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CAN YA GUESS THESE BIG BOYS ??? TREE ID

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by WoodButcher80, Feb 4, 2009.

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  1. ISeeDeadBTUs

    ISeeDeadBTUs Guest

    Quaking aspen isn't a softwood . . . its a nuisance

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  2. `RyaN`

    `RyaN` New Member

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    I would say those are quakes or bigtooth aspens. AKA popples. Tulip/yellow poplar definitely have a different bark pattern. Tulip poplar is better burning and gives you a better price for saw timber. Aspen basically goes into the paper mills.

    But don't forget about lumbardy poplars and hybrid poplars both of which are junk trees! Similar to the apen to burn and use but named like the tulip! Of course if you would want to get rid of any confussion you could compar latin names ;) Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) Tulip Poplar (Lireodendron tulipifera)
  3. `RyaN`

    `RyaN` New Member

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    Delete Please dbl post!
  4. WoodButcher80

    WoodButcher80 Feeling the Heat

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    well well , WE HAVE A LATIN LAD HERE!
  5. `RyaN`

    `RyaN` New Member

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    2 degrees in forestry and 5 years of schooling I would hope I learned something out of it.
  6. karri0n

    karri0n New Member

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    So yer thinks'n yers better'n us wit yer fancy schoolsin an' such dere, eh?
  7. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    LOL

    I been in da forest when it been colder den 2 degrees and I made past grade 5 but I ain't talking Latin.
  8. `RyaN`

    `RyaN` New Member

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    Naw not better. Just enjoyed what I learned and proud. I am sure there is something you could teach me though still like starting a fire without smoke filling up yer house.
  9. jpl1nh

    jpl1nh Minister of Fire

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    While i wouldn't be laoding my stove full of it in a cold snap, I do burn a lot of it in all other types of weather. Have a big hunk of poplar in my stove right this minute. Poplars and aspen are all in the Latin genus populus. Tulip poplar is actually not a poplar at all but a magnolia, though poplar like, hence it's common name. Big tooth aspen is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Populus_grandidentata
  10. wally

    wally New Member

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    i say it's Populus tremuloides, rather than Liriodendron tulipifera.

    Populus grandidentatahas bark that looks slightly different.
  11. Birch Boy

    Birch Boy Member

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    Knocked a few of those down last winter, clearing some land for food plots. Wish that black poplar was good for burning we got lots.
    Went for saw logs, they use the cants on the rigs out west in the oil patch.

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  12. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Poplar is an often misidentified tree and I'm as guilty as the next guy. What I tend to call Black Poplar is not what the real "Populus nigra" is. Populus nigra is not native to North America.

    What is often referred to as Black Poplar is usually one of the varieties of Balsam Poplar.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balsam_poplar

    Balsam Poplar is also known as Balm of Gilead, or around here just "Bam tree".

    As for its uses, it is used to make paper and OSB and is sawed into skids. I've handled more than I care to remember of Poplar skids (mostly green) on pipeline construction jobs. I've also cut lots of Poplar trees to lay down in swamps to make roads for the pipe laying equipment.
  13. Birch Boy

    Birch Boy Member

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    Bam Tree.............. Never heard that one before but makes sense now that I know what black poplar really is.
    I guess we call it black poplar around here cause it grows along side white poplar on poorly drained land and looks much the same
    except that as it matures it turns kinda black. Also could be but I doubt it, in the early spring black bears climb those huge trees
    and eat the sticky buds. You can't believe how far out on a limb those buggers will go for a feed! Never tried them but those buds
    must be delicious for those bears to risk it all 40 and more feet out on a spindly branch.
    When we use black poplar to line a wet mucky road we call it corduroy. Black poplar is best suited because it's not much good in the stove
    and seems like the darn stuff never rots even though it's sitting there in a soup hole for years. Black poplar also makes beautiful rustic plaques
    for mounting fish and such on.

    Bam...............maybe black poplar ain't as useless as I thought!
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