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Carb adjustment Homelite 33 CC chain saw

Post in 'The Gear' started by Jerry_NJ, May 20, 2008.

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  1. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    I have owned a Homelite 14" chain saw for a number of years, the first one purchased in 1993. That first one came with a manual that gave guidance on adjusting the carb, including idle and hight speed jets.

    My newer one, purchased in about 2005, has been running poorly, lack of power, in fact it is hard to get it to run at full throttle. The manual for this newer saw notes the need to adjust the high speed jet as a possible fix, however, there is no information on where that is, and advises that the saw needs to be taken to the dealer for adjustment of the high speed jet.

    Looking at the saw I see two openings in the engine cover, just behind the pull rope handle. One marked "T" and an elongated hole marked "L" and "H". The "T" is clearly the idle speed or "Throttle" set. The other two are rather recessed and hard to see, but with good sunlight or flashlight one can see that inside the elongated hole are two small "nut" heads, perhaps 3/16" or a bit smaller and not much clearance around them, i.e., need a thin-wall socket. I figured this was just another attempt to thwart user adjustments. I stuck a small screw driver in and tried to rotate the "H" a bit, and succeeded ... the saw runs much, much better. The reason for this story? Well, is it possible to get a thin-wall socket or thin-wall nut driver for adjusting these adjustments? What is the size, my 3/16" nut driver looked about right, but the head was too thick to get in onto the adjustment nut.

    In the good old days, the owner's manual would tell what tool was needed. Better, there adjustment "screws" would have a "screw" head.

    If you think you've read this one on another forum, may be you have, I've tried elsewhere and got little to no help. Maybe this is where all the chain saw experts are ;-)

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  2. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    I guess one needs "Sea Foam" or something similar for a 2 cycle engine. I'm not sure where to buy Sea Foam, but do recall it being touted as a great carb cleaner and one (the only?) that can be used in 2 cycle engines.
  3. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    I believe the "regular" 4 cycle carb/fuel system cleaner will not get along well with the oil in the fuel of a 2 cycle mixture, i.e., it will destroy the lubricating property of the oil. That's where Sea Foam comes in, it was designed/formulated to work with oil to clean varnish...whatever in 2 cycle application. I looked on the web and found NAPA auto parts carry SF. I may try some, then I'll have it for my many 2 cycle engine tools, I must have at least 4 such engines.
  4. cmonSTART

    cmonSTART Minister of Fire

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    if your saw isn't running correctly there is something wrong with it. I wouldn't recommend adding any carb cleaner additive to your mix as it can do damage to the diaphrams and gaskets and give you more issues.

    If it's suddenly not running right, it's probably more than just a tuning issue. Continuing to run the saw can (and likely will) result in burning it up. Be careful. A poorly tuned saw will burn itself up pretty quickly.
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