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Q&A catalytic stove

Post in 'Questions and Answers' started by QandA, Nov 18, 2007.

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  1. QandA

    QandA New Member Staff Member

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    Nov 27, 2012
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    Question:

    I recently installed a steel liner on my chimney which is connected to a Vermont Castings Dutchwest federal catalytic stove. The draft has increased so much that i can hear it, is this normal? The stove is brand new(less than 10 fires) , however since the liner was installed i get the firebox up to 500 degrees but the catalyst only reaches about 900 degrees; prior to the liner i was able to have the firebox at 400 degrees and have the catalyst reach 1200 degrees.What has caused such a change? It seems that the draft is almost to strong, however before it was less than adaquate! I have a 13 by 13 brick chimney.Should i be adding more wood with this new installation or adjust the secondary or primary air intake ( more or less) ?Can you also tell me the best settings for the secondary air intake(catalyst)?I am also thinking of adding 2 vents ( no fan) to the room to increase circulation of heat to the second level,will this work?



    Answer:

    Sounds like you have it right, your draft may be too strong. If the gases are sucked through the catalytic converter too quickly, then they do not have time to combust. Adjust your air controls further closed than before.

    You may even have to install a turn or barometric damper (do a search in the Q and A for more info) to tame your overdraft.

    The setting for the secondary air intake depends on the draft and wood. Probably closed more than it was before due to the change in draft, but use the temperature of the catalytic converter as a guide. It also may be time to clean your catalytic converter. They can tend to get a coating of dust on them which lowers their effectiveness.

    If the room is overheating, vents into other areas can definitely help. Keep in mind that heat rises, so vents are best high on the wall or in the ceiling leading to upstairs room. Sometime a simple, small computer-type fan in the upper corner of a doorway can do the trick.

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