket!! :eek: I am so much more careful regarding PPE with the saw than I am around the fab shop. Ears and Eyes is my main concern there so burns are rather expected.
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  18. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    I always called them the "caulk gun" of welders.
  19. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    That REALLY made me laugh because here at work, we have a Boilermaker (welder) that cant weld worth chit, but he is an artist with a caulking gun.......we call it his cordless welder!!
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  20. denn

    denn Member

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    I made a couple, one was out of the flange of an H beam with 1/2" slots burned in. I let about 1 1/2" of the flange on.
    Used it 18 years an it looked like the day I put it in when I scraped the boiler.

    The other one I think was out of 3/4" steel plate with 1/2" slots.
    Still being used, 25 years

    If I was going to make another I may use 1" sq. stock with 1/2" thick 1" X 1" spacers welded every 3" or 4" apart.
    I'm shakey with a torch now.
  21. Energy-mate

    Energy-mate New Member

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    I ran across some 1" plate to try just need to cut the angle for the edges and burn some slots. I did decide to make a two piece grate so it won't be quite as heavy. Wish I had a friend with a waterjet or a plasma cutter then I could make it look professional.
  22. denn

    denn Member

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    If you drill 1/2" holes at each end of your slots that makes it easier to finish the slots with a torch.
    It takes a steady hand though, a straight edge helps.
    They could be machined with a rougher end mill after the 1/2" hole was drilled.

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